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Full text of "Brethren's Family Almanac, The (1900)"

n 



' -' " ' ^ ' Brethren s Family Almanac. 



The Brethren 



Colonies... ,„ .^^ Northern Pacific 

^ Railway... 

...IN... 

North Dakota, Idaho and Washington j 

are prospering and increasing from year to year. 

[n Central North Dakota... 

the Brethren Church at Carrington has 182 members, including three elders, five 
ministers and fifteen deacons, with two branch Sunday schools, and four out- 
preaching stations. Many Brethren are located at Sykeston, Barlow, New Rock- 
ford, Sheyenne and Oberon. 

Free Government Land in Wells and McLean Counties. Railroad Land at 
;^3 to $5 per acre; ten years' time, six per cent interest, in McLean County. 

Excellent Grazing and Farming Lands farther west at very low prices. 

Reduced Rates for the Benefit of Settlers Are Now in Effect. 
In Idaho and Eastern Washington... 

Government Homesteads can still be obtained, and Railroad Lands can be bought 
from ^3 to $10 per acre on ten years' time at six per cent interest. 

Fertile Soil! Healthy Climate! Good Markets! 

The Northern Pacific Extensions... 

South and east from Lewiston^, Idaho, along the Clearwater River, are opening up 
wonderfully wealthy Farm, Fruit, Timber and Mineral Lands. Now is the time 
TO INVEST THERE. Many Brethren are located in the Nez Perce Reservation and 
in the Clearwater country. • ' ■ 

The Sunnyside District... 

of the Yakima Valley is one of the best irrigation propositions in the United 
States. The Brethren are settling there rapidly. Have worship regularly at Sunny- 
side, and expect to organize a church soon. Climate particularly beneficial to per- 
sons suffering with asthma, bronchial or lung troubles. All semi-tropical fruits do 
well and alfalfa leads as a money maker. 

Western Washington... (j j^ , 

offers unlimited opportunities for farming, lumbering, fishing and mining. 
For free maps and publications write to 

C. W. MOTT, 
General Emigration Agent, N. P. R'y. St. Paul, Minn. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 





In North Dakota and Montana 



' ! Along the 

Great Northern Railway 



North 



Milk River Valley 
of Montana 



Hundreds of Brethren have already located in that State, and there is still room for other 
Many church societies have been organized and nevi^comers are not deprived of educatior 
' al advantages. The original and principal settlements are along the Great Norther 

\\€\ \ccikfi Railway in the Turtle Mountain, Devils Lake and Mouse River districts, v/here ther 

._ are still free lands open to homeseekers. The Railway Company has no grant in the 

State and therefore no land for sale. Men w^ho are renting high-priced Eastern land the 
they can never hope to own, or else have farms too small to support their families, still have an opportunit 
to get a piece of Uncle Sam's estate, large enough to make each of them well off. Government land of rea 
agricultural value is being rapidly taken, and the man who wants good free land and puts off getting it ver 
ong will hear the old refrain, "Too late," when he begins to search. 

For printed matter and information about rates, routes, etc., address as below. 

Farming by irrigation. Rain when the sun shines. Every ma 
his own rain maker. Crops a certainty every year when water i 
properly used. Free Government land can be easily and cheapl 
irrigated from running streams and storage reservoirs. Six cc 
operative farmer ditches taken from the Milk River are in opers 

~ tion around the towns of Havre, Chinook, Yantic and Harlen 

The artificial distribution of water over the land for crop purposes (or every man his own rainmaker) is a sut 
ject little understood by the majority of the people of America. It is not a new thing by any means. Th 
earliest agriculture of the old continents began in arid lands. To this day more than two-thirds of the peopl 
of the earth live upon foods grown upon lands artificially watered. 

The Valley of the Milk River is in Northern Montana and has a length of over i8o miles. The ave 
age width of the valley is about two miles, although in places it widens out to four and five miles. The banl 
of the stream are timbered with cottonwood, box elder and ash. The bench lands are wonderfully adapted 1 
grazing purposes. Land can be bought with water right, or farmers can build their own ditches. Land pn 
duces all the staple grain and root crops. Good markets and shipping facilities. The Great Northern Rai 
way runs for i8o miles through the Milk River Valley. Bench lands furnish fine range for horses, cattle an 
sheep. Large veins of coal crop out of the banks of the Milk River and its tributaries. 

*♦ The Evergreen State." Washington offers to Homeseekers better o] 
Wonderful portunltles than any other part of the United States. Some of its advai 

.^ . tages — Finest climate in America, no long cold winters, no big fuel bill 

no heavy expenses for clothing, very little snow, in some sections none ; 
Wfl-Sh i n QTlOri • aU, finest grain and fruit land in America, no crop failures, plenty of free lac 
. ^ or choice locations at low prices, good markets, good schools and churches. 



For printed matter and information about rates, routes, etc., address, 



>♦♦>»»«' 



♦» 

The Great Northern Railway traverses the States of 

Minnesota. North Dakota, SoMth Dakota, Montana, Ida- 

: ho and Washington and reaches points In Oregon and 

; California. 



****\ 



General Immigration Agent, 

220 South Clark St., Chicago, I 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 




THIS ISA PHOTOGRAPH 

OF THE SKDLL OF A CALF. 



It will dehorn at a cost of less than 
one cent per head. 



BRAYTON'S CERTAIN HORN 
PREVENTER 

Was applied when the calf was three days 
old. Six weeks after it was killed for veaL 
There were no signs of horns. 

Brayton's Certain Horn Preventer 

A Wonderful Scientific Discovery- 
It is a chemical compound which, when 
applied to the embryo horn, will stop its 
growth and leave the head perfectly 
smooth. 

This is the cheapest, easiest and most 
humane method of producing hornless 
cattle. 



Sent prepaid to any address on receipt 
of price, 75 cents. 



See What Those Say Who Have Used It: 



Greentown, Ind., June ii, 1898. 
I have been using your Certain Horn Preventer some four 
years. I am about out. Do you want an agent at this place? If 
so, write me at once. M. H. Shockley. 

* * * 

CiRCLEVILLE, W. Va., Feb. 22, 1899. 

Enclosed find pay in currency for two dozen Certain Horn Pre- 
venter. I have sold your Preventer before and it gives general 
satisfaction. Lee Bennett. 

Petersburg, Pa., Dec. 26, 1898. 
I have used your Certain Horn Preventer seven years and am 
well pleased with it. I think I can sell a quantity of it, as a num- 
ber of persons have asked me for it. J. C. Henderson. 

* * * 

Petersburg, Pa., Jan. 20, 1899. 
Please find enclosed check for which send me two dozen of 
Certain Horn Preventer. I sold the other dozen without going 
•ff the farm and I think by canvassing I can sell a great many 

^ozeui J. C. Henderson. 

* * * 

JoHNSBURG, Pa., Dec. 19, 1898, 
Yon wiH remember you shipped one bottle of Certain Horn 
PrcTcnter to me aljout one year ago. It did its work exceedingly 
■wett. We hare all muleys. No signs of horns. 

W. F. Miller. 



JoHNSBURG, Pa., Jan. 18, 1899. 
I sold the fourteen bottles in one day, and could have sold 
more if I had had them. Send another dozen. It is the greatest 
seller on the market. W. F. Miller. 

Louisville, Ohio, Nov. 17, 1898, 
I received the Horn Preventer all O. K., and am well pleaseX 
I have used it for five years and it never failed. Please give me 

terms to agents. I, E. Kagey. 

* * * 

Keyser, W. Va. 
I received a bottle of your Certain Horn Preventer in the year 
of 1898 and I find it what you represent it to be. My neighbors 
are after me to try it on their calves, because it always does its 
work every time I put it on, and it saves bloody heads and suffer- 
ing. Berkley Umsted. 

Summerfield, Kans., March 27, 1899. 
I have used your Certain Horn Preventer five years and find it 
all you claim for it, and a sure preventer. 

Simon Studebaker. 

* * * 

Lilly, Va., March 20, 1899. 
About four or five years ago I ordered a half dozen bottles of 
your Certain Horn Preventer. I used one bottle and sold tha 
others. It is all right and our people are beginning to see it is 
much better than cutting off the horns. J. D. Glick. 



Agests wanted everywhere at good profit. Send for terms. Made only by 



Ctiemist.., 



A. ^^. BI^AYTON, 

IVIount M^orris, Illinois. 



Year] 



FA^JMILY ^LlVE^lSrA^C. 



[1900. 



ECLIPSES FOR THE YEAR 1900. 
In the year 1900 there will be three Eclipses — two of the Sun and one of the Moon. 
The First is a Total Eclipse of the Sun, May 28th —Visible as follows: 

EASTERN STATES. CENTRAL STATES. WESTERN STATES. MANITOBA. 



Eclipse begins May 28th at 7 o'clock 15 min. 
Central Eel. " " 8 " 17 " 


6 o'clock 35 min. 


5 o'clock 55 min. 


5 o'clock 40 min. A.M. 


7 '♦ 37 •' 


6 " 57 •• 


6 •• 42 •• A.M. 


Middle of Eclipse " 9 " 59 " 


9 •• 19 " 


8 " 39 •• 


8 " 24 " A. M. 


Central Eclipse ends " 11 " 36 '* 


10 " 56 •• 


10 " 16 •• 


9 " 01 " A. M. 


Eclipse ends " 12 " 38 " 


11 '• 58 " 


11 " 18 " 


10 " 03 " A.M. 



1^ This eclipse is visible in Western Europe, Northern Africa, the North Atlantic Ocean, 
Greenland, North America and the eastern and northern parts of South America. The path of 
Total Eclipse crosses the North American continent on a line bearing" to the south-west over Nor- 
folk, Va., to New Orleans and across the Gulf of Mexico and Mexico to the Pacific coast at a point 
near Cape Corrientes. Visible elsewhere as a partial eclipse. 

The Second is a Partial Eclipse of the Moon, June 12th, at 9 o'clock 50 min. in the 
evening-. Visible here but very small and unimportant as only .01 part of the moon is eclipsed. 

The Third is an Annular Eclipse of the Sun, Nov. 22d, at 1 o'clock 45 min. in the 
morning". Invisible here. Visible to Borneo, Sumatra, Australia, South Africa and the Indian Ocean. 

Mercury (?) is Called the Ruling Planet this Year. 
CHAEACTEKS OF THE CONSTELLATIONS. 



^ Aries, the Ram. 
^ Taurus, the Bull. 
^ Gemini, the Twins. 
^ Cancer, the Crab. 



<j3| Leo, the Lion. 
^ Virgo, the Virgin. 
^ Libra, the Balance. 
c|g Scorpio, the Scorpion. 



jjH^ Sagittarius, the Bowm 
^ Capricornus, the Go?t. 
^ Aquarius, the Butler. 
jg£ Pisces, the Fishes. 



ASTRONOMICAL CHARACTERS EXPLAINED. 



iMllNew Moon. 

First Quarter, or Moon in general 

iFull Moon. 

Last Quarter, or Moon in general. 



T? Saturn, $ Venus, 

if Jupiter, 5 Mercury, 

S Mars, © Earth, 

Sun, JJC Herschel. 

]) Moon, qj Neptune. 



S Moon's ascending Node, or Dragon's 

Head. 
S Moon's descending Node, or Dragon's 

Tail. 
^ Moon's Ascension. 
^ Moon's Descension. 
5 Moon in apogee, farthest from earth 
]) Moon in perigee, nearest to the earth 

PLANETS AND ASPECTS. 

d Conjunction, or planets in the same longitude. 
>)< Sextile, when they are 60 degrees apart. 
D Quartile, when they are 90 degrees distant 
A Trine, when they are 120 degrees distant. 
(^Opposition, when they are 180 degrees distant 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Letter 
Epact 



G 

29 



Lunar Cycle or Golden NmnHer 1 

Solar Cycle 5 



Roman Indiction 
Julian Period 



13 
6613 



Ember Days: March 7th, June 6th, September 19, December 19. 



In the Jewish Era the year 5661 commences at Sunset, September 23d, 1900. 

In the Mohammedan Era the year 1318 begins on the 1st day of May, 1900. 



THE FOUR SEASONS OR CARDINAL POINTS. 



Spring begins, March 20th, at 8 o'clock in the evening. 
Summer begins June 21st, at 4 o'clocic in the evening. 



Autumn begins September 23d at 7 o'clock in the 
Winter begins December 22d at 1 o'clock in the 



morning, 
morning. 



^^The calculations in this Almanac are made to Solar or Apparent Time. 
Table when the Sun is "slow" and subtract it when "fast," for mean or clock time. 
Dale Enterprise, Rockingham Co., Virginia. 



To this add the equation in the Hour 
L. J. Heatwole. 



Year] 



F^M:1LY j^JLl^J^NJ^G. 



[1900. 



CENTBNNIflL f\LMf\NflG FOR 1900. 

MERCURY IS CALLED THE RULING PLANET THIS YEAR. 

warm, wheat and rye will in the present year 
yield largely in straw, but little in g-rain; but if 
the preceding- year was humid, they will yield 
well in the grain. Rye and wheat will be en- 
dangered in the blossoming. 

August Seeding.— The early and the late 
will be the best; the middle one will be con- 
sumed by the flies. The early sown grain can 
be pastured by the sheep in the spring, but the 
late sown must not. 

Fruit. — In some places it will grow abund- 
antly, in some places tolerably, and in others 
there will be none at all. 

Hops.— Will not be abundant nor strong. 

Grape Culture seldom succeeds; probably 
in five or six years once, is always rough, and if 
it ever promises fairly in the spring, it 
seldom produces anything good; but two un- 
productive years will follow yet, viz., that of 
the Moon and Saturn. 

Tempests and Thundergusts. — The east 
wind will be the most prevalent, sometimes the 
west, but seldom the north wind; during the 
summer there will be but few thundergusts. 

Fishes. — There will be but few fish in the 
streams during the summer; in the autumn 
they will increase. 

Diseases. — Can be cured only slowly in this 
year, and they prevail mostly in the spring and 
latter part of autumn. Epidemic diseases gen- 
erally prevail among the cattle this year. 



The Year in General. — Is more dry and 
cold than warm, and seldom fruitful. 

Spring. — The end of March will be warm; 
April, until the 25th, dry, afterwards cold. May 
will have some cold days in the commencement, 
so that the fruit will be in danger. 

Summer. — Will have a good deal of rain, by 
which the earth will, however, not be properly 
•refreshed. The hay and grain can be brought 
in pretty well, though it will be best not to de- 
lay with it. 

Autumn. — In the commencement there will 
be a great deal of rain, and there will be early 
frost; but when the half of October is past, 
there will be dry weather until the commence- 
ment of advent. 

Winter. — After a pleasant autumn, winter 
will fall in suddenly in the commencement of 
December; it will be cold and snow until Feb- 
ruary, which will appear rather mild; but from 
the middle on to the 4th of March it will be cold 
and from then on to the termination, storms and 
tempests will take place. 

Cultivation of Spring Grain. — Will succeed 
pretty well. It is a favorite year for barley. 
Oats, peas, and other leguminous plants must 
be sown when the ground is neither too dry nor 
too wet and damp. Hemp and flax will be good, 
but the hemp will remain short. 

Cultivation of Winter Grain.— Is various. 
If the summer of the preceding year was very 



MOVABLE FESTIVALS. 



Septuagesima Sunday, February 11th. 
Sexagesima Sunday, February 18th. 
Quinquagesima Sunday, February 25th 
Shrove Tuesday, February 27th. 
Ash Wednesday, February 28th. 
Palm Sunday, April 8th. 
Good Friday, April 13th. 

flnatomu of Man's Bo(lu,_as said to 

The Head and Face. 
^ Akies. 

Arms. 
^ Gemini. 

Heart. 
^Leo. 

Reins. 
^ Libra. 

Thighs. 
ig^ Sagittarius. 

Legs. 
^ Aquarius. 



Easter Sunday, April 15th. 

Ascension Day, May 24th. 

Whitsuntide, June 3d. 

Trinity Sunday, June 10th. 

Corpus Christi, June 14th. 

Sundays after Trinity are 24. 

First Sunday in Advent, December 2d. 

be governed bu the Twelve Constellations. 

Neck 
1^ Taurus. 

Breast 
^ Cancer. 

Bowels. 
^ Virgo. 

Secrets. 
c|g Scorpio. 

Knees. 
^ Capricorn. 

The Feet. 
S Pisces. 




Ist Month.] 






df\NUf\RY. 




[Dayi 


3 31. 


Days & Weeks 


5° 


Remarkable 
Days. 


H 


MOON 

Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon '5 
Signs. 
S. D. 


Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 


Snn 
Slow 
M. 


Rises & Sets. 
H. M. i H. M. 


1 Mond'y 


20 


New Year 


12 


ir 54 


])sets. 


^28 


/^pfei 6 s (L ^ 


4 


7 23 


4 3T 


2 Tues. 


21 


Abel Seth 


1 


12 58 


7 18 


^12 


N^P© in Perihelion 


4 


7 23 


4 37 


3 Wed. 


22 


Enoch 


2 


1 55 


8 9 


^26 


]) in Perigee 


5 


7 23 


4 37 


4 Thurs. 


23 


Methuselah 


3 


2 50 


8 55 


as^ 9 


d $ c 


5 


7 22 


4 38 


5 Friday 


24 


Simon 


4 


3 42 


9 49 


a-j22 


2 sets 8 1 Q 


6 


7 ^52 


4 38 


6 Sat. 


25 


Epi^phany 


5 


4 33 


10 43 


1^ 5 


Orion souths 10 39 


6 


7 21 


4 39 



1] 1st Sunday after Epiphany. Luke 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 18 min. 



7 Sunday 


26 


8 Mond'y 


27 


9 Tues. 


28 


10 Wed. 


29 


11 Thurs. 


30 


12 Friday 


31 


13 Sat. 


J 



Isidor 
Erhard 
Julian 
Paul's Imp. 
Eugene 

Menno Simon's 

Renunciation 1536 

Menno Simon 

died 1561 



6 


5 23 


11 45 


^1^ 


7 


6 14 


morn. 


fP*29 


8 


7 6 


12 47 


^11 


9 


7 59 


1 38 


^22 


9 


8 52 


2 37 


^ 4 


10 


9 46 


3 30 


*»16 


11 


10 38 


4 36 


^28 



d?T? 

T^ rises 4 27 
?in S 

Spica rises 10 15 
Rigel souths 9 30 
7* souths 8 8 ]) in S 
dWC* Ifr. 2 34 ^ 



7 


7 20 


7 


7 20 


7 


7 19 


8 


7 19 


8 


7 18 


9 


7 18 


9 


7 17 



4 40 
4 40 
4 41 
4 41 

4 42 
4 42 
4 43 



2] 2d Sunday after Epiphany. John 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 26 miiu 



14 Sunday 


2 


Felix 


12 


11 29 


5 47^11 


Aldebaran so. 8 44 


9:7 17 


4 43 


15 Mond'y 


3 


Maurice 


1 


morn. 


(prises 


«23 


^^Sirius so. 10 50 


10 


7 16 


444 


16 Tues. 


4 


Marcellus 


• 2 


12 17 


6 4 


<f* 6 


Wd^0 


10 


7 15 


4 45 


17 Wed. 


5 


Anthony 


2 


1 3 


6 58 


<f*19 


Regulus souths 1 45 


11 


7 14 


4 46 


18 Thurs. 


6 


FranMin h. 


3 


1 46 


8 2 


^ 2 


$ sets 8 13 


11 


7 13 


4 47 


19 Friday 


7 


Sarah 


3 


2 28 


9 10 


J^15 


^inAph. JinApg. S 


11 


7 12 


4 48 


20 Sat. 


8 


F. Sebastian 


4 


3 9 


10 20 


i5^29 


enters ^ 


11 


7 11 


4 49 



3] 3d Sunday after Epiphany. Matt. 8. 



Day's length 9 hours 37 min. 



21 Sunday 


9 


22 Mond'y 


10 


23 Tues. 


11 


24 Wed. 


12 


25 Thurs. 


13 


26 Friday 


14 


27 Sat. 


15 



Agnes 

Vincent 

Emerenth 

Timothy 

PauVs Conv 

Polycarpus 

F. Chrysost. 



5 


3 49 


11 30 


)^^ -l-«^ 


5 


4 31 


morn. 


^27 


6 


5 14 


12 26 


«ii 


7 


6 


1 20 


«25 


8 


6 50 


2 10 


m 9 


9 


7 43 


2 58 


S^24 


9 


8 40 


3 50 


^ 8 



Procyon so. 11 16 

CT^ rises 3 46 
Orion so. 9 21 
Sirius souths 10 8 
Spica rises 11 21 



12 


7 11 


12 


7 10 


12 


7 9 


12 


7 8 


13 


7 7 


13 


7 6 


13 


7 5 



49 
50 
51 
52 

5a 

54 
5g 



4] 4th Sunday after Epiphany. Matt. 8. Day's length 9 hours 50 min. 


28 Sunday 

29 Mond'y 

30 Tues. 

31 Wed. 


16 
17 
18 
19 


Charles 
Valerius 
Adelgunda 
Virgil 


10 
11 
12 

1 


9 39 

10 38 

11 37 

12 35 


4 52 

5 47 

6 10 

3) sets. 


^22 
.^20 


d T? C- ? sets 8 21 
H souths 7 42 

J|||d ? C. 6 $(L 
vi@#3) in Perigee. 


13 
14 
14 
14 


7 4 
7 3 
7 2 
7 1 


4 5ft 
4 57 
4 5g 
4 59 



IV/IOON'S RMASEIS. 

EASTERN STATES. 
New Moon, 1st, 8 o'clock 54 min. Morn. 
First Quarter, 8th, 12 ** 42 *' Morn. 
FuUMoon, 15th, 2 " 9 " Even. 
Last Quarter, 23d, 6 ** 55 " Even. 
New Moon, 30th, 8 " 24 ** Even. 

Maks is in conjunction with the Sun on the 16th and cannot be seen. 



CENTRAL STATES. 


WESTERN STATES. 


8 o'clock 14 min. Morn. 


7 o'clock 34 min. Mom 


[2 " 2 " Morn. 


7th, 11 " 22 '• Evem 


1 " 29 *' Even. 


12 *' 49 " Even 


6 •» 15 " Even. 


5 " 35 *' Svett 


7 «i 44 »« Even. 


6 ♦' 4 " Brea 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



THE SHIP OF THE DESERT. 



BY H. B. BRUMBAUGH. 

Almost from the beginning of time it has been 
;cessary to have means for removing productions 
id things from one place to another. To do this, all 
e known forces have been utilized — water, steam, 
ectricity and the different kinds of animals. 
Perhaps of all these forces used, the animal was 
e most ancient. Being accustomed to the more 
odern appliances, the improved water, steam and 
ectric, we cannot well conceive how the exchang- 
g of products could be made without them, es- 
icially the railroad which now extends from ocean 
ocean and from North to South. Yet a half cen- 




ry ago the productions of our country were carried 
Dm place to place over the water canals and the 
iv turnpikes that stretched from East to West. 
hile these answered their purpose then, they would 
ove greatly inadequate now with the vast increase 
our productions. And yet there are ways and 
eans by which the common wants of mankind can 
: satisfied without any of the more modern inven- 
ts. 



In many countries that were inhabited centuries 
before our own, the people lived and did business 
without using either wagons, boats or railroad cars. 
And it is surprising how much can be done by the use 
of the more primitive modes, the beasts of burden. 
And among these, none, perhaps, have been-of more 
use through all time than the camel, the ship of the 
desert, which is now so much used in Oriental lands. 
At our distance from Eastern life and customs it is 
hard for us to imagine how a world or people could 
live and get along with no way of moving produce 
and exchangeable commodities except by beasts of 
burden. But as you get into these countries and see 
how it is done, the mystery disappears. 

Of all animals known the camels are best adapted 
to carrying burdens in a number of ways. They can 
travel and endyre longer 
without food and water than 
any other burden beast. 
They can eat and live on 
almost any kind of food that 
grows. Even in the desert, 
Jg where all other animals 

jMp would perish, they find pas- 

^^H^^y turage. And they can travel 

Jgj^^^m^ underheavyburdensfordays 

without either food or drink. 
This is a great advantage, 
and a special providence in 
making journeys across the 
great deserts where neither 
■ water nor food cafn be had. 
Their broad and spongy feet 
are especially adapted to 
travel over sandy routes, 
such as are very common in 
these Eastern countries. 
Then, too, their remarkable 
strength and endurance fit 
them for burden-bearing pur- 
poses. And, lastly, they are 
exceedingly careful and sure 
footed, which enables them 
to travel over all kinds of rough roads and pathways; 
and bad roads and rough by-ways are the rule in 
many of these old countries. 

During our late travels through the Eastern world 
we first noticed the camel as beast of burden in Asia. 
And while at Smyrna we saw large caravans of them 
coming in from the North and East — ^bringing the 
wheat, dates and figs to market, this being the pack- 
ing and preparing center for all that part of the 



Getting old before their time is the condition of many men 
i ■women. They need a mild, invigorating remedy to cleanse 
; blood and strengthen the system. Dr. Peter's Blood Vital- 
T fills tke bill. 



Sisters of tlie Bretliren Ctiurch who wish to know "ivhai 
kind of bonnets to wear, how to make them and how much they 
cost," will receive an illustrated price-list of fhese goods free, by 
addressing H. E. Newcomer, Mt. Morris, ill. 



2dMoiitli/ 








FEBRUf\RY. 




;Days 28. 


Days & Weeks 




Remarkable 
Days. 


WTO 

H 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Riseii & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S D. 


flspects 0! Planets, and ^K.SYY.rs 
Other Miscellanu. m. h. m. ih. m. 


1 Thurs. 

2 Friday 

3 Sat. 


20 
21 

22 


Ignatius 

Candlemas 

Blasius 


2 
3 
4 


1 30 

2 23 

3 16 


7 15 

8 21 

9 20 


3»1'J^$ sets 8 23 ^ 14 6 59 
2J;30d $ ([. 1? so. 9 10 S14 6 58 
^12d ^ S 146 57 


5 1 

5 2 
5 3 



5] 5th Sunday after Epiphany. Matt. 12. 



Day's length 10 hours 6 min. 



4 Sunday 


23 


5 Mond'y 


24 


6 Tues. 


25 


7 Wed. 


26 


8 Thurs. 


27 


9 Friday 


28 


10 Sat. 


29 



Veronica 

Agatha 

Dorothea 

Richard 

Solomon 

Apollonia 

Scholastica 



5 


4 9 


10 18 


fP«25 


6 


5 1 


11 15 


^ 7 


7 


5 55 


morn. 


^19 


7 


6 49 


12 40 


*» 1 


8 


7 42 


1 46 


*»12 


9 


8 35 


2 34 


*»24 


10 


9 26 


3 16 


m 6 



Antares rises 3 46 
Sirius souths 9 24 
If souths 7 15 
Arcturus r. 9 32 
$ G. H. L.S, D in S 
d t|; ([. d ? Sup. 
Rigel so. 7 32 ^ 



14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
15 
15 



56 
55 
54 
53 
52 
51 
49 



4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 
5 11 



6] Septuagesima Sunday. 



Matt. 20. 



Day's length 10 hours 22 min. 



11 Sunday 

12 Mond'y 

13 Tues. 

14 Wed. 

15 Thurs. 

16 Friday 

17 Sat. 



30 
31 
F 

2 

3 
4 

5 



Euphrosina 
Gilbert 
F. Castor 
Valentine 
Faustin 
Julianus 
Constantia 



11 


10 14 


3 54 


«18 


12 


11 


4 50 


<m 2 


12 


11 44 


5 48 


^15 


1 


morn. 


]) rises 


^28 


2 


12 26 


7 8 


^11 


2 


1 7 


7 54 


^25 


3 


1 48 


8 38 


^5^ 9 



Orion souths 6 20 
Vega rises 12 13 
Spica sets 10 6 
r^$ sets 8 29 
"^ ]) in Apogee 
Andro. s. 9 50 
Regulus so. 11 58 



S 



15 


6 48 


15 


6 47 


15 


6 45 


14 


6 44 


14 


6 43 


14 


6 42 


14 


6 41 



12 
13 
15 

16 
17 
18 
19 



7] Sexagesima Sunday. 



Luke 8. 



Day's length 10 hours 38 min. 



18 Sunday 

19 Mond'y 

20 Tues. 

21 Wed. 

22 Thurs. 

23 Friday 

24 Sat. 



6 Concordia 

7 Susanna 
8,Eucharius 
9Eleonora 

1 i\ Washington 
^^ born. 

11 Serenus 
l^St.Mattheio 



3 


2 29 


9 35 


*24 


4 


3 12 


10 36,c|g 8 


5 


3 56 


11 40c|g22 


5 


4 43 


morn. 


m 6 


6 


5 34 


12 44 


S^20 


7 


6 27 


1 50 


m 4 


8 


7 23 


2 44 


^18 



Capella so. 6 58 
1/so. 6 31.0ent.«; 
Vega rises 11 32 
Pollux so. 9 38 

d V ([. ]) in g2 ^ 
d T? C- ? sets 8 33 



14i6 
14i6 
14'6 
14|6 

14:6 

14:6 
136 



39 

38 
37 



5 21 
5 22 
5 23 



35;5 25 
34,5 26 

33 5 27 
32|5 28 



8] QUINQUAGESIMA SUNDAY. 



Luke 18. 



Day's length 10 hours 56 min. 



25 Sunday 

26 Mond'y 

27 Tues. 

28 Wed. 



Victorinus 
Jeremiah 
Sh'oveTues 
Ash Wedn. 



9 


8 20 


3 20 


^ 2 


10 


9 18 


4 8 


^15 


11 


10 15 


4 58 


^29 


12 


11 12 


5 45 


SSl2 



7* sets 12 34 
\^ souths 7 48 
§ in 8. $ in 2 



13 6 



30 
29 

28 

27 



5 30 
5 31 
5 32 



IVIOOIM'S PHASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 



CENTRAL STATES. 



WESTERN STATES. 



First Quarter, 6th, 11 o'clock 25 min. Morn. 10 o'clock 45 min. Morn. 
Full Moon, 14th, 8 '' 52 '' Morn. 8 " 12 '^ Morn. 
Last Quarter, 22d, 11 '* 40 " Morn. 11 " 6 '" Morn. 



10 o'clock 5 min. Morn 

7 •• 32 •• Morn 

10 '• 2t) " Morn 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



country, covering hundreds of miles. It is a most 
interesting sight, at the entrance of the city, to see 
the great caravan^ of loaded camels as they approach 
the city and stop at the resting places before enter- 
ing. As you see the scores of hundreds as they come 
in through the gate, burdened down with the produce 
of the surrounding and distant countries, it is no 
more a question how the world can move its produc- 
tions without wagons, boats and cars. 

At Damascus, another Oriental business center, the 
camel is everywhere present as burden bearer. While 
there we had taken the photograph seen on page 7, 
of a train of camels leaving the city for Jerusalem, a 
distance of 170 miles south. The large sacks, one on 
each side, which you see in the picture, contain from 
eight to ten bushels of wheat, so that each camel car- 
ries from sixteen to twenty bushels, and frequently 
the driver on top. This train consisted of about fifty 
camels. 

And when you are told that the sacks placed on 
their backs at Damascus are not taken off until they 
reach the warehouses in Jerusalem, you are made to 
wonder in surprise. But when you know how these 
beasts are loaded and unloaded you will breathe 
easier. The two sacks are stood on end far enough 
apart to allow a camel to walk between. They then 
get down on their knees when the sacks are leaned 
one to the other and tied together, the camel then 
gets up and he has his load on his back, a very 
simple and easy way of loading produce for market. 
To unload they kneel down, the sacks are loosened 
at the tops and the load is off. At evening when they 
stop for the night they kneel down. When the bot- 
toms of the sacks stand on the ground the burden is 
lifted from their backs and they rest, feed and sleep 
under and between their burdens. We saw hundreds 
3f them doing this outside of the wall, near the Damas- 
:us gate, at Jerusalem, and it is one among the inter- 
esting sights to be seen in this land of the Bible. 

The picture is a good one and bears study when 
ione in connection with the Bible story. 



HICKORY QROVE CHURCH, MIAMI COUNTY, 
OHIO. 



BY JACOB COPPOCK, 

From the year 1827 the territory now known as 
Donnels Creek, Lost Creek and Hickory Grove were 
)ne organization presided over by Elder Christian 
Frantz. In the part now called Hickory Grove Isaac 
Darst was a minister in the second degree and John 
5tudebaker, deacon; in all about twenty-five members. 



In 1830 Henry Harshbarger, David Landis, deacons, 
and Isaac Karns, elder, moved in. Then what is now 
Hickory Grove church was organized with about forty 
members under the care of Isaac Karns. 

In the fall of 1832 Isaac Darst died. In 1833 John 
Studebaker died. Soon after Abraham Studebaker 
was elected deacon. In 1835 Henry Harshbarger 
moved out and David Landis was elected to the min- 
istry. In 1836 David Shelabarger, Adam Stinebarger 
and Henry Rubsom, ministers in the second degree, 
moved in, and Isaac Karns moved to Indiana. Shela- 
barger's certificate of membership contained in addi- 
tion to the usual recommendation the statement that 
he was sufficiently established to be ordained, but it 
had not been done for want of help, and though a 
novice he was ordained (which was the key to years 
trouble in the church). 

In 1837 James Ward and Daniel Arnold were elect- 
ed deacons. Ward at this time insisted on the ordi- 
nation of Darst, so that their children could be mar- 
ried in English. Some time later Ward moved out. 
About 1849 the interest in the good cause grew so low 
that for a time there were no regular preaching serv- 
ices held, though there'were three resident ministers; 
but by the efforts of David Bowman, John Darst and 
Peter Nead the work was again established, David 
Shelabarger being in charge. 

In 1853 David Landis and David Shelabarger 
moved out, and Joseph Arnold and Jacob Snell were 
elected deacons. David Studebaker, a minister in 
the second degree, moved in. He proved a minister 
of great influence, and being dead yet speaketh. 
Now there were about eighty members. In 1855 the 
present house of worship was built. Prior to that 
time services were held in private homes. In 1856 
Abraham Studebaker died. In 1858 Joseph Arnold 
was elected to the ministry, S. S. Studebaker deacon, 
and Henry Rubsom and Adam Stinebarger ordained. 
From the time David Shelabarger moved out until 
the above ordination the church was under the care 
of Elder John Frantz, of Donnel's Creek. 

In i860 John Crist was elected to the ministry and 
Samuel Coppock and Jacob Frantz, deacons. In 1861 
Jesse Studebaker, minister in second degree, moved 
in. He remained three years. In 1862 John Crist 
was advanced to the second degree, and soon moved 
to Illinois. In 1863 G. W. Studebaker moved in and 
labored here for two years, then moved to Indiana. 
In this time the death of David Studebaker occurred, 
which was deeply lamented. There were now one 
hundred members. 

About this time (1865) Rubsom and Stinebarger 
were relieved of their ministry by a committee from 



Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer costs less than other good med- 
cines, when measured by results. A record of over one hun- 
Ired years constant use has demonstrated its merits. 



We want you to investigate our standing and ability. Read 
what the Brethren think of us on second page of cover. — Drs. 
Thornton & Minor. 



r. 



M Month.] 



Mf=\RGH. 



[Days 31.' 



Days & Weeks 






Remarkable 
Days. 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
5. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 



SUD 

Slow 
M. 



Rises & Sets 
H. M. i H. M. 



1 Thurs. 

2 Friday 

3 Sat. 



17 
18 
19 



Sl David 
Simplicius 
Samuel 



12 7 
1 1 
1 55 



3) sets, te 25 
8 16^20 



]) in Per. S ^ 
d^C. ? s. 8 35 
□ V 0- b so. 7 33 



13 
12 
12 



2515 35 
24 5 36 
22 5 38 



9] 1st Sunday in Lent. 



Matt. 4. 



Day's length 11 hours 14 min. 



4 Sunday 


20 


5 Mond'y 


21 


6 Tues. 


22 


7 Wed. 


23 


8 Thurs. 


24 


9 Friday 


25 


10 Sat. 


26 



Adrian 

Frederick 

Fridolin 

Emherday 

Philemon 

Prudence 

Apollonius 



3 


2 50 


9 21 


^ 2 


4 


3 46 


10 30 


^14 


5 


4 41 


11 38 


^26 


6 


5 37 


morn. 


^ 8 


7 


6 30 


12 30 


^20 


8 


7 22 


1 18 


m 2 


9 


8 11 


2 16 


«14 



d $ ([• $ in Perih. 
t|J stationary 
If souths 5 39 
Orionso. 6 32. ])inS 

d tpc ^ 

Rigelsets 11 20 
Spica rises 8 20 



12 


6 21 


12 


6 20 


11 


6 18 


11 


6 17 


11 


6 16 


11 


6 14 


10 


6 13 



39 
40 
42 
43 
44 
46 
47 



10] 2d Sunday in Lent. 



Matt. 15. 



Day's length 11 hours 34 min. 



11 Sunday 


27 


12 Monday 


28 


13 Tues. 


M 


14 Wed. 


2 


15 Thurs. 


3 


16 Friday 


4 


17 Sat. 


5 



Ernestus 

Gregory 

Maeedon 

Zachariah 

Christopher 

Cyprianus 

St. Patrick 



10 


8 58 


3 14 


«26 


10 


9 42 


3 50 


n 9 


11 


10 25 


4 21 


<f*22 


12 


11 6 


4 58 


^ 6 


12 


11 47 


5 30 


^20 


1 


morn. 


(prises 


^ 4 


2 


12 28 


7 35 


^5^ -Ly 



Arcturus r. 9 16 
Regulus so. 10 39 
Orion souths 8 7 
^stationary. 3)inApo 
ntp0. Vegar.lOSS 
€>0i so. 5 
V^ stationary 



10 


6 12 


10 


6 10 


10 


6 9 


9 


6 8 


9 


6 6 


9 


6 4 


8 


6 3 



4a 
50 
51 
52 
54 
56 
57 



11] 3d Sunday in Lent. 



Luke 11. 



Day's length 11 hours 52 min. 



18 Sunday 

19 Mond'y 

20 Tues. 

21 Wed. 

22 Thurs. 

23 Friday 

24 Sat. 



6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



Anshelmus 

Josephus 

Matrona 

Benedictus 

Paulina 

Eberhard 

Gabriel 



2 


1 11 


8 50 


« 4 


3 


1 55 


9 50 


«19 


3 


2 4110 54 


l#7 <^ 


4 


3 30 


11 56 


m^^ 


5 


4 21 


morn. 


m 1 


6 


5 15 


12 54 


^15 


7 


6 10 


1 40 


^29 



$ in Perihelion 
Spica rises 8 1 

Oent.^^^s^p?^,-teS'' 
Vega rises 9 40 

d 1^ C. ]) in a ^ 
dbC. d?0 Infer 



8 


6 2 


8 


6 1 


7 


6 


7 


5 59 


7 


5 57 


6 


5 56 


6 


5 55 



58 
59 

1 
3 
4 
5 



12] 4th Sunday in Lent. 



John 6. 



Day's length 12 hours 10 min. 



25 Sunday 

26 Mond'y 

27 Tues. 

28 Wed. 

29 Thurs. 

30 Friday 

31 Sat. 



13 
14 



Ann, V. M. 
Emmanuel 



15 Gustavus 



Gideon 
Eustatius 
Guido 
Detlaus 



8 


7 5 


2 31 


^12 


9 


8 1 


3 8 


^25 


10 


8 56 


3 47 


^ 8 


10 


9 50 


4 16 


a£2i 


11 


10 44 


5 4 


IP* 4 


12 


11 38 


C sets. 


irf^ie 


1 


12 33 


7 50 


11*28 



D T? 0. F? souths 6 6 
7* sets 11 55 
% stationary 
Pollux so. 7 2 S 
6 S V 3) in Perigee 

d?C 

11 souths 4 1 



6 


5 53 


6 


5 52 


5 


5 50 


5 


5 49 


5 


5 48 


4 


5 46 


4 


5 45 



7 
8 
10 
11 
12 
14 



EASTERN STATES. 



IVIOOIM'S RMASES. 

CENTRAL STATES. 



WESTERN STATES. 



New Moon, 



First Quarter, 8th, 12 
Full Moon, 16th, 3 
Last Quarter, 24th, 12 
New Moon, 30th, 3 



1st, 6 o'clock 27 min. Morn. 



5 o'clock 47 min. Morn. 5 o'clock 7 min. Morn 



36 


(( 


Morn. 


7th, 11 


u 


56 


(( 


Even. 


11 


(( 


16 


(i 


Even 


14 


(( 


Mom. 


2 


u 


24 


(( 


Morn. 


1 


(( 


44 


(> 


Morn 


38 


(( 


Morn. 


23d, 11 


u 


58 


u 


Even. 


11 


(( 


18 


(( 


Even 


32 


k( 


Even. 


2 


(( 


52 


u 


Even. 


2 


(( 


12 


(( 


Even 



Bretln^eiis Family Almanac. 



II 



Annual Meeting and H. D. Davy and Abraham Flory 
placed in charge; Fiory remained in charge until the 
division of '8i. In 1866 Samuel Coppock was elect- 
ed minister, Jacob Hawier and John Filburn, deacons. 
In 1872 Isaac Studebaker, minister in second degree, 
moved in. In 1873 O. F. Yount was called to the 
ministry and labored here until 1876. The Middle 
District was formed; he and Samuel Coppock were 
living in that territory. In 1879 Jos. ^ Arnold was or- 
dained and Jacob Coppock and D. S. Filburn were 
elected deacons. In 1880 Henry Gump was called to 
the ministry and Harrison Shull, a deacon, moved in. 
In 1881 the memorable divide took from us about 
thirty members, including Eider Flory, our minister, 
and three deacons, leaving the church with Henry 
Gump, minister and two deacons ; in all about one hun- 
dred members. The church now called Elder John 
Smith to take charge. The experiences had in the 
'division were such that the church was knit together 
-with a very strong feeling of love that, barring a few 
little incidents along the way, exists to-day to a very 
great degree. 

In 1881 Jacob Coppock was called to the ministry 
and Henry Gump advanced to the second degree. 

In 1882 the first series of meetings was held by the 
assistance of I. J. Rosenberger. The meetings were 
held with many fears on the part of some and deep 
anxiety on the part of others; they resulted in twen- 
ty-eight accessions and greatly confirmed the mem- 
bers. In 1885 D. S. Filburn was called to the minis- 
try and Jacob Denlinger and John Tanreuther were 
elected deacons, and after a short service in their 
official capacity they both went to their reward. In 
1886 Henry Gump was ordained and Jacob Snell 
elected deacon. In 1891 Samuel Studebaker, Jr., 
^nd Geo, Zimmerman were called to the deaconship. 
In 1893 Samuel Gump was called to the ministry. 

The official board now stands: ministers, Henry 
Gump, Jacob Coppock, D. S. Filburn and Samuel 
'Gump; deacons, Jacob Hawver, Jacob Snell, Geo. 
Zimmerman and Samuel Studebaker. There are 
now about one hundred and fifty members.' During 
this time there have been two corijmittees from An- 
nual Meeting to settle difficulties. We now have 
three points of regular preaching, with a fair attend- 
ance and interest. At no period in the history of 
ihe church was there a greater per cent of the Breth- 
ren's children in the church than now. 

Tippecanoe City, Ohio. 



Walk according to God's direction, and you will 
always be sure of God's protection. 




MRS. SYBIL JONES. 

Mrs. Sybil Jones was not a sister in the Brethren 
church and yet she had the appearance of a most de- 
vout sister. Hers is a fine face. It will do any one good 
just to look at that noble face and study it. It possess- 
es all the marks of intelligence, piety, tenderness and 
earnestness. She was a Quaker lady and often ap- 
peared in the pulpit. Elihu Burritt, in 1852, heard 
her in England, and writes this concerning her ap- 
pearance and discourse: 

"At the first word she loosed the fastenings of her bonnet, 
and as she spoke handed it down to her husband with a grace in- 
describable. There was something very impressive in the act, as 
well as the manner in which it was performed, as if she uncov- 
ered her head involuntarily in reverence to that vision of divine 
truth unsealed to her waiting eyes. And in her eyes it seemed to 
beam with a heavenly light serene, and in her heart to burn with 
holy inspiration and meekness, and to touch her lips and every 
gentle movement of her person with an expression eloquent, sol- 
emn, beautiful as her words fell upon the rapt assembly from 
the heaven of tremulous, flute-like music with which her voice 
filled the building, Like a stream welling from Mount Hermon, 
and winding its way to the sea, so flowed the melodious current 
of her message, now meandering among the unopened flowers of 
rhymeless poetry, now through green pastures of salvation, 
where the Good Shepherd was bearing in his bosom the tender 



Fortify the body against disease, by purifying all its fluids 
with Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer. You can render yourself 
practically disease-proof by the use of this great invigorant. 



"Worms burrow in decayed trees," and colds, fevers and 
diseases gain footholds in unhealthy bodies. Vapor Baths make 
you strong and well. See page 44. 



4tli Month. J 



flPRIL. 



[Days 30. 



Days & Weeks 



HO 



CO 



Remarkable 
Days. 



MOON 
Souths- 
H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Sig«8. 
5. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



Son I SXJ3>q- 
Slow Rises & Sets. 
M |h. M. I H. M. 



13] 5th Sunday in Lent. 



John 8. 



Day's length 12 hours 28 min. 



1 Sunday 

2 Mond'y 

3 Tues. 

4 Wed. 

5 Thurs. 

6 Friday 

7 Sat. 



Theodore 
Theodosia. 
Ferdinand. 
Ambrosius 
Maximus 
25'Zacclieus 
26Egesippus 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



2 


1 30 


8 37 


^10 


3 


2 27 


9 24 


^22 


4 


3 24 


10 30 


^ 4 


5 


4 21 


11 41 


**16 


6 


5 15 


morn. 


*»28 


7 


6 6 


12 38 


«io 


8 


6 54 


1 10 


«22 



$ sets 8 50 ^ 

d ? C. ? in Perihel. 

d ? (?. 3) 2 ^ 

1/: souths 3 41 ^ 
5 stationary 
?in2S 



4 


5 44 


4 


5 43 


3 


5 41 


3 


5 40 


3 


5 39 


2 


5 38 


2 


5 37 



6 1^ 
6 17 
6 19 
6 20 
6 21 
6 22 
6 23 



14] Palm Sunday. 



Matt. 29. 



Day's length 12 hours 46 min. 



8 Sunday 


27 


9 Mond'y 


28 


10 Tues. 


29 


11 Wed. 


30 


12 Thurs. 


31 


13 Friday 


A 


14 Sat. 


2 



Dyonisius 

Prochorus 

Daniel 

Julius- 

Maundy T. 

Good Frid, 

Tiburtius 



8 


7 40 


1 48 


It 4 


9 


8 23 


2 20 


*fl7 


10 


9 5 


2 54 


-ffSO 


11 


9 46 


3 21 


i*14 


11 


10 27 


3 52 


J^28 


12 


11 18 


4 24 


^^^ 13 


12 


morn. 


([rises 


jgS^ 28 



T? souths 5 18 
Sirius feets 10 30 
Orion sets 10 57 
3) in Apogee "Q 

An tares rises 10 33 
J^Spica so. 11 51 
T? stationary 



2 


5 35 


1 


5 34 


1 


5 33 


1 


5 31 





5 30 


F'St 


5 29 





5 28 



6 25 
6 26 
6 27 
6 29 
6 30 
6 31 
6 32 



15] Easter Sunday. 



Mark 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 04 min. 



15 Sunday 


3 


16 Mond'y 


4 


17 Tues. 


5 


18 Wed. 


6 


19 Thurs. 


7 


20 Friday 


8 


21 Sat. • 


9 



Easter Sun. 

Easter Mon, 

Rudolph 

JEneas 

Anicetus 

Sulpitius 

Adularius 



1 


12 8 


8 12 


«13 


2 


12 58 


8 57 


cifi28 


3 


1 36 


9 46 


^12 


4 


2 27 


10 44 


«^27 


4 


3 10 


11 42 


^11 


5 


4 5 


morn. 


^25 


6 


4 58 


12 27 


^ 9 



Regulus rises 1 4 
Rigel sets 9 3 
^ in Aphelion 

d 1/ S. D in 2 ^ 

d ^ C- O enters ^^ 
? Great. Elong W 





5 27 




5 25 




5 24 




5 23 




5 21 


2 


5 20 


2 


5 19 



6 33 
6 35 
36 
37 
39 
40 
41 



16] 1st Sunday after Easter. 



John 20. 



Day's length 13 hours 22 min. 



22 Sunday 

23 Mond'y 


10 
11 


24 Tues. 


12 


25 Wed. 


13 


26 Thurs. 


14 


27 Friday 

28 Sat. 


15 
16 



Cajus 

8t George 

Albert 

MarhEvan, 

Cletus 

Anastasius 

Vitalis 



6 


5 54 


1 10 


^22 


7 


a 47 


1 45 


» 5 


8 


7 39 


2 15 


S18 


9 


8 31 


2 42 


^ 1 


10 


9 24 


3 10 


ff*13 


11 


10 17 


3 40 


fP*25 


12 


11 12 


4 10 


^17 



? sets 9 3 
7* sets 9 5 

$ Great Hel. Lat. 

% souths 2 18 

]) in Perigee 

d ? C. d (? C 
9 Great Elong E 



N 



2 


5 18 


2 


5 17 


2 


5 15 


2 


5 14 


2 


5 13 


2 


5 12 


3 


5 11 



6 42 
6 43 
6 45 
6 46 
6 47 
6 48 
6 49 



17] 2d Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length 18 hours 38 min. 



29 Sunday 

30 Mond'y 



17 

18 



Sybilla 
Eutropius 



12 
1 



2) sets. 
8 20 






# 



T? souths 3 46 

d$ w 



10 
9 



6 50 
6 51 



IVIOOIM' 

EASTERN STATES. 
First Quarter, 6th, 3 o'clock 56 min. Even. 
Full Moon, 14th, 8 " 4 *' Even. 
Last Quarter, 22d, 9 " 35 " Morn. 



f>ma.se:s. 

CENTRAL STATES. 
3 o'clock 16 min. Even. 

7 " 24 " Even. 

8 " 55 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
2 o'clock 36 min. Even 
6 " 44 •' Even 
8 '' 15 ♦' Morn 



New Moon, 29th, 12 



25 



Morn. 28th, 11 



45 



Even. 11 



Even 



Brethren s Family Almatiac. 



13 



lambs of his flock; next it took the force of lofty diction, and fell, 
as it were, in cascades of silvery eloquence, but solemn, slow, 
and searching; adown the rocks and ravines of Sinai; then out, 
like a sweet-rolling river of music, into the wilderness, where the 
Prodigal Son, with the husks of his poverty clutched in his lean 
hands, sat in tearful meditation upon his father's home and his 
father's love. More than a thousand persons seemed to hold 
their breath as they listened to that meek, delicate woman, whose 
lips appeared to be touched to an utterance almost divine. I 
never saw an assembly so moved, but so subdued into motionless 
meditation." 

The very appearance of the woman was in keep- 
ing with what she said. How noble it is when the 
outward appearance, life and conduct of Christians 
accord with the religious principles they profess to 
believe and promulgate. It might be wise for those 
who are in the habit of giving so much attention to 
the fashion plates to study the simplicity manifested 
by Mrs. Jones, and endeavor to imitate her way rath- 
er than the ways of the world. 



NATURAL BRIDGE. 



BY F. F. HOLSOPPLE. 

At the close of our Annual Conference at Roanoke, 
Va., last May, a party composed of about sixty breth- 
ren and sisters visited the far-famed Natural Bridge. 
This marvel of nature is in Rockbridge County, two 
and one-half miles from the station which bears its 
name, on the Norfolk and Western railroad. The 
Bridge spans a deep, narrow gorge, in a spur of the 
Blue Ridge Mountains, through which flows Cedar 
Creek, a branch of the James River. 

As many of our party as could 'be accommodated 
availed themselves of the carriages which were wait- 
ing at the station for passengers. Some who re- 
mained, realizing that much time would be lost wait- 
ing for the return of the vehicles, decided to walk. 
Others preferred to walk though carriages had been 
in waiting. The road wound around hills, through 
ravines, over gorges washed by the rapid-flowing 
mountain streamlets, in an unbroken ascent, save by 
a few short declines which gave a slight rehef to the 
constant upward trend. The scenery was wild but 
beautiful. The forests clothing the hill and moun- 
tain sites were interspersed with clearings and poor- 
ly-cultivated fields. 

The log huts and cabins of the negroes and poor 
whites who inhabit the neighborhood, the blue sky 
above, flecked with fleecy clouds, stooping to meet 
the hill and mountain tops, the hum of bees gather- 
ing honey from white clover and wild flowers, the 



care-free song of birds, re-echoing through the wood- 
land glens, the slow, contented movements of the 
cattle, in field, forest, and roadside, and the long and 
curious gaze of the natives as our party in groups 
passed by, made a picture that will endure while 
memory lasts. 

After a long walk, a short decline around the side 
of a hill, through a forest overlooking a deep wooded 




valley below, brought us into full view of two large 
hotels on an eminence beyond, which told us we were 
near the object of our search. After a brief rest we 
were ready to view the attractions of the place. 

Our feelings at this time are not easily described. 
In boyhood days in school our hearts were thrilled by 
the tale entitled, "Terrific Scene at the Natural 
Bridge." Our Physical Geographies in later years 



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diyspeptic is to be miserable, hopeless, depressed, drowsy, weak 
and useless. It destroys the teeth, complexion, strength, peace 
of mind and bodily comfort. This ailment yields promptly to 
Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer. 



We guarantee to cure piles, fistula, and all diseases of the rec- 
tum. You don't pay until you are perfectly well. Read our 
"ad "on the second page of cover, and write for our 32-page 
book free to ladies, and 88-page book free to men.— Drs. Thorn- 
ton & Minor. 



5th Montli.] 



N\f\y. 



[Days 31. 



Daus & Weeks 



HO 



?1^ 



Remarkable 
Days. 



0. TO 



MOON 
Souths- 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon'5 
Signs. 
S. D. 



flspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 1 H. M. 



1 Tues. 

2 Wed. 

3 Thurs. 

4 Friday 

5 Sat. 



19 
20 
21 
22 
23 



MiiL d? Jas. 
Sigismund 
Inv. of Cross 
Florianus 
Godard 



3 


2 6 


9 52 


7r»i3 


4 


3 2 


10 42 


^25 


5 


3 56 


11 20 


m ^ 


6 


4 47 


11 58 


«19 


6 


5 34 


morn. 


« 1 



2 sets 9 7 2) m S 
d 9 C ' 

d?c?. 

1^ souths 1 39 



^ 35 7 

35 6 

n 35 5 

35 4 

35 3 



6 53 
6 54 
6 55 
6 56 

6 57 



18] 3d Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 54 min. 



6 Sunday 

7 Mond'y 

8 Tues. 

9 Wed. 

10 Thurs. 

11 Friday 

12 Sat. 



24c John Evan 

25pomicil]a 

2 6, Stanislaus 

27|job 

28,Gordianus 

29jMamertus 

30 Pancratius 



7 


6 19 


12 10 


^13 


8 


7 1 


12 56 


*r26 


9 


7 43 


1 6 


Jl 9 


9 


8 24 


1 34 


^22 


10 


9 5 


2 4 


'"^1^ t) 


11 


9 48 


2 35 


)^T^ -^1- 


11 


10 34 


3 6 


« 6 



^....T? souths 3 22 
P5 Gr. H. L. S. 
5 in Apogee 2 

Spica souths 10 12 
Antares rises 8 49 
Orion sets 9 4 
Procyon sets 10 34 



4 


5 2 


4 


5 1 


4 


5 


4 


4 59 


4 


4 58 


4 


4 57 


4 


4 56 



6 58 

6 59 

7 
7 1 
7 i^ 
7 3 
7 4 



19] 4th Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 08 min. 



13 Sunday 


M 


14 Mond'y 


2 


15 Tues. 


3 


16 Wed. 


4 


17 Thurs. 


5 


18 Friday 


6 


19 Sat. 


7 



Servatius 

Christian 

Sophia 

Peregrina 

Venantius 

Liborius 

Potentia 



12 


U 22 


3 38 


*.21 


1 


morn. 


([ rises 1^ 6 


2 


12 12 


8 30 


^21 


2 


1 6 


9- 28 


^ 6 


3 


2 1 


10 27 


^21 


4 


2 56 


11 15 


0t 5 


4 


3 50 


11 50*^19 



Arctu. so. 10 46 



'%T/$ sets 9 6 



d If ([. d liC C 
Lib.so. 1138])inS ^ 

dT?C 

Regulus rises 10 46 

Sirius sets 7 58 



4 


4 55 


4 


4 54 


4 


4 53 


4 


4 52 


4 


4 51 


4 


4 50 


4 


4 50 



5 
6 

r- 
4 

8 

9 

10 

10 



20] 5th Sunday after Easter. John 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 20 min. 



20 Sunday 

21 Mond'y 


8 
9 


22 Tues. 


10 


23 Wed. 


11 


24 Thurs. 


12 


25 Friday 

26 Sat. 


13 
14 



Torpetus 

Prudence 

Helena 

Desiderius 

Ascension 

Urbanus 

Beda 



5 


4 44 


morn. 


S£ 2 


6 


5 35 


12 14 


>ggl6 


7 


6 26 


12 52 


22^28 


8 


7 17 


1 20 


fP*10 


9 


8 8 


1 48 


fP«22 


10 


9 1 


2 10 


m 4 


11 


9 55 


2 50 


^16 



Spica so, 9 30 
enters i^ 

% souths 12 18 S 

Arcturus souths 9 17 

]) in Perigee 

T? souths 2 3 

d (^ C- ? in S 



4 


4 49 


4 


4 48 


3 


4 47 


3 


4 46 


3 


4 46 


3 


4 45 


3 


4 44 



11 

12 
13 
14 
14 
15 
16 



21] 6th Sunday after Easter. John 15. 



Day's length 14 hours 32 min. 



27 Sunday 


15 


Lucina 


11 


10 52 


3 20 


*28 


J|i.<?lfO ?s. 8 57 


3 


4 43 


7 17 


28 Mond'y 


16 


William 


12 


11 50 


]) sets. 


7f»io 


^W^^^' 0eclip. vis. 


3 


4 43 


7 17 


29 Tues. 


17 


Sybilla 


1 


12 47 


8 2.0 


7R^22 


dWC 


3 


4 42 


7 18 


30 Wed. 


18 


Wigand 


2 


1 43 


8 50 


« 4 


d ? Superior n 


3 


4 41 


7 19 


31 Thurs. 


19 


Manilius 


3 


2 36 


9 20 


«16 


d $ C- ? in Perihel. 


3 


4 41 


7 19 



EASTERN states. 
•First Quarter, 6th, 8 o'clock 41 min. Morn. 
Full Moon, Hth, 10 " 38 " Morn. 
Last Quarter, 21st, 3 " 33 " Even. 
"New Moon, 28th, 9 " 52 " Morn. 



rviooiM's f>mase:s. 

CENTRAL states. 

8 o'clock 01 min. Morn. 

9 " 58 " Morn. 
2 " 53 " Even. 
9 " 12 " Morn. 



WESTERN states. 

7 o'clock 21 min. Morn. 
9 " 18 " Morn 
2 '• 13 " Even 

8 " 32 •' Morn 



Jupiter is in opposition with the Sun on the 27th and shines all nig^ht. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



S 



told of its standing almost alone in point of structure 
as one of nature's marvels. Now a cherished wish of 
years was about to be gratified. Is it possible that in 
this experience of a life-long hope about to be real- 
ized -there should arise feelings akin to those that 
shall thrill our being with rapture when, standing in 
the presence of the Eternal Judge, we shall hear, 
"Enter thou into the joy of thy Lord " ? 

Passing through the gate, we needed no guide, as 
the well-trodden path, beaten hard by the feet of 
thousands of visitors, gave sufficient direction. The 
path led to a ravine 'cut in the bluffs by a mountain 
streamlet. A wooden stairway, followed by steps cut 
from the limestone rock which once formed the bed 
of the stream from which a cemented wall now 
serves as guard, and lastly another flight of wooden 
stairs, brought us to a winding, still descending path 
below. 

This ravine is in itself a place of romantic wildness 
and beauty. Arbor Vitcss of unknown age and the 
largest in the world are here. The streamlet dash- 
ing in cascades and rapids down its rocky bed, brok- 
en into silver spray, here and there sleeping in pel- 
lucid pools, sparkling and bright, makes one long to 
sit in the shade of the trees and gaze upon its wild 
and native beauty. But we may not tarry. As we 
pass down the path the gorge grows deeper. The 
limestone bluffs, tree crowned, with sides mantled 
with vines and ferns which find sustenance in the 
crevices of the rock, grow higher and more precipi- 
tous. Our pulses quicken with the anxiety of expec- 
tation as we keep our eyes fixed steadily on the path 
before us, so that our first impression of the Bridge 
should come from one unbroken view. 

Hearing the voices of those who preceded us we 
stopped and looked up. Before us stood the Bridge, 
majestic, sublime and beautiful in its massive 
strength. 

Two hundred and fifteen feet in height, so that Trin- 
ity church (New York) could stand in its shadow; one 
hundred and seventy feet to the keystone, so that 
Niagara Falls could stand beneath its syrrjmetrical 
arch; ninety feet in width of span, so that the traffic 
of Broadway could pour through with as ample space 
as in America's Metropolis; chiseled from one stu- 
pendous block of blue limestone, unbroken by seam 
or scar it stands a miracle in stone. 

Several theories as to its formation have been ad- 
vanced, but none seem to answer the various condi- 
tions presented, save that of a direct creative act. 
The true secret of its formation is known only to the 
Creator. According to geologists it stood long be- 
fore the continent was known to the Caucasian race. 



It was old and moss-grown when first the Indian pur- 
sued his game in the quiet glen or danced around his 
camp-fires robed in warrior's skins and decked with 
paint of war. It stood a monument of ages when 
Thebes was a mighty city and Pharaoh sat upon the 
throne of Egypt. Compared with it the Pyramids 
are but of yesterday. So old is it that in silence it 
looked upon the creative processes in the morning of 
the world. If this be true, what a history does this 
great marvel hold in its corner stone! How it would 
thrill us to hear the story of all that transpired 
around it since first its foundations were securely 
laid and its mighty arch was sprung by the hand of 
God! , 

We could only stand in admiration and wonder as 
we looked upon it. The massive walls crowned with 
verdure and draped with vines and ferns, the mur- 
muring creek flowing over its stony bed, the roaring 
of distant cascades, the sunlight struggling down 
through the branches of overhanging trees sparkling 
in the bosom of the pools below, the circling flight of 
swallows that had found a secure nesting place in the 
crevices of the bluffs and under the protecting arch 
of stone — a tabernacle of the Most High, — the cheer- 
ful springtime song of birds and the silence of the 
Bridge that yet spoke eloquently of centuries past 
and possible ages to come, called forth a flood of 
emotion that cannot be described. 

One feeling, however, predominated in the minds 
of all. It was a vivid sense of the nearness of the 
Creator. The spirit of worship was there, and when 
some one struck up the melody of that beautiful 
hymn to which every heart was already attuned, all 
joined in singing, 

" Rock of ages, cleft for me. 
Let me h:ae myself in thee." 

As the closing strains of the hymn re-echoed under 
the arch and died away through the glen, we all 
knelt down at the margin of the stream to worship 
him whose presence and power seemed so near. A 
few short addresses by members of the party voiced 
the sentiment uppermost in the minds of the speak- 
ers, and rich in thought and deep in feeling were the 
words spoken. We closed our service by singing, 

" Praise God from whom all blessings flow." 

Our company then separated into smaller groups 
who visited other points of interest in the locality. 
As we were thus engaged we became conscious that 
time was passing rapidly away, and we hastened to 
get one more view of the Bridge, this time from the 
top. We trembled as we looked down into the 
abyss where men looked like animated dolls. 



" It's a good medicine." That is the condensed opinion of 
everybody who has ever tried Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer. 
There is much contained in that homely verdict of few words. 



if you are tired of taking medicine, tired of doctor bills and 
drugs, use the Vapor Baths. See page 44 and send for booklet 



6th Month. 








JUNE). 






[Days 30. 


Days & Weeks 


5^ 


Remarkable 
Days. 


H 


MOOfl 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & S«ts 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 


Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu- 


San 
Fast 
M. 


su3sr 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. i H. M 


1 Friday 

2 Sat. 


20 
21 


Nicodemus 
Marcellus 


4 
5 


3 26 

4 12 


9 50 
10 20 




$}^Q. $ Gr. bri. r^ 
Arcturus so. 9 27 


2 4 40 7 20 
2 4 40 7 20 



22] Whitsuntide. 



John 14. 



Day's length 14 hours 40 min. 



3 Sunday 

4 Mond'y 

5 Tues. 

6 Wed. 

7 Thurs. 

8 Friday 

9 Sat. 



22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 



Whit Sun. 
Whit Man. 
Bonifacius 
Emherday 
Lucretia 
Medardus 
Barnimus 



6 


4 56 


10 48 


^22 


7 


5 38 


11 50 


^ 5 


8 


6 19 


morn. 


J^18 


8 


7 40 


12 30 


^ 1 


9 


8 33 


1 4 


)^^ 15 


10 


9 27 


1 51 


^5^ jy 


11 


10 14 


2 46 


si6i4 



22 $ sets 8 48 

Spica souths 8 27 
]) in Apogee S 
V'- rises 2 40" 

% souths 11 7 
Procyon sets 8 41 



2 


4 39 


2 


4 38 


2 


4 38 


2 


4 37 


1 


4 37 


1 


4 37 


1 


4 36 



21 
22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
24 



23] Trinity Sunday. 



John 3. 



Day's length 14 hours 48 min. 



10 Sunday 


29 


11 Mond> 


30 


12 Tues. 


31 


13 Wed. 


J 


14. Thurs. 


2 


15 Friday 


3 


16 Sat. 


4 



Flavins 

Barnabas 

Basilides 

Tobias 

Corpus Chr 

Vitus 

Rolandus 



12 


11 10 


3 8 


mfi29 


12 


11 50 


3 48 


*^14 


1 


morn. 


2) rises 


^29 


2 


12 48 


8 24 


^14 


3 


1 44 


9 34 


^29 


3 


2 39 


10 15 


^13 


4 


3 19 


10 42 


^27 



])mS 



Eclipsed 
Visible 



? G. H. L. N. 

d T? ([ U 

Regulus sets 1113 
$ stationary 
$ sets 8 7 



1 


4 36 


1 


4 36 


1 


4 35 


o 


4 35 


slow 


4 35 





4 35 





4 35 



24 
24 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 



24] 1st Sunday after Trinity. Luke 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 50 min. 



17 Sumday 

18 Mond'y 

19 Tues: 

20 Wed. 

21 Thurs. 

22 Friday 

23 Sat. 



St. Albans 
6 Arnolphus 
Gervasius 
Sylvarius 
Raphael 
Achatius 
Agrippina 



7 

8 

9 

10 

11 



5 


3 56 


11 10 


JSll 


5 


4 24 


11 44 


S24 


6 


5 14 


morn. 


fl« 7 


7 


6 5 


12 10 


fl*19 


8 


6 56 


12 44 


1* 1 


8 


7 49 


1 10 


^13 


9 


8 43 


1 43 


tf*25 



Spica sets 1 1 
d^0. ]) in Perigee 
~ ? in S 

Altair so. 1 47 

O enters i^sVXlll^ 

d $ ? 

(?b0 






4 35 





4 35 


1 


4 35 


1 


4 35 


1 


4 34 


2 


4 35 


2 


4 35 



25 
25 
25 
25 
26 
25 
25 



25] 2d Sunday after Trinity. 


Luke 14. 


Day's length 14 hours 50 min. 


24 Sunday 


12 


John Bapt. 


10 


9 39 


2 24 


fk 7 


d c? C. ]) in S 


2 


4 35 


7 25 


25 IMond'y 


13 


Elogius 


11 


10 36 


3 6 


*»19 


^^li souths 9 49 


2 


4 35 


7 25 


26 Tues. 


14 


Jeremiah 


12 


11 32 


2) sets. 


« 1 


'^P'd U C ^ 


3 


4 35 


7 25 


27 Wed. 


15 


7 Sleepers 


1 


12 26 


8 5 


«13 


Regulus sets 10 20 


3 


4 35 


7 25 


28 Thurs. 


16 


Leo 


2 


1 17 


8 50 


«25 


d ? c 


3 


4 35 


7 25 


29 Friday 


17 


Peter&Paul 


3 


2 5 


9 20 


«r 6 


d$c 


3 


4 35 


7 25 


30 Sat. 


18 


Lucian 


3 


2 50 


9 52 


<efl9 


Vega souths 11 56 


3 


4 35 


7 25 



EASTERN STATES. 



rviooN's f>mase:s. 

central states. 



First Quarter, 5th, 2 o'clock 01 min. Morn. 
Full Moon, 12th, 10 " 40 " Even. 
Last Quarter, 19th, 7 " 59 " Even. 
New Moon, 26th, 8 " 29 " Even. 



1 o'clock 21 min. Morn. 

10 " 00 " Even. 

7 " 19 " Even. 

7 " 49 " Even. 



WESTERN STATES. 

12 o'clock 41 min. Morn 
9 " 20 " Even 

6 " 39 " Even 

7 " 09 " Even 



Saturn is in opposition with the Sun on the 23d and shines all night. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



17 



Around us on every hand was grandeur. To the 
north the mountains rose above us. To the south the 
gorge deepened and widened as it neared the valley 
of the James river. All around are mountains sug- 
gestive of strength and endurance, the Peaks of Otter, 
like grim and silent sentinels, keeping watch over all. 
As we gazed upon the wondrous scene we instinctive- 
ly looked up, and the words, "Marvelous are thy 
works, and that my soul knoweth right well," flashed 
through my mind. 

As we turned away we realized that we had spent a 
day with Nature in one of her strongest moods, which 
to the Christian heart means a day with God. 

Far kerf or d, Fa. 



ELDER Q. C. BOWMAN, OF TENNESSEE. 
CHARACTER SKETCH. 



BY M. NEAD. 

In the death of Eld. G. C. Bowman a strong man 
has gone from among us. And though months have 
elapsed since he passed away, a notice of some of 
the leading elements that entered into his make-up 
as a man and as a Christian may not, even now, be 
without interest, and profitable consideration. 

As a descendant of a family, prominent in the past 
history of the Brotherhood in Tennessee, among the 
lineal descendants of which were a number who were 
talented quite above the ordinary mass of men, he 
appears in a personality in some respects unique and 
peculiar. 

He was born in the year 1832, on Carroll Creek, 
Washington County, Tenn., where he spent the early 
years of his life under the religious influence and 
teaching of the Brethren. In the year i860 he mar- 
ried Anne Hylton, daughter of Eld. Austin Hylton. 
In the autumn of this year he and his companion 
were received into the membership of the Brethren 
church. Within a year or two from his baptism into 
the body of Christ he was chosen to the ministry. In 
the work of preaching, his growth into efficiency and 
power was gradual and steady. 

He engaged at once in the work to which he had 
been called. His first efforts in public, which we 
ivell remember, were much like those of one en- 
gaged in ordinary conversation, — without any appar- 
ent effort in delivery, and entirely without that zeal 
ind enthusiasm that characterized his preaching in 
ater years. But there was something in his public 
:alks that indicated his methods of study^ and gave 
promise and evidence of growth and development. 



His preaching, at the first as well as in later years, 
consisted almost entirely of Scriptural quotations, 
with such comments as he could give. Fullness and 
accuracy of quotation were quite apparent in all his 
efforts. 

From these earlier years of his life work down to the 
time of his death three prominent traits appear con- 
spicuous in his character. And they evidently were 
the source or means of his power among men. 
These were, first, he was an untiring student of the 
Scriptures; second, he was a man of much faith; 
third, he was much given to prayer. 

In his reading and study of the Scriptures his nat- 
urally retentive memory was taxed to the utmost, so 
that in time he acquired a wonderful fund of Scrip- 
tural knowledge, which readily served him and made 
him ready to preach at any time that it seemed re- 
quired of him. Had he in his earlier years been 
trained to habits of analysis and to that close discrim- 
ination in the use of terms, and in the application of 
Scriptural truth, that is always effective in religious 
discourse, he would indeed have grown into a man 
of wonderful power in the pulpit. 

His method of study was to take the leading 
points of a subject, and by searching the references 
he would gather all the Scriptures in any way bear- 
ing on those points. So he was always full in quota- 
tion, and rarely failed to be accurate. He was much 
given to preaching on the first principles of the doc- 
trine of Christ. In fact, his sermons were usually 
full of the terms of salvation, and the conditions of 
pardon. So, where he was well known, his preach- 
ing, to some, seemed to be somewhat routine, and to 
some extent wanting in variety and that wide range 
of thought that a more thorough training and cul- 
ture in early life would have given. But in new 
fields his sermons ever made a marked impression 
on his hearers. So as an evangelist, for preaching 
the doctrines of Christ on the outskirts, and in the 
waste places, his worth to the District was invalua- 
ble. 

He read and studied the Scriptures with the view 
of preaching them as the divine Word, because of 
his faith in the life-giving power of that Word; for 
he was a man of much faith. Few men in their 
preaching had a deeper and more abiding faith in 
the effectiveness of the Word to produce results than 
he, and few had a more unfaltering trust in the 
promises contained in that Word. He never was in 
the habit of relating sensational incidents, or in any 



Rheumatism is a painful disease, characterized by an in- 
lamed state of the fibrous tissue. It principally affects the 
arger points and places covered by the muscles. Dr. Peter's 
Jlood Vitalizer removes the uric acid in the blood and cures 
heumatism. 



H. E. Newcomer, of Mt. Morris, III., sells more watches 
among the Brethren than probably any other jeweler in the 
world. He has advertised continually for four years, issues a 
handsome catalogue, sells good watches and sells them cheap. 
It will pay you to write to him for price-list. 



7 th Month. 



JULY. 



[Days 31. 



Days & Weeks 






Remarkable 
Days. 



MOON 

Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon'5 
Signs. 
S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 



Rises & Sets. 
H. M. I H. M. 



26] 3d Sunday after Trinity. Luke 15. 



Day's length 14 hours 48 min. 



1 Sunday 

2 Mond'y 

3 Tues. 

4 Wed. 

5 Thurs. 

6 Friday 

7 Sat. 



19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 
25 



Theobald 
Visit V.M. 
Cornelius 
Independ. 
Demetrius 
John Huss 
Edulburga 



4 


3 33 


10 28 


M 2 


5 


4 15 


10 57 


^14 


6 


4 56 


11 20 


^28 


6 


5 38 


11 55 


^11 


7 


6 20 


morn. 


^25 


8 


7 5 


12 30 


« 9 


9 


7 53 


1 5 


«22 



H souths 9 23 n 
© in Aphelion S 
3) in Apogee 

P T? souths 11 10 
7* rises 1 10 
Vega souths 11 22 



4 


4 36 


4 


4 36 


4 


4 37 


4 


4 37 


4 


4 38 


4 


4 38 


5 


4 38 



24 

24 
23 
23 
22 

22 
22 



27j 4th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 6. 



Day's length 14 hours 44 min. 



8 Sunday 

9 Mond'y 


26 

27 


,0 Tues. 
11 Wed.'' 


28 
29 


12 Thurs. 


30 


13 Friday 

14 Sat. 


J 

2 



Aquilla 

Zeno 

J. Calvin 

Pius 

Henry 

Margaret 

Bonavent 



9 


8 44 


1 45 


m 8 


10 


9 38 


2 14 


j^23 


11 


10 35 


2 54 


m 8 


12 


11 32 


3 20 


^23 


1 


morn. 


([rises 


^ 8 


2 


12 29 


8 30 


^.22 


2 


1 24 


9 7 


35 6 



dl(C» d$0lnferior 
6y^V ^ ill Aphelion 
d T? C. D in S ^ 
Arcturus sets 1 58 
J^ Orion rises 3 51 
Regulus s. 9 14 
5 in Aphelion 



5 


4 39 


5 


4 39 


5 


4 40 


5 


4 40 


5 


4 41 


5 


4 41 


5 


4 42 



21 
21 
20 
20 
19 
19 
18 



28] 5th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 5. 



Day's length 14 hours 36 min. 



15 Sunday 

16 Mond'y 

17 Tues. 

18 Wed. 

19 Thurs. 

20 Friday 

21 Sat. 



S^ipostles^ da. 
Hilary 
Alexius 
Maternus 
Ruffina 
Elias 
Praxedes 



3 


2 18 


9 48 


3519 


4 


3 10 


10 20 


fP* 3 


5 


4 2 


10 50 


ff*16 


6 


4 53 


11 10 


fP*28 


7 


5 46 


11 47 


^10 


7 


6 39 


morn. 


^22 


8 


7 34 


12 20 


^.4 



3) in Perigee 

7* rises 12 30 S 

^ stationary 

Altair souths 11 52 

<^ in 8 

1? souths 10 6 
1^ souths 8 0. JinS 



6 


4 43 


6 


4 44 


6 


4 45 


6 


4 46 


6 


4 46 


6 


4 47 


6 


4 47 



17 
16 
15 
14 
14 
13 
13 



29] 6th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 5. 



Day's length 14 hours 25 min. 



22 Sunday 


10 


23 Mond'y 


11 


24 Tues. 


12 


25 Wed. 


13 


26 Thurs. 


14 


27 Friday 


15 


28 Sat. 


16 



Ma7y Mag, 

Apollinar. 

Christiana 

St. James 

St. Anna 

Martha 

Pantaleon 



9 


8 29 


1 1 


*»16 


10 


9 25 


1 44 


*»28 


11 


10 19 


2 37 


«io 


12 


11 10 


3 40 


«22 


1 


11 59 


])sets. 


<et 4 


2 


12 45 


7 51 


^16 


3 


1 29 


8 12 


(^29 



d c? C* O enters (gf 
dtpc*$in Apheli. n 

d ?C 

MJk Pollux sets 8 19 
%;|jlF Orion rises 3 2 
d^C. Spicasetsl0 18 
Antares sets 10 16 



6 


4 48 


6 


4 49 


6 


4 50 


6 


4 51 


6 


4 52 


6 


4 52 


6 


4 53 



7 12 
7 11 
7 10 
7 9 

7 8 
7 8 
7 7 



30] 7th Sunday after Trinity. Mark 8. 



Day's length 14 hours 14 min. 



29 Sunday 

30 ]\iond'y 

31 Tues. 



17|Beatrix 

18|Upton 

19Germanus 



2 11 

2 53 

3 34 



8 47 

9 10 
9 44 



^11 



$ stationary 
T? souths 9 25 
5 in Apogee 



6 


4 54 


6 


4 55 


6 


4 56 



IVIOOIM': 

EASTERN STATES. 
First Quarter, 4th, 7 o'clock 15 min. Even. 
Full Moon, 12th, 8 "24 " Even. 
Last Quarter, 19th, 12 " 33 " Even. 
New Moon, 26th, 8 " 45 " Morn. 



CENTRAL STATES. WESTERN STATES. 

6 o'clock 35 min. Even. 5 o'clock 55 min. Even 

7 " 44 " Even. 7 " 04 " Even 
11 " 53 " Morn. 11 " 13 " Morn 

8 " 05 " Morn. 7 " 25 " Morn 



Venus is in Inferior Conjunction with the Sun on the 8th and changes fronr even, to morn, stai 



BrethretLS Family Alma?:ac. 



19 



way attempting to stir the hearts of his hearers, save 
through the simple teaching of the Word. 

His abiding faith in God and the promises of his 
Word made him truly a man much given to prayer; 
for he certainly leaned heavily on him in whom he 
believed. Often he was heard to say that he ever 
sought a throne of mercy and grace before starting 
on a journey or engaging in any work of moment. 
This prayerful spirit, this sense of dependence on 
and confiding trust in the unseen hand of God, was 
with him in his every-day life. Whether he was en- 
gaged in the work of the ministry or in enjoying the 
associations of home and friends, he was the ever 
same praying man. 

The later years of his life were given entirely to 
the work of preaching, and the burden of his thoughts 
was in line with his work. So when his last sickness 
came, in the delirium of his last days, his ebbing 
energies were given to repeating passages of Scrip- 
ture, to apparent efforts at preaching, and to prayer. 

On whom may his mantle fall, and who may 
worthily bear that mantle? 



FARMER^ JOHN ON HUNTING FOXES. 



The Samson mentioned in the Bible was the 
greatest fox hunter I ever read about. He caught 
300, tied firebrands to their tails, and let them run 
through the ripe wheat fields of the Philistines. I 
guess these Philistines never before saw fire spread 
so fast, and it was done so quickly that most of them 
did not know what had happened. 

There are people these days who hunt foxes, and 
find them too, and sometimes do with them more mis- 
chief than Samson did. Some of these people will 
even hunt foxes on Sunday. I have known them to 
go to meeting and look all around over the house to 
see how many foxes they could find. You may think 
this is not a very nice way for people to do. Well, 
it is not, still some who think themselves very nice 
do it. 

I have noticed that these persons find more foxes 
on other people's places than on their own. In fact 
I never knew a man of this kind to spend time on 
his own place looking for foxes. I do not know why 
this is, but everybody knows that it is so. Sometimes 
they do not seem to have time to hunt for the little 
creatures around their own homes, but they have 
plenty of time to go all over the neighborhood in 
search of foxes. 

Then I have noticed that it is the little foxes that 
spoil the vines, as Solomon says; and while these 
people were away from home hunting their neigh- 



bors' foxes, the little foxes were spoiling their own 
vines. Rut the most remarkable thing is, that not 
one man in ten can see a fox among his own vines, 
though he may see them by the dozen, just across the 
lane, in his neighbor's vineyard. 

We would not have anything to say if these fox: 
hunters would kill all the foxes they find in the 
neighborhood, and thus help get rid of them. In- 
stead of that they see how many of them they can 
get and then make pets of them, and every time any 
one comes along they get their pets out and shov' 
them, telling just where they got each one. You wil 
find people who have nearly as many pet foxes a; 
Samson caught, and if they would dare to do it, thej 
would let them loose and set the whole neighborhood 
on fire. If it was the law for each man to pay tax on 
•each fox he keeps to show to visitors, the government 
would not need to levy a tax on anything else. It 
would in that way get more money than it would 
know what to do with. 

Some people know more about their collection of 
foxes than they do about their Bibles. They could 
not talk ten minutes about what is in the Book, but, 
if you listen that long, they can talk to you all day 
about their foxes. If it was to save their life they 
could not narrate to you the life of Moses, but with- 
out any special effort they can tell you in detail the 
history of nearly every fox in the neighborhood. 

But if you want to find out how little a man can 
know when he wants to appear ignorant, just get him 
to tell you about his own foxes. You will be aston- 
ished at how little he knows on that subject. This is 
the best way I know of putting an end to a conversa- 
tion on fox hunting. It is here that most people 
think that ignorance is the best policy. By foxes I 
mean faults. ▼ 

LORD AND CHURCH. 



Bishop Watterson, of Nebraska, was once mis- 
taken for a traveling salesman by a commercial trav- 
eler who met him in a railway train, says the Chris- 
tian Endeavor World. 

"Do you represent a big house? " asked the trav- 
eler of the bishop. 

" Biggest on earth," replied the bishop. 

" What's the name of the fi^r^ii' " 

" Lord & Church." 

"Hum!" 'Lord & Church.' Never heard of it. 
Got branch houses anywhere? " 

"Branch houses all over the world." 

" That's queer. Never heard of 'em. Is it boots 
and shoes?" 

"No." 

"Oh! dry goods, I suppose." 

"Yes, they call my sermons that sometimes." 



Keep the head cool, the feet warm, and the bowels normal, 
by an occasional dose of Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer and you 
will stand a pretty good chance of keeping well. 



If afflicted with any disease of the rectum, or female diseases 
don't fail to read our "ad" on second page of cover.— Drr. 
Thornton & Minor. . 



8th Month.] 



AUGUST. 



[Days 31. 



Days & Weeks 


:2? 


Remarkable 


1.^ 


MOON 

Souths. 


MOON 

aises & Sets 


Moon's 
Signs. 


ftspects of Planets, and 


SUD 

Slow 


sxjnsr 

Rises & Sets. 




^^ 


Daiis. 


H 


H. M. 


H. M. 


5. D. 


Otlfer Miscellanu. 


M. 


H. M. |H. M. 


1 Wed. 


20 


Lammas dy 


5 


4 16 


10 ll'^22 


d ^ O inferior n 


6 


4 57 


7 3 


2 Thurs. 


21 


Augustus 


6 


4 59 


10 48;c|g 6 


% souths 7 16 


6 


4 58 


7 2 


3 Friday 


22 


Dominick 


6 


5 45 


11 7 


MR 19 


^^ G. H. L, S, 

>^^T2 souths 9 4 


6 


4 59 


7 1 


4 Sat. 


23 


Stephen 


7 


6 34 


11 4!^ 3 


6 


5 


7 



31] 8th Sunday after Trinity. 


Matt. 


7. 


Day's length 14 hours 00 min. 


5 Sunday 


24 


Oswald 


8 


7 25 


morn. 


^18 


dl/C^dW^^ingJv^ 


6 


5 1 


6 59 


6 Mond'y 


25 


Tr.of Christ 


9 


8 20 


12 4 


^ 2 


Spica sets 9 38 


6 


5 2 


6 58 


7 Tues. 


26 


Godfrey 


10 


9 16 


1 8 


^1'? 


6'h<L.6S^ 


5 


5 3 


6 57 


8 Wed. 


27 


Emilius 


11 


10 13 


2 14 


^ 2 


Vega souths 9 19 


5 


5 4 


6 56 


9 Thurs. 


28 


Ericusj 


12 


11 9 


3 20 


^1^ 


7* rises 10 56 


5 


5 5 


6 55 


10 Friday 


29 


St. Lawren. 


12 


morn. 


])rises 


^30 


£^^ stationary 


5 


5 6 


6 54 


11 Sat. 


30 


Titus 


1 


12 5 


7 10 


S14 


^^? rises 3 7 


5 


5 7 


6 53 



32] 9th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 45 min. 



12 Sunday 

13 Mond'y 

14 Tues. 

15 Wed. 

16 Thurs. 

17 Friday 

18 Sat. 



31 
A 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



Clara 

Hildebert 

Eusebius 

Assn. K M. 

Rochus 

Bertram 

Agapetus 



2 


1 


7 40 


SS?27 


3 


1 53 


8 10 


f^ll 


3 


2 47 


8 41 


f*24 


4 


3 40 


9 10 


^ 6 


5 


4 35 


9 48 


tf*18 


6 


5 3010 20 


fl*30 


7 


6 26111 4 


«|12 



]) in Perigee Q 

Arcturus sets 1 20 
$ greatest brilliancy 
$ Gr. Hel Lat. S. 
Vega souths 8 50 
}^ stationary 
T?so. 8 7 ])in8 



5 


5 9 


4 


5 10 


4 


5 11 


4 


5 12 


4 


5 13 


4 


5 14 


3 


5 15 



6 51 
6 50 
6 49 
6 48 
6 47 
6 46 
6 45 



33] 10th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 19. 



Day's length 13 hours 30 min. 



19 Sunday 

20 Mond'y 

21 Tues. 

22 Wed. 

23 Thurs. 

24 Friday 

25 Sat. 



7 Sebaldus 



8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 



Bernard 

Rebecca 

Philibert 

Zaccheus 

St, Barthol, 

Ludovicus 



8 


7 21 


morn. 


«t24 


9 


8 15 


12 10^ 6 


10 


9 7 


1 4 


«18 


11 


9 56 


3 3 


«30 


11 


10 42 


4 10 


*tl2 


12 


11 27 


3) sets. 


*r25 


1 


12 9 


6 54 


M 8 



dq;([. $Gr,El.w. r\ 
6 S(L 

d ? C O enters ^ 
9 rises 3 3 
nl/0. 7/S0.5 47 



3 


5 17 


3 


5 18 


2 


5 19 


2 


5 20 


2 


5 21 


2 


5 23 


2 


5 24 



6 43 
6 42 
6 41 
6 40 
6 39 
6 37 
6 36 



34] 11th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 18. 



Day's length 13 hours 12 min. 



26 Sunday 

27 Mond'y 

28 Tues. 

29 Wed. 
80 Thurs. 
31 Friday 



14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 



Samuel 

Gebhard 

St.Augustin 

St John beh, 

Benjamin 

Paulinus 



1 


12 51 


7 25 


^21 


2 


1 32 


7 58 


^5^ o 


3 


2 14 


8 34 


)^^ 18 


4 


2 56 


9 10 


m 2 


4 


3 41 


10 6 


«i7 


5 


4 28 


10 40 


m 1 



Orion rises 1 13 S 
^in Perih. 3) in Apo. 
Arcturus sets 10 52 
Antares sets 10 11 
7* rises 9 37 
T? souths 7 15 



2 


5 25 


1 


5 26 


1 


5 27 


1 


5 29 





5 30 





5 31 



6 35 
6 34 
6 33 
6 31 
6 30 
6 29 



EASTERN STATES. 

First Quarter, 3d, 11 o'clock 47 min. 
FuU Moon, 10th, 4 "32 
Last Quarter, 17th, 6 " 48 
New Moon, 24th, 10 " 54 



IVIOON'S 


F>IHASES. 






CENTRAL STATES. 


WESTERN STATES. 


n. Morn. 


11 o'clock 07 min. Morn. 


10 o'clock 27 min. Morn 


Even. 


3 " 52 " Even. 


3 " 12 " Even 


Morn. 


6 " 08 " Morn. 


5 " 28 " Morn 


' P>en. 


10 " 14 *' Even. 


9 "34 " Even 



Brethreris Family Almanac, 



21 



DEVOTIONAL. 



BY I. B. TROUT. 



MEDITATION. 



Some one has said, " Meditation is the daughter of 
retirement and the mother of piety." From the 
practical point this is true. If any one would learn 
to love God more, let him retire from the noisy, busy 
scenes of life, for a season each day, and there medi- 
tate upon his great need and upon the wonderful 
love that God manifested toward us in giving his 
Son for us when we were yet sinners. Let him con- 
sider what would be his condition and what his hope, 
if cut off from the mercy of God. Let him consider 
the awful issues of death if it were, not for the love of 
the Savior. Let him anticipate the joys of the saints 
in glory. 

MORNING PRAYER. 

Thou most holy and righteous Father, the Father 
of our Lord Jesus Christ, our hearts go out to thee 
in gratitude for thy loving kindness in preserving us 
through the shades of the night. We thank thee for 
the calm rest of the night, and for the light and the 
blessings of the new day which we now enter by thy 
grace. May our hearts be open to the purifying in- 
iluences of thy Word, as our eyes are open to the 
beauties of the morning. Holy Father, we pray thee 
to give us grace ifor this day's duties; fill us with thy 
wisdom; anoint us with the Holy Spirit; and warm 
and inspire our hearts with thy love. Help us to use 
thy blessings to thy glory, and to the praise of the 
blessed Savior. We pray thee to remember all thy 
children and strengthen them to walk with thee. 
Help us to lead sinners to thee, the fountain of life. 
And when the shades of death are upon us, let the 
glorious light of the eternal day dispel the darkness, 
as the brightness of this new morning has conquered 
the shades of the night. We ask in the name of the 
Lord Jesus Christ, our Savior. Amen. 

EVENING PRAYER, 

O Lord, our Father, in the name of thy Son, our 
Savior, we come before the throne of grace as the 
daylight fades out and the shades of night gather us 
into their folds. With mingled feelings of joy and 
sadness do we come to offer our evening sacrifice. 
With joy, because thou hast so richly blessed us this 
day; with sadness, because we have not lived nearer 
to thee and done more in thy service. But we ask 
thee to remember thy great love for thy children, 
and in the plenitude of thy mercy to forgive our 
errors. While the flame of love is burning on the 



altar of our hearts and as we offer our thanksgivings 
and praises thereon, oh! do thou come very near us 
and accept our weak tribute as the best that we are 
able to do. O Lord, as thou hast filled this day with 
rich blessings, so do thou fill our lives with the riches 
of thy grace, and enable us to carry thy goodness to 
the children of men. Help us to close our eyes in 
sleep this night in faith in thee and in thy promises. 
Let the holy angels keep watch over us. But if it 
seemeth good to thee to call us hence before the 
morning dawn, then do thou receive us home to thy- 
self in glory, we humbly plead in Jesus' name. 
Amen. 

SECRET PRAYER. 

O thou most holy Father in heaven, do thou help 
me to close the door of my closet and to be alone 
with thee, and to talk with thee in the name of my 
blessed Jesus who loved me and gave himself for me. 
Hide thou me in the secret of thy tabernacle while 
I pray to thee, the God of heaven. Oh, help me that 
nothing carnal may intrude while I draw near to 
thee. O thou eternal Father, I do thank thee for the 
richness and fullness of thy blessings. Accept the 
thanks that I bring for the gift of thy Son. L thank 
thee that thou hast pardoned my sins, and washed 
me in Jesus' blood; and that thou hast taken from me 
my filthy rags and clothed me in thine own right- 
eousness. Oh, do thou fill me with the joys of thy 
salvation and uphold me with thy free spirit. Lord, 
take all selfishness away from me, and fill me with 
thy love. Help me to be a light in the world, show- 
ing forth the light of thy countenance, that sinners 
may be converted to thee. O Lord, help me to lead 
children to thee. Consecrate me fully to thy service, 
and prepare me for every good work. Open mine 
eyes to behold the beauty of thy majesty. Let there 
be a deeper work of grace in my heart, that I may be 
filled with divine wisdom, and walk in all the ways 
of God. Blessed Master, when I go from this place 
let me never forsake the right way, but always bear 
the fruit of the Spirit. Support me in temptation, 
that I fall not. And when the day and journey of 
life is ended, oh, may I fall asleep in Jesus, and in 
the glorious morning of eternity see him as he is and 
be like him, and reign with hirn forever, where thou, 
Father, art all and in all. Let these rich blessings 
be mine forever, through Christ my Lord. Amen. 

TABLE PRAYER. 

Lord, as we come to this table our hearts go out 
in gratitude to thee. We know that from thy liberal 
hand all our returning wants are supplied. We ask 
thy blessing upon this meal. Feed our souls with 



This is an age of skepticism and unbelief. Dr. Peter's 
Blood Vitalizer has won over and made friends of many skeptics 
who were sick and in distress. 



We want you to investigate our standing and ability. Read 
what the Brethren think of us on second page of cover.— Drs. 
Thornton & Minor. 



9th Month. 








SEPTEMBER. 




[Days 30. 


Days & Weeks 


<y> 


Remarkable 
Days. 


2. TO 

H 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 


nspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 


iSan 
Slow 
M. 


Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Sat. 20 


Egidus 6 


5 1711 ib^nny^Q.dlKL.DinQ.rs 





5 33 6 27 



35] 12th Sunday after Trinity. Mark 7. 



Day's length 12 hours 54 min. 



2 Sunday 


21 


Eliza 


7 


6 8 


11 49 


S^29 


'^^c5 3itC- Testation. 


1 


5 34 


6 26 


3 Mond'y 


22 


Mansuetus 


8 


7 2 


morn. 


^13 


^d T? C ^ 


1 


5 35 


6 25 


4 Tues. 


23 


Moses 


9 


7 57 


12 44 


^27 


% souths 5 11 


1 


5 36 


6 24 


.6 Wed. 


24 


Nathaniel 


9 


8 53 


1 56 


^11 


$ rises 2 57 


1 


5 37 


6 23 


6 Thurs. 


25 


Magnus 


10 


9 48 


2 52 


^25 


Sirius rises 3 32 


2 


5 39 


6 21 


7 Friday 


26 


Regina 


11 


10 43 


3 40 


^ 9 


? Gr. Hel. Lat. K 


2 


5 40 


6 20 


8 Sat. 


27 


mt. V. M, 


12 


11 38 


4 20 


2£22 


Rigel rises 12 18 S 


2 


5 41 


6 19 



36] 13th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 10. 



Day's length. 12 hours 38 min. 



9 Sunday 


28 


10 Mond'y 


29 


11 Tues. 


30 


12 Wed. 


31 


13 Thurs. 


S 


14 Friday 


2 


15 Sat. 


3 



Bruno 

Pulcheria 

Protus 

J, WicMife 

Amatus 

£Jlev. Holy f 

Nicetus 



12 


morn. 


([rises 


ft* 6 


1 


12 33 


6 34 


f?*19 


2 


1 28 


7 26 


m ^2 


3 


2 24 


8 40 


^14 


4 


3 21 


9 30 


^26 


5 


4 19 


10 10 


^ 8 


6 


5 15 


10 55 


^20 



^^^]) in Perigee 
^Regu. s. 11 25 
Orion rises 12 
Antares sets 9 20 
d ? O superior 

7*r. 2 58])inS 
$ r. 2 55 n 



3 


5 43 


3 


5 44 


3 


5 45 


4 


5 47 


4 


5 48 


5 


5 49 


5 


5 50 



6 17 
6 16 
6 15 
6 l3 
6 12 
6 11 
6 10 



37] 14th Sunday after Trinity. Matt 6. 



Day's length 12 hours 20 min. 



16 Sunday 

17 Mond'y 

18 Tues. 

19 Wed. 

20 Thurs. 

21 Friday 

22 Sat. 



4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



Euphemia 

Lambertus 

Siegfried 

Emberday 

Jonas 

St. Matthew 

Maurice 



7 


6 11 


11 40 


m 2 


8 


7 3 


morn. 


«14 


9 


7 53 


12 40 


«26 


9 


8 41 


1 37 


^ 8 


10 


9 25 


2 37 


*f2Q 


11 


10 8 


3 40 


^ 3 


12 


10 50 


4 44 


^16 



d wc 

? Gr. El W. 

d $ ([ 

Procyon sets 9 26 
T? souths 5 54 

n T? 0. n t|; s 



5 


5 52 


6 


5 53 


6 


5 54 


7 


5 56 


7 


5 57 


7 


5 58 


8 


5 59 



8 
7 
6 
4 
3 
2- 
1 



38] 15th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 6. 



Day's length 12 hours 02 min. 



23 Sunday 


11 


24 Mond'y 


12 


25 Tues. 


13 


26 Wed. 


14 


27 Thurs. 


15 


28 Friday 


16 


29 Sat. 


17 



Hosea 

St. John con. 

Cleophas 

Justina 

Cosmus 

Wenceslaus 

St. Michael 



12 


11 31 


]) sets. 


J^30 


1 


12 13 


6 18 


^14 


2 


12 55 


6 50 


^5% 28 


2 


1 39 


7 33 


«13 


3 


2 25 


8 18 


«37 


4 


3 13 


9 12 


^11 


5 


4 3 


10 14 


^25 



OoiTi cJLrD&N equal 
eU.^^utunjQ b's. 

iPd ? C 

Fomalhaut so. 10 42 
x\ntares sets 8 32 
Orion rises 1 9 
11 so. 3 50. ]) in S 



8 


6 


8 


6 2 


8 


6 3 


9 


6 4 


9 


6 6 


9 


6 7 


10 


6 8 





58 
57 
56 
54 
53 
52 



39] 16th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 7. 



Day's length 11 hours 44 min. 



30 Sunday |18|Jerome | 6| 4 54|11 20|^|_9|dJ^ 



|10|6 10|5 50 



EASTERN STATES. 
First Quarter, 2d, 2 o'clock 68 min, 
Full Moon, 9th, 12 *' 08 

Last Quarter, 15th, 3 "59 
New Moon, 23d, 2 "59 



IS/IOON'S 


RMASEIS. 






CENTRAL STATES. 


WESTERN STATES. 


n. Morn. 


2 o'clock 18 min. Morn. 


1 o'clock 38 min. Morn 


' Even. 


11 " 28 " Morn. 


10 " 48 " Morn 


Even. 


3 " 19 " Even. 


2 " 39 " Even 


Even. 


2 " 19 " Even. 


1 «' 39 " Even. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



23 



spiritual food. Do thou help us to use our strength 
m thy holy service; and finally give each of us a 
place with the redeemed in the New Jerusalem. We 
ask it all in the name of our Savior. Amen. 



"HOW MAY A MOTHER EXERT A GOOD 
INFLUENCE OVER HER BOY?" 



BY NANCY D, UNDERHILL. 

First, it is important tt begin very early. If we 
wish to have a tall, straight and beautiful tree, and 
the tree is somewhat crooked, we must straighten it 
while young and tender, or we never can. But all 
our efforts will never make a silver leaf maple of a 
scrubby jack oak, or a stately elm of a thorny cactus. 
If we desire an oak, we plant an acorn; if a peach, 
■we plant a peach. So, if we would plant great, 
1-eautiful trees of life in God's garden of souls, we 
should begin before conception: we should plant only 
seeds of purity, love, honesty, and godliness. Nev- 
ertheless, regarding trees already planted, proper 
care and wise grafting may bring excellent rfesults. 

The next thing after planting a tree, is properly to 
nourish and care for it. Every human soul ought to 
be properly nourished from the very hour of concep- 
tion. We protect our young plants from the crowd- 
ing of weeds, from the devastation of insects and ani- 
m-als, and our house plants and others of value from 
the sun's scorching rays and the beating hail or 
driving rain. Do we protect God's precious unborn 
souls? If not, we may be held accountable by and 
by. Many a murderer, many a thief, many a forni- 
cator, many an idolater, many a profane man, has 
been made so by surrounding influences before birth. 
T\^Q father \\2i.'s> much to do with those influences, but 
we are asked to write only of the mother s influence. 
Mothers, you can give your sons a pure God-serving 
mother to love and look up to for instruction, com- 
fort and happiness. Love them, not only after they 
grow large enough to be attractive, but love them as 
soon as God gives their souls a breath of lite, which 
is even prior to birth. A hated child could hardly 
be expected to amount to anything. Yet many a poor 
soul is cursed by his own parents before he ever sees 
the light. 

Having loved and cared for them thus long, keep 
on doing so. Dress them comfortably, and feed them 
pure, healthful food, so they may feel reasonably 
happy. If you love them, of course you will cease- 
lessly pray for them and set an example of purity 
and uprightness before them. Children learn to 



talk as their parents do. If you wish to give to God 
a faithful servant who may win many souls to Christ 
by his words and vorce, train that voice to speak in 
a gentle, pleasing and firm, clear tone, to speak only 
such words as are true. Set the example. A 
child learns to imitate its copy. If you tell Johnny 
that there's a bear or wildcat in a certain place, be- 
cause you don't wa,nt him to go there, and he sees 
, you open the door, revealing no bear or wildcat, he 
will think you are a liar, and if it's smart for dear 
mamma to lie, of course it is for Johnny. But if you 
always tell the plain truth, and never deceive (not 
even in regard to Santa Claus) your boy will know 
that what mother says is true, and will respect her 
religious instruction accordingly. 

Having thus gained your son's confidence, you may 
impart to him such instruction as will make your fu- 
ture daughter-in-law love you, your grandchildren 
praise you, and the angels of heaven rejoice with the 
saints on earth because of the honesty integrity, and 
true godliness of a faithful and useful man. A true 
man is an image of God. Are we reflecting before 
our son's eyes such knowledge as will make him like 
God? Mothers have been known to make them like 
the other power. We should show our love to our 
boys in our actions. Not by scolding. There are 
many ways in which we may manifest love, and they 
are not indulgence either. Though pure pleasures 
should be indulged, a Christian mother should so 
win her boy's confidence that she will be his truest 
and most trusty confidant, his best and most pleasing- 
companion, his faithful, earnest and G^od-fearing ad- 
viser. Go a-fishing with him sometimes: enter into 
his sports, show sympathy with his tastes, and inter- 
est in his ambitions. Sow into his young heart seeds 
of purity, integrity, 7?tercy and kindiiess at every op- 
portunity. Sow them along with your daily conver- 
sation in a palatable manner, like a little sugar 
sprinkled over his bread and butter. Don't wait till 
his wedding day to teach him the things that you 
want your daughter's mother-in-law to teach her boy. 
The child is more teachable than the man. The 
grown tree can not be straightened. The farmer's 
boys are taught properly to care for plants and 
animals. The city boy may also be so instructed in a 
limited degree. And along with that instruction we 
may lovingly teach them that huniaii souls are far 
more important than plants or animals. Plant the 
Golden Rule in their hearts. 



The man who willfully goes back on his word has 
turned his back on heaven. 



Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer was fircL prepared in the year 
1780 by the grandfather of the present proprietor. Is it not like- 
ly that a remedy which has stood such a test of time possesses 
Tierit? 



We are specialists in diseases of the rectum and diseases of 
women. Read our references on second pag« of cover. Drs. 
Thornton & Minor. 



/ ^^SJI 



lOth Month.] 






OCTOBER. 




[Dayj 


3 31. 


Days & Weeks 


0) 


Remarkable 


$3: 


MOON 
Souths. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 


Moon'5 
Signs. 


Aspects of Planets, and 


Snn 
Fast 


sxjnsr 

Rises & Sets. 




Jt,^ 


Days. . 


H 


H. M. 


H. M. 


S. D. 


Other Miscellanu 


M. 


H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Mond'y 


19 


Remigius 


6 


5 4 7, morn. 


^23 


'^$ rises 2 59 ^ 


10 


6 11 


5 4^ 


2 Tues. 


20 


C. Cmumhus 


7 


6 41 


12 10 


0t ^ 


v.^l' t|J stationary 


11 


6 13 


5 47 


3 Wed. 


21 


Jairus 


8 


7 34 


12 50 


^21 


Sirius rises 12 64 


11 


6 14 


5 4G 


4 Thurs. 


22 


Franciscus 


9 


8 28 


1 49 


» 5 


Rigel rises 9 58 


11 


6 15 


5 45 


5 Friday 

6 Sat. 


23 


Placidus 


10 


9 21 


2 50 


3^18 


% souths 3 28 


12 


6 17 


5 44 


24 


Fides 


11 


10 15 


3 40 


^ 1 


Altair so. 6 57 S 


12 


6 18 


5 42 



40] 17th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 8. 



Day's length 11 hours 24 min. 



7 Sunday 


25 


8 Mond'y 


26 


9 Tues. 


27 


10 Wed. 


28 


11 Thurs. 


29 


12 Friday 


30 


13 Sat. 






Amelia 

Pelagius 

Dionysius 

Gereon 

Burkhard 

Veritas 

Coloman 



12 


11 10 


4 52 


ff*14 


12 


morn. 


([rises 


fM!^27 


1 


12 6 


6 1 


^10 


2 


1 5 


7 3 


^21 


3 


2 4 


8 14 


^ 4 


4 


3 3 


9 15 


^16 


5 


4 1 


10 16 


^27 



rises 7 21 
3) in Perigee 
Markab so. 9 59 
$ in a. ? in Aph. 
T? so. 4 39. ]) in S 
Andromeda so. 10 51 



12 


6 19 


12 


6 20 


1.3 


6 22 


13 


6 23 


13 


6 24 


14 


6 26 


14 


6 27 



41 
40 
38 
37 
36 
34 
35 



41] 18th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 20. Day's length 11 hours 06 min. 



14 Sunday 

15 Mond'y 

16 Tues. 

17 Wed. 

18 Thurs. 

19 Friday 

20 Sat. 



Fortunata 

Hedwick 

Gallus 

Florentina 

St. Ijuke^ ev, 

Ptolemy 

Felicianus 



6 


4 56 


11 17 


«io 


7 


5 49 


morn. 


HE22 


7 


6 37 


12 10 


m 4 


8 


7 23 


12 51 


*tl6 


9 


8 7 


1 24 


^28 


10 


8 49 


2 31 


^11 


10 


9 30 


3 30 


^25 



Sirius r. 
rises 6 46 



12 6 



Rigerrises 10 6 
Fomalhaut so. 9 18 

d If ijc. d $ C S 
Antares sets 7 6 



14 


6 28 


14 


6 29 


14 


6 30 


15 


6 32 


15 


6 33 


15 


6 35 


15 


6 36 



32 
31 
30 
29 

27 
25 
24 



42] 19th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 9. 



Day's length 10 hours 48 min. 

2l 



21 Sunday 

22 Mond'y 


5 
10 


23 Tues. 


11 


24 Wed. 


12 


25 Thurs. 


13 


26 Friday 

27 Sat. 


14 
15 



Ursula 

Cordula 

Severinus 

Salome 

Crispin 

Amandus 

Sabina 



11 


10 11 


4 34 


)^% y 


12 


10 54 


5 40 


)^^ Jo 


12 


11 37 


3) sets. 


* 7 


1 


12 23 


t 46 


«22 


2 


1 10 


6 40 


m 7 


3 


2 


7 42 


^22 


3 


2 51 


8 40!^ 6 



]) in Apogee 

% souths 2 34 
$r.3 7. 0en.c|g 

Regulus rises 9 14 

d ^ d. 3) in a 

d V ([. d If C 
Androm. so. 9 50 v^ 



15 


6 37 


15 


6 39 


15 


6 40 


16 


6 41 


16 


6 42 


16 


6 44 


16 


6 45 



21 
20 
19 
18 
16 
15 



43] 20th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 22. 



Day's length 10 hours 30 min. 



28 Sunday 

29 Mond'y 

30 Tues. 

31 Wed. 



16 
17 
18 
19 



Simon Jude 
Zwinglius 
Serapion 
Hallow Eve 



4 


3 43 


9 35 


^20 


5 


4 35 


10 30 


^ 4 


6 


5 27 


11 30 


^1^ 


7 


6 19 


morn. 


ss; 2 



5 Gr. Elong. E. 
? G. H. L. S. 

}? so. 3 27. 



16 


6 46 


16 


6 47 


16 


6 48 


16 


6 50 



5 14 
5 13 
5 12 
5 10 



EASTERN STATES. 



iviooiM's f»mase:s. 



First Quarter, 1st, 4 o'clock 12 min. Morn. 

Full Moon, 8th, 8 " 20 " Morn. 

Last Quarter, 15th, 4 " 53 *' Morn. 

New Moon, 23d, 8 " 29 " Morn. 

First Quarter, 31st, 3 " 19 " Morn. 



central states, western states. 



3 o'clock 32 min. Morn. 
7 " 40 " Morn. 

4 " 13 " Morn. 
7 " 49 " Morn. 
2 " 39 *' Morn. 



2 o'clock 52 min. Morn 
7 " 00 '* Morn 

3 " 33 " Morn 
7 " 09 " Morn 
1 " 59 " Mom 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



25 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



BY DOCTORS VANIMAN. 



Cancer of the Breast. 

Whenever a woman over forty years old finds a 
imor forming in the breast which is hard, somewhat 
ainful, and which gradually causes the nipple to re- 
act or become drawn in, she should suspicion can- 
;r and have it looked after soon. Often the cancer 
)uld be cured and life saved if attended to early, 
hich proves fatal when not promptly treated. 

Moles. 

A very simple procedure is said to remove moles 
ithout having recourse to the knife: Shave a match 
• sliver to as fine a point as possible, dip in carbolic 
nd and lightly touch the mole, ^are being taken to 
revent the acid touching any other portion of the 
;in. Apply this every three or four days and the 
ole will gradually disappear, leaving its space clean 
id healthy. 

A Simple Disinfectant. 

For the sick room a pleasant disinfectant is made 
^ putting in a saucer some freshly-ground coffee and 
^hting a piece of camphor gum on top of it. As this 
im burns it emits the odor of roasting coffee, an 
oma that is agreeable to most people. This per- 
me has the advantage of being healthful, and is to 
: preferred to the pastiles and incense powders, 
lich to some are very sickening. The odor of the 
ffee will counteract any bad aroma in the room and 
e fumes of the camphor will kill ordinary disease 
;rms that may be floating around. 

Wearing Glasses. 

Why do so many more young persons wear glasses 
w than some years ago? — is a question often asked, 
lere are at least two reasons for this. First, they 
I to school more and use their eyes more steadily in 
idy than years ago. Secondly, good glasses, prop- 
ly fitted, can be more easily obtained and persons 
e learning that they will correct the trouble with 
e eyes._ When a young person complains of head- 
he when reading or studying, pain in back of 
e eyeballs, the reading blurring after reading a few 
nutes, great trouble to read by lamplight, an oculist 
ould be consulted, regardless of the age of the per- 
n. Can glasses be properly fitted without seeing 
e patient? Emphatically no, except in cases of 
ierly persons who could do as well or better, to go 
some drug store and select from a stock of glasses 
ose that suit them. But best of all is to have the 
es properly tested and fitted, as frequently one's eyes 
e not alike and require different glasses. Glasses 
properly fitted are often more injurious than none. 



Hints About the Teeth. 

Have your teeth examined once or twice a year by 
a competent dentist. He makes no charges for this 
and may, by this examination, save you much ex- 
pense and annoyance. 

Never have a tooth pulled that can be saved by 
filling. 

Brush the teeth regularly every day, using some 
salt or baking soda if you have no prepared tooth 
powder. Rub them thoroughly not only with a side 
motion, but also up and down. 

Tartar on the teeth is very injurious, as it forces the 
gum away from the tooth and loosens it. 

Decayed teeth should be removed, as they are in- 
jurious to the health and make the breath offensive. 

Hot Water. 

Hot water has far more medical virtues than many 
believe or know. Because it is so easily procured thou- 
sands think it valueless. The uses of hot water are, 
however, many. For example, there is nothing that 
so promptly cuts short congestion of the lungs, sore 
throat, or rheumatism, as hot water when applied 
promptly and thoroughly. Headache most always 
yields to the simultaneous application of hot water to 
the feet and back of the neck. 

A towel folded several times and dipped in hot 
water, and quickly wrung out and applied over the 
painful part in toothache or neuralgia, will generally 
afford prompt relief. A strip of flannel or napkin 
folded lengthwise and dipped in hot water and wrung 
out and applied around the neck of a child that has 
the croup will sometimes bring relief in ten minutes. 
Hot water taken freely half an hour before bed time 
is helpful in case of constipation, while it has a most 
soothing effect upon the stomach and bowels. A gob- 
let of hot water taken just after rising, before break- 
fast, has cured thousands of indigestion, and no sim- 
ple remedy is more widely recommended by physi- 
cians to dyspeptics. Very hot water will stop dan- 
gerous bleeding. — National Farmer. 

A Good Eyew^ater. 

A good preparation for inflamed eyes is made as 
follows: 

Sulphate of Zinc, 2 gratas 

Sulphate of Morphia, 2 " 

Boracic Acid, 5 " 

Rose Water, i oz. 

Apply by dropping a few drops in the eyes once or 
twice a day. 



Thousands of dollars could be saved annually by invalids of 
the community, if, instead of calling in a doctor for every ordi- 
nary ailment, they were wise enough to put their trust in Dr. 
Peter's Blood Vitalizer. 



nth Month.] 



NOVEMBER. 



[Days 30. 



Days & Weeks 



HO 



Remarkable 
Days. 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M, 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 



sxjisr 
Rises & Sets 
H. M. i H. M 



1 Thurs. 

2 Friday 

3 Sat. 



20 
21 
22 



All Saints \ 8 
All Souls 9 
Theophilus |lO 



7 20 

8 39 

9 48 



1 40 

2 50 

3 49 



^15 

S;28 



$ rises 3 11 ^ 

Regulus r. 12 24 Q 
Sirius rises 10 59 



16 
16 
16 



6 51 
6 52 
6 53 



5 9 

5 8 
5 7 



44] 21ST Sunday after Trinity, John 6. 



Day's length 10 hours 14 min. 



Mondy 



4 Sunday 
5 

6 Tues, 

7 Wed. 

8 Thurs. 

9 Friday 
10 Sat. 



23 
24 
25 
26 

27 
28 
29 



Charlotte 

Malachi 

Leonard 

Engelbert 

Cecilia 

Theodore 

Mar. Jjulher 



11 


10 45 


12 


11 44 


1 


morn. 


2 


12 44 


2 


1 44 


s 


2 43 


4 


3 38 



4 411^24 

5 29;^ 6 
]) rises'^ 18 

5 10|^28 

6 1^8^12 

8 0^24 

9 3'^ 6 






rises 7 34 
^]) in Perigee 
T^ souths 3 5 
If so. 1 45 ]) in S 
Orion rises 8 43 
d ^ C- ? stationary 
Fomal. so. 7 30 n 



16 


6 54 


16 


6 55 


16 


6 56 


16 


6 57 


16 


6 58 


16 


6 59 


16 


7 



45] 22d Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 18. 



Day's length 10 hours 00 min. 



11 Sunday 


30 


12 Mond'y 


31 


13 Tues. 


N 


14 Wed. 


2 


15 Thurs. 


3 


16 Fridav 


4 


17 Sat. 


5 



Melanchton 

Jonas 

Winebert 

Levin 

Leopold 

Ottomar 

Alpheus 



5 


4 28 


10 4 


^«18 


6 


4 59 


11 5 


«30 


7 


5 48 


morn. 


^12 


7 


6 33 


12 3 


^24 


8 


'7 20 


12 54 


M 6 


9 


7 55 


1 27 


^19 


9 


8 10 


2 26 


^^25 ^ 



7-^ souths 12 37 
Vega sets 12 6 
$ rises 3 17 
6 $ (L- ? in PeriheL 
Altair sets 10 49 © 
Andromeda so. 8 34 
]) in Apogee. 



15 


7 1 


15 


7 3 


15 


7 4 


15 


7 5 


15 


7 6 


15 


7 7 


15 


7 8 



59 
57 
56 
55 
54 
53 
52 



46] 23d Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 22. 



Day's length 9 hours 44 min. 



18 Sunday 

19 Mond'y 


6 

7 


20 Tues. 


8 


21 Wed. 


9 


22 Thurs. 


10 


23 Friday 

24 Sat. 


11 
12 



Gelasius 

Elizabeth 

Amos 

Off, V.Mdy 

Alphonsus 

Clement 

Chrisogenes 



10 

11 

11 

12 

1 

1 

2 



8 
9 
10 
11 
11 
12 
1 



51 
34 
19 
6 
55 
47 
39 



3 21 

4 18 

5 14 
5 59 

]) sets. 

5 54 

6 55 



^5% 17 

c|g30 
$15 

^15 



d 2 C- $ in S 
Fomalliaut so. 6 9 
d § O inferior 
d § C- 3) in S 
WQ) &v'l?: en.i^ 
dl^C-dlJlC-^iiiPeriL 
d'bC- $ rises 3 20 w 



15 


7 9 


14 


7 10 


14 


7 11 


14 


7 11 


14 


7 12 


13 


7 13 


13 


7 14 



51 

50 
491 
4€ 
4e 

47 



4 46 



47] 24th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 21. 



Day's length 9 hours 32 min. 



25 Sunday 

26 Mond'y 

27 Tues. 

28 Wed. 

29 Thurs. 

30 Friday 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



Catharine 

Conrad 

Josaphat 

Guntherus 

TKnksgiv^g 

St. Andrew 



3 


2 32 


8 10 


^30 


4 


3 24 


9 20 


^14 


5 


4 15 


10 30 


^28 


6 


5 6 


11 38 


SS12 


7 


5 56 


morn. 


3£25 


7 


6 46 


12 40 


ff* 8 



T? souths 1 59 
Sirius rises 9 30 
Orion rises 7 12 
Arietas souths 9 42 
^ stationary 
% so. 12 36 Q 



13 


7 15 


12 


7 15 


12 


7 16 


12 


7 17 


11 


7 17 


11 


7 18 



41 

4:1 

44 
4^ 
4. 



IVIOOIM'S F^MASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 
Pull Moon, 6th, 6 o'cl 
Last Quarter, 13th, 9 * 
New Moon, 22d, 2 * 
First Quarter, 29th, 12 * 



:s. 




CENTRAL STATES. 


02 min. 


Even. 


5 o'clock 22 min. Even. 


39 ** 


Even. 


8 " 59 " Even., 


19 " 


Morn. 


1 " 39 " Morn. 


37 " 


Even. 


11 " 57 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 

4 o'clock 42 min. Eve 

8 ♦' 19 " Eve 

12 *• 59 '* Mor 

11 " 17 *' Mor 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



If 



Scarlatina. 

rhis is the technical name for scarlet fever. Often 
len a doctor pronounces a case scarlatina, persons 
I inclined to consider it only a mild case of scarlet 
rer, and will not use the same precautions they 
uld if they understood that scarlatina and scarlet 
^er are one and the same disease, and one which 
[uires the best of care, as what seems a slight at- 
;k may end seriously. 

Cholera Infantum 

rhis is one of the dreaded diseases of childhood. 
s the same disease as cholera morbus in adults. It 
:aused by some indigestible food, and is almost al- 
ys confined to hot weather. There is usually vom- 
ig and diarrhoea, with severe pains in the bowels, 
my a child's life would be saved if the parents 
uld use a syringe and hot water, filling the bowels 
h the water as hot as can be borne. Repeat this 
:h time the bowels move or a cramp comes on. 
is disease often does its work before a physician 
1 be secured, but if the foregoing instructions are 
[owed until a physician can be secured the chances 
saving life will be greatly increased. 

The Foot Bath in Bed. 

t is often desirable to give a sick person a foot 
h. Many persons do not know how easily this can 
done in bed under the cover. Simply place the 
t tub under the cover; let the patient lie on the 
:k. Bend the legs at the knees and place the feet 
:he tub. It is comfortably done and plenty of time 
I be taken. 

Bedroom Pointers. 

sunlight is good for everything but feathers. 
Way with hangings, either above or below the bed. 
beware of a dusty, musty carpet; better sweetness 
1 a bare floor. , 

Ceep the head cool while sleeping, but not by a 
ift of cold air falling upon it. 

f a folding bed must be used contrive some way 
ceep it aired and wholesome. 

.et the pillow be high enough to bring the head in 
atural position; no more nor less, 
thoroughly air the sleeping-room every day; place 
beds and bedding outside as often as possible! 
I dark, out-of-the-way, unwholesome corner is no 
re fitted for a sleeping-room than for a parlor. 
^ feather bed which has done service for a gener- 
m or two is hardly a desirable thing upon which 
sleep. 

Using Tobacco. 

*rof. Rufus Clark of the normal school of Win- 
:ster, Tenn., said: "I can go through this school 
I put my hand on every boy that uses tobacco, for 
shows it in his face; and, if I am in doubt, I can 
|ve my surmise by looking at his recitation cards." 



ARE YOU LOOKING FOR 

A COURSE of highly interesting and deeply inspir 
ing literature to read during the long winter even- 
ings? 

A BOOK 

is valuable only according to the influence it has up- 
on the mind of the reader. "Of the making of 
books there is no end," said the Wise Man, and in 
these days of progress it is literally true. We can 
not even read all the good books. One of the mar- 
vels of the age is the great missionary movement 
which confronts the Christian church to-day. The 
church that is not intensely missionary ceases to be 
evangelical. Where do you stand on this great ques- 
tion? Do you want to know more about it? To help 
you to acquire a greater knowledge of missions and 
inspire you to a greater degree of activity along this 
line, 

OUR MISSIONARY READING CIRCLE 

was organized several years ago. It has done a 
noble work: we want it to continue. A course of 
reading has been outlined covering the whole field of 
missionary effort. Care has been taken in the selec- 
tion of books, only those best adapted to our people 
being selected. We 

WILL HELP YOU 

to take up this course of reading by furnishing the 
books at low prices to those who join the Circle, 
The management is under the care of the General 
Missionary and Tract Committee. The Pilot \s the 
organ of the, Circle, where a properly conducted de- 
partment is devoted to its interests. A " Younj? 
People's" and an " Advanced" course will be added 
shortly. Write to-day to the Secretary for a prom- 
ise card and full information jconcerning books and. 
prices. Lizzie D. Rosenberger, 

Secretary „ 
Covington, Ohio. 

ORGANIZATION OF COMMITTEE. 

W. B. Stover, Bulsar, India President 

John R. Snyder, Bellefontaine, Ohio, Acting President 

Otho Winger, Sweetsers, Ind., Vice President 

Lizzie D. Rosenberger, Covington, Ohio, Secretary and Treasurer 



THE ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Annual Conference for 1900 will be held at 
North Manchester, Ind., commencing at 8 o'clock 
Tuesday morning, June 5. The Standing Committee 
will meet and organize at 8 A. M., Thursday, May 31. 



Broken down invalids, do you wish to gather flesh, acquire 
an appetite, enjoy refreshing sleep and feel that every fibre and 
tissue of your body is being braced and renovated? Commence 
treatment with Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer. 



12th Month.] 



DB>G6>MBE>R. 



[Days 31, 



Days & Weeks 



HO 



CO 



Remarkable 
Days. 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 

SigBS. 

S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellany. 



Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 1 H. M. 



1 Sat. |19|Longmus | 8| 7 STj 1 42|p|l;21|Sirms rises 9 6 »^|10|7 19|4 41 



48] 1st Sunday in Advent. 



Matt. 21. 



Day's length 9 hours 22 min. 



2 Sunday 

3 Mond'y 

4 Tues. 

5 Wed. 

6 Thurs. 

7 Friday 

8 Sat. 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



Candidus 
Cassianns 

L. J. Heatwole 
born 1852. 

Abigail 
St. Nicholas 
Agathon 



26 Cone, V. M. 



9 


8 31 


10 


9 27 


11 


10 25 


12 


11 25 


1 


morn. 


2 


12 25 


2 


1 22 



2 40^ 3 

3 59 J* 15 

5 10fl*27 

6 14^ 9 

[rises 55^21 
5. 41 Hi 3 
6 47!^B14 



S souths 5 43 

5G.H.L.N. 3)inPeri. 

? Gr. Hel. Lat. N. 
d )il ©. 2) in S 
7* souths 10 50 

dt^d.^Gr.Elg.W. o 

Orion rises 6 17 



10 


7 19 


10 


7 20 


9 


7 20 


9 


7 21 


9 


7 21 


8 


7 22 


8 


7 22 



41 

40 
40 
39 
39 

38 
38 



49] 2d Sunday in Advent. 



Luke 21. 



Day's length 9 hours 16 min. 



9 Sunday 

10 Mond'y 

11 Tues. 

12 Wed. 

13 Thurs. 

14 Friday 

15 Sat. 



27 
28 
29 
30 
D 
2 
3 



Joachim 

Judith 

Barsabas 

Ottilia 

Ludan 

Nicasius 

Ignatius 



3 


2 17 


7 20 


«26 


4 


3 8 


8 10 


«r 8 


6 


3 56 


10 14 


(1*20 


5 


4 40 


11 24 


^ 2 


6 


5 23 


morn. 


M^^ 


7 


6 5 


12 43 


J^28 


8 


6 47 


1 21 


^5°^ 11 



Regulus rises 10 10 
Altair sets 8 55 
Fomalhaut sets 9 45 

6 s (L 

Marli.s.12 25 S 
6%Q' Spica r. 2 26 
([ in Apogee 



7 


7 23 


7 


7 23 


6 


7 23 


6 


7 24 


5 


7 24 


5 


7 24 


4 


7 24 



37 
37 
37 
36 
36 
36 
36 



50] 3d Sunday in Advent. 



Matt. 11. 



Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



16 Sunday 


4 


17 Mond'y 


5 


18 Tues. 


6 


19 Wed. 


7 


20 Thurs. 


8 


21 Friday 


9 


22 Sat. 


10 



Ananias 

Lazarus 

Arnoldus 

Emberday 

Ammon 

St, Thomas 

Beata 



8 


7 29 


9 


8 13 


10 


8 59 


10 


9 48 


11 


10 39 


12 


11 32 


1 


12 25 



4^24|Orion rises 5 48 

Rigel souths 11 27 
$ souths 4 58 

d ? C- d lit C- 



<« 8 
dig 23 

50||^ 8 
40ji|$23 
3) sets 1^ 9 
5 36:^24 



0„ ,^fc Shortest 
^- rf»!- Day. 



Winter 
Begins 



4 


7 25 


3 


7 25 


3 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


1 


7 25 





7 26 



35 
35 
35 
35 
35 
35 
34 



51] 4th Sunday in Advent. 



John 1. 



Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



23 Sunday 


11 


24 Mond'y 


12 


25 Tues. 


13 


26 Wed. 


14 


27 Thurs. 


15 


28 Friday 


16 


29 Sat. 


17 



Dagobert 
Adam, Eve 
Christmas 
Stephen 
John Evan. 
H. Innoc'nts 
Noah 



2 


1 19 


6 41 


^ 9 


3 


2 12 


7 56 


^23 


4 


3 3 


9 10 


3S 8 


5 


3 53 


10 18 


3S;21 


5 


4 43 


11 24 


irf 4 


6 


5 34 


morn. 


fP*17 


7 


6 25 


12 30 


^30 



Regulus rises 9 8 

7* souths 9 29 

Aldebaran so. 10 5 

?inS 

Arietas so. 7 36 Q 
Sirius r. 8 4 
dT^Q.Alts. 7 35 



o 


7 25 


sloff 


7 25 





7 25 


1 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


3 


7 24 



35 
35 
3f 
3£ 
3f 
3f 



52] Sunday after Christmas. Luke 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



30 Sunday 

31 Mond'y 



Oopernicus 
Sylvester 



7 18 

8 14 



30 
40 



^12 
^24 



d ? 1/. 3) in Perigee 
S souths 4 14 



24 
24 



4 3( 
4 3( 



IVIOOIM'S f>mase:8. 

EASTERN STATES. CENTRAL STATES. 

Full Moon, 6th, 5 o'clock 40 min. Morn. 5 o'clock 00 min. Morn. 

Last Quarter, 13th, 5 " 44 " Even. 6 " 04 " Even. 4 '' 24 

New luoon, 21st, 7 " 03 " Even. 6 " 23 " Even. 5 " 43 

First Quarter, 28th, 8 " 50 " Even. 8 " 10 " Even. 7 " 30 

Jupiter is in conjunction with the Sun on the 14th and cannot be seen. 

Saturn is in conjunction with the Sun on the 29th and cannot be seen. 



WESTERN STATES. 

4 o'clock 20 min. Mori 
Evei 
Evei 
Evei 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



29 



VERSES FOR TABLE SERVICE. 



rhose knowing of other appropriate verses for table 
rvice, will please send copy of the same. — Ed. 

S. M. 

God is the fountain whence 

Ten thousand blessings flow; 
To him my life, my health and friends, 

And ev'ry good, I owe. 

* * * 
The comforts God affords 

Are neither few nor small, 
He is the source of fresh delights, 
My portion and my all. 

* * * 

O, BLESS the Lord, my soul; 

Let all within me join, 
And aid my tongue to bless his name, 

Whose favors are divine. 

* * * 

O, bless the Lord, my soul; 

Nor let his mercies lie 
Forgotten in unthankfulness, 

And without praises die. 

C. M. 

O, Lord, we cannot silent be, 

By love we are constrained 
To offer our best thanks to Thee, 

Our Savior and our Friend. 

* * * 

Great God, to thine almighty love 

What honors shall we raise? 
Not all the raptured songs above 

Can render equal praise. 
/ * * * 

To thee, O God, in thankful song, 

We lift the heart and voice; 
O may thy mercies tune each tongue 

And bid our souls rejoice. 

T.. M. 

.Bless, O my soul, the God of grace, 
His favors claim thy highest praise; 
Why should ungrateful silence hide 
The blessings which his hands provide? 

* * * 

Father, thy mercy hath supplied 

Our wants from thy unbounded store; 

O, may our souls, thro' Christ who died, 
Be fed and never hunger more. 

* * * 

We thank thee, Lord, for daily bread. 
Which from thy bounteous hand is given; 

O may oar souls through grace be fed 
On Christ, the Bread of Life from Heaven. 



We bless thee. Lord, for this our food. 
But more for Jesus' flesh and blood; 
The manna to our spirits given, 
The loving bread sent down from Heaven. 

* * * 

God from his cloudy cisterns pours 
On the parch'd earth enriching show'rs; 
The grove, the garden and the field, 
A thousand joyful blessings yield. 

* * * 

If peace and plenty crown my days, 
Then help me. Lord, to sing thy praise; 
If bread of sorrow be my food. 
Those sorrows work my real good. 

Be present at our table, Lord! 
Be here and ev'rywhere ador'd! 
Thy people bless, and grant that we 
May feast in paradise with thee. 

* * * 

O render thanks to God above, 
The Fountain of eternal love. 
Whose mercy firm through ages past 
Has stood and shall forever last. 

* # * 
Blessings to God, forever blest — 
To God, the Master of the feast — 
Who hath for us a table spread. 
And from his hands us creatures fed, 

* * * 

O, give us all a thankful heart; 
Help us from evil to depart; 
Our daily meat Lord, let it be, 
Thy will to do, and follow thee. 



A LITTLE SUNSHINE. 



How He Used the Candles. 

This will be appreciated by those who have trav- 
eled in Europe, where it is customary for the guests 
to pay for the candles in their rooms, whether they 
use them or not. 

A New Yorker was shown to a room in a hotel in 
Brussels, where he found twenty candles stuck in a 
chandelier in the center. As it was dark, the attend- 
ant lighted them all; but the guest had been in Euro- 
pean hotels before, and made him put them out im- 
mediately. 

This was of no avail, however. In his bill next 
day he found them charged, "twenty candles, 10 
francs" ($2.00). 

He went back to the room and took them all out, 
wrapped them in a bit of paper and slipped them 
into his overcoat pocket. 

Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer cleanses the blood of its impuri- 
ties and at the same time strengthens the entire system. It 
makes healthy, happy children and grown folks. Sold to the 
people direct or through local agents. 



30 



Brethren s Family Almaiiac. 



When he was about to leave the house he found 
the servants drawn up in two lines in the hall in the 
European style — ten men-servants on one side, ten 
maid-servants on the other — all smiling and ready 
for the expected tip. Then he drew out his package 
and distributed the candles, one to each. 

"Allow me, monsieur," said he, with a bow; "per- 
mit me, madame. They are very superior candles, 
I assure you; I paid ten cents apiece for them;" and 
he left them all staring at the candles like so many 
altar boys. 

Why She Did Not Cry. 

An emotional preacher observed one Sunday that 
the whole of his congregation, with the exception of 
one little girl, who sat quite alone, was in tears. 

He thereupon directed all his power toward the 
child, drawing such touching pictures that the rest of 
the congregation grew more and more overcome, sob- 
bing and crying; but the child still stared at him dry- 
eyed and at length he was obliged to give it up and 
end the sermon. 

Meeting the child outside, he upbraided her for 
her hardheartedness and asked her why she did not 
weep. 

" It is not that I am hard-hearted," the child re- 
sponded," but I belong to another church." 

He Sat Down. 

A Sunday school teacher tells of a comical expe- 
rience. He was invited to make an address at a Sun- 
day-school festival, and having nothing prepared to 
say, he tried to picture to the children the doleful- 
ness of his position, and asked them this question: 
" What would you do if you were compelled to stand 
on a platform before so many bright boys and girls 
who expected a speech from you and you had noth- 
ing to say?" "I'd keep quiet," said one small boy; 
and his answer immediately brought down the house, 
and quickly brought down the speaker, too. 

The Young Preacher's Test. 

It is said that Spurgeon was in the habit of testing 
the ability and self-possession of the theological stu- 
dents under his care by sending them up into the pul- 
pit with a sealed envelope in their hands containing 
the text of the sermon or address each one was to de- 
liver on the spur of the moment. On one of these oc- 
casions the student, on opening his paper, found this 
subject and direction given him: "Apply the story of 
Zaccheus to your own circumstances and your call to 
the ministry." The student promptly delivered him- 
self in the following way: "My brethren, the subject 
on which I have to address you to-day is a compari- 
son between Zaccheus and my qualifications. Well, 



the first thing we read about Zaccheus is that be w 
small of stature; and I never felt so small as I ( 
now. In the second place, we read that he was ap 
a tree, which is very much my position now.. Ai 
thirdly, we read that Zaccheus made haste to con 
down, and in this I gladly and promptly follow h 
example." 

An Apt Reply. 

She was dressed smartly; and, when she met 
small, bare-legged urchin carrying a bird's nest wi 
eggs in it, she did not hesitate to stop him. 

"You are a wicked boy! " she said. "How cou 
you rob that nest? No doubt the poor mother 
grieving for the loss of her eggs." 

"Oh, she don't care," said the boy, edging awa 
"She's on your hat! " 



GISH PUBLISHING FUND. 



§ I. Name.—T\i^ name of this fund shall be tl 
Gish Publishing Fund. 

§ 2. Fund.—TMi?, fund shall consist of the estai 
of James R. and Barbara Giih, estimated value, $5c 
000.00 ; with any other funds that may hereafter t 
added to it. 

§ 3. Purpose, -~i:\i& purpose of this fund shall t 
to supply the ministers of the German Baptist Bretl 
ren Church with such books and other printed matt< 
as may be helpful to them in advancing and mail 
taining the Truth. 

§ 4. Supervision. — The General Missionary ar 
Tract Committee shall appoint a committee of thre 
so arranged in term of office that the time of or 
member expires each year, whose duty it shall be 

{a) To examine and pass upon pul)lications issue 
and distributed by this fund. 

{b) To arrange with the Publication Departme 
for publication and distribution of publications s 
lected. 

^ § 5. Surplus. — Any surplus on hand at the end 
the fiscal year of the General Missionary and Tra 
Committee shall, after proper allowapce has be^ 
made for selected books not yet published, be turn' 
over to the fund for superannuated and disabi 
ministers and missionaries: but should it not* 
needed in said fund, then it shall be given to t 
World-wide Mission Fund. 

§ 6. Terms. — The publications shall be distribu 
free or at greatly reduced rates, at no time the pri 
asked being more than the cost of publication 
eluding expense for delivery. 



Our references are our cures. Read what they say on second 
page of cover.— Drs. Thornton & y inor. 



Turn to "ad" on page and 45 read there the descriptioi; 
Watch No. 101, a high-grade 17-jeweled watch for only $10. 



Brethre?is Family Almanac. 



\ 7. Report.— The General Missionary and Tract 
mmittee shall cause to be published an annual 
)ort of the fund, including the list of books pub- 
led and the number of copies distributed each 



REMARKS. 



V number of books have already been arranged 
under this fund, and a list will be sent to any of 
r ministers upon application. 



DISTRICT MEETINGS FOR 1900. 



rHE following is as complete as we could make it 
:h the data at our command: 

kVestern Pennsylvania, Markleysburg church, 

lyg. 

Eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and West 

nestoga church, in the Middle Creek house, May 3. 

A^estern Maryland, Fairview church. May 5. 

Vliddle Maryland, Berkley church, at Vancleves- 

le, Va., April 19. 

^irst District of Virginia, Mount Joy church, April 

Northern Iowa, Southern Minnesota and South 
ikota, Winona church, Minn. (Date not given), 
southern Iowa, Mount Etna church, Adams Coun- 
Oct. 5. 

3klahoma and Indian Territories, Mount Valley 
urch, Okla. T., Oct. 5. 

Morthern Missouri, Pleasant Vrew church, Sept. 7. 
Vliddle Missouri, Mound church, Oct. 4. 
Southern Missouri, Shoal Creek church, Oct. 25. 
Nebraska, Bethel church, Oct. 3. 
Northern InHiana, Bethel church, Oct. 4. 
Southern Indiana, Greentown church, April 11. 
Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, Powell's Valley 
urch, Sept. 21. 

Southwestern Kansas, Southern Colorado and 
dahoma Territory, Monitor church, April 11. 
Northeastern Kansas, Vermillion church, Oct. 3. 
Northwestern Kansas and Northern Colorado, St. 
rain church, Colo., May 4. 

Southeastern Kansas, Verdigris church, April 11. 
Southern Ohio, Upper Stillwater, church. May i. 
Northeastern Ohio, East Nimishillen church. 
)ate not given), 

Texas and Southwestern Louisiana, Manvel, Tex., 
riday before the first full moon in August. 
Southern Illinois, Oakley church, Oct. 3. 
Northern Illinois and Wisconsin, Naperville, May 2. 



SUNDAY=SCHOOL SECRETARIES. 



Pennsylvania. 

Eastern 



Middle— W. S. Long, Tyrone, Pa. 
Southern— Wm. A. Anthony, Clay Hill, Pa. 
Western — S. S. Blough, Johnstown, Pa. 

Virginia. 

First District — Joseph H. Murray, Roanoke, Va. 
Second District — J. W. Wampler, Edom, Va. 

West Virginia. 

First District— Geo. S. Arnold, Burlington, W. Va 
Second District , 

Maryland. 

Eastern — W. P. Englar, Uniontown, Md. 
Middle — Caleb Long, Boonsboro, Md. 
Western . 

Tennessee, North Carolina and Florida. 

Texas and Louisiana. 

A. J. Wine, Nocona, Tex. 
Ohio. 

Northeastern — Geo. Culler, Weilersville, Ohio. 
Northwestern — David Byerly, Lima, Ohio. 
Southern — Levi Minnich, Painter Creek, Ohio. 

Indiana. 

Northern — Irvin S. Burns, Wakarusa, Ind. 
Middle — Frank Fisher, Mexico, Ind. 
Southern — H. H. Keim, Ladoga, Ind. 

Michigan. 

J. W. Chambers, Brice, Mich. 

Illinois. 

Northern — Grant Mahan, Elgin, III. 
Southern — John Hudson, Lovington, III. 

Dakota. 

North Dakota— Clara Aldstadt, Cando, N. Dak. 

Iowa. 

Northern Iowa, Southern Minnesota and South 
Dakota — Alda E. Albright, Eldora, Iowa. 

Middle . . 

Southern — Myrta Leavell, Unionville, lowso 

Missouri. 

Northern . 



Middle —D. L. Mohler, Leeton, Mo. 
Southern and Arkansas 



Nebraska. 

David G. Wine, Octavia, Nebr. 

Kansas. 

Northeastern — W. H. Leaman, Meriden, Kans. 

Northwestern . 

Southeastern — W. D. Tisdale, Ft. Scott, Kans. 
Southwestern — C. E. Arnold, McPherson, Kans. 

Oklahoma and Indian Territories. 

W. R. Brubaker, Acton, Okla. Ter. 
California and Arizona. 

Sarah Brondt, Covina, Cal. 



32 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



MISSION BOARDS AND THEIR ORGANIZATION. 



General Missionary and Tract Committee. 

Chairman and Treasurer, Eld. D. L. Miller, Mt. Mor- 
ris, 111. 
Vice-Chairman, Eld. Lewis W. Teeter, Hagerstown, 

Ind. 
Eld. S. F. Sanger, Manassas, Va. 
Eld. A. B. Barnhart, Hagerstown, Md. 
Eld. John Zuck, Clarence, Iowa. 

All correspondence for the Committee should be 
addressed to its office as follows: The General Mis- 
sionary and Tract Committee, Elgin, 111. 

The regular meetings of the Committee are the 
Monday before the convening of Standing Commit- 
tee at Annual Meeting, and the second Monday of 
February and October. 

District Mission Boards. 

California. 

Chairman, A. W. Wolf, Tropico, Cal. 
Treasurer, Thorn. Keiser, Lordsburg, Cal. 
Secretary, D. J. Overholtzer, Lemon, Cal. 

Illinois, Northern District. 

Chairman, D. R. Price, Oregon, 111. 

Secretary, C. H. Hawbecker, Franklin Grove, 111. 

Wm. M. Felker, Leaf River, 111. 

J. W. Buck, Franklin Grove, 111. 

J. H. Rohrer. Mt. Carroll, 111. 

Illinois, Southern District. 

Chairman, J. D. Gruber, Astoria, 111. 
Treasurer, G. W. Sensenbaugh, Oakley, 111. 
Secretary, S. S. Brubaker, Virden, 111. 
Jacob Wyne, LaPlace, 111. 
D. J. Blickenstaff, Oakley, 111. 

Indiana, Northern District. 

Chairman, Levi E. Weaver, Middlebury, Ind. 
Treasurer, D. J. Whitehead, New Paris, Ind. 
Secretary, R. W. Davenport, Goshen, Ind. 

Indiana, Middle District. 

Chairman, S. S. Ulery, North Manchester, Ind. 
Treasurer, Aaron Mishler, Collamer, Ind. 
Secretary, A. G. Crosswhite, Flora, Ind. 
Emanuel Grossnickle, North Manchester, Ind. 

Indiana, Southern District. 

Chairman, William Hicks, Lebanon, Ind., Rural 

Route, No. I. 
Treasurer, Lewis L. Hooke, Stockport, Ind. 
Secretary, Samuel Mohler, Cambria, Ind. 

Iowa, Northern District, including South Dakota. 

Chairman, Samuel Fike, Calvin, Iowa. 
Secretary, Jacob Lichty, Eagle Center, Iowa. 
Treasurer, J. H. Cable, Calvin, Iowa. 
Silas Gilbert, Ivester, Iowa. 
Jacob S. Albright, Eldora, Iowa. 

Iowa, Middle District. 

Chairman, H. R. Taylor, 1636 Grand Ave., Des 

Moines, Iowa. 
Treasurer, C. Z. Reitz, Maxwell, Iowa. 
Secretary, George Royer, Dallas Center, Iowa. 



Iowa, Southern District. 

Chairman, S. F. Brower, South Englich, Iowa. 
Treasurer, J. D. Brower, South English, Iowa. 
Secretary, J. D. Coffman, South English, Iowa. 

Kansas, Northeastern District. 

Chairman, I. L. Hoover, Alfred, Kans. 
Treasurer, George A. Fishburn, Overbrook, Kans. 
Secretary, J. W. Mosier, Meridian, Kans. 
Chas. Wampler, Olathe, Kans. 
Geo. W. Abell, Edgerton, Kans. 

Kansas, Northwestern District, including Norths 
Colorado. 

Chairman, John B. Wertz, Quinter, Kans. 
^ Treasurer, G. Roesch, Quinter, Kans. 

Secretary, G. W. Bishop, Rockwell City, Kans. 

Kansas, Southeastern District. 

Chairman, M. O. Hodgden, Galesburg, Kans. 
Treasurer, S. E. Cornelius, Parsons, Kans. 
Secretary, E. M. Horner, Fredonia, Kans. 

Kansas, Southwestern District. 

Chairman, W. A. Rose, Booth, Kans. 

Secretary, F. P. Detter, Nickerson, Kans. 

John Wales, Newton, Kans. 

J. P. Puterbaugh, Nickerson, Kans 

J. J. Yoder, Monitor, Kans. 

Maryland, Eastern District. 

Chairman, S. H. Utz, New Market, Md. 
Treasurer, Alfred Englar, New Windsor, Md. 
Secretary, Ezra M. Bish, Westminster, Md. 
Chas. F. Ausherman, Ellerton, Md. 
J. P. Weybright, Double Pipe Creek, Md. 

Maryland, Middle District. 

Chairman^ David Ausherman, Burkittsville, Md. 
Treasurer, John Roland, Reid, Md. 
Secretary, W. S. Reichard, Hagerstown, Md. 
Samuel Foltz, Hagerstown, Md. 
Jacob Bricker, Downsville, Md. 

Maryland, Western District. 

Chairman, I. W. Abernathy, Wilson, W. Va. 
Secretary and Treasurer, James W. Beeghly, A 

cident, Md. ' 
W. T. Sines, Oakland, Md. 
S. K. Fike, Grantsville, Md. 
T. B. Digman, Mt. Lake, Md. 

Michigan. 

Chairman, Joseph H. Smith, Woodland, Mich. 
Treasurer, David B. Mote, Lake Odessa, Mich. 
Secretary, Peter B. Messner, Lake Odessa, Mich 

Missouri, Northern District. 

Chairman, S. E. Hogan, Rockingham, Me. 
Treasurer, G. W. Ellenberger, Turney, Mo. 
Secretary, J. E. Shamberger, Sheridan, M«. 
M. E. Stair, Polo, Mo. 
Jacob Kuhn, Mound City, Mo. 

Missouri, Middle District. 

Chairman, John E. Mohler, Warrensburg, Mo, 
Treasurer, Samuel Bolinger. 
Secretary, D. M. Mohler, Leeton, Mo. 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



33 



^sonri. Southern District. 

Chairman, James P. Harris, Cabool, Mo. 
rreasurer, Samuel Wine, Jasper, Mo 
Jecretary, Samuel Gault, Aviila, Mo. 

braska. 

;;hairman, C. J. Lichty, Davenport, Nebr. 
rreasurer, H. Ruth, Octavia, Nebr. 
lecretary, S. M. Forney, Kearney, Nebr. 

rth Dakota. 

'hairman, J. C. Seibert, Cando, N. Dak. 
rreasurer, Wm. Kessler, Cando, N. Dak. 
lecretary, Isaac Wagner, Crary, N. Dak. 

io, Northeastern District. 

'hairman, F. B. Weimer, Sterling, Ohio, 
"reasurer, D. J. Yutzey, Canton, Ohio. 
Secretary, A. B. Horst, Chatham, Ohio. 
Charles Kingsley, Hartville, Ohio. 

Io, Northwestern District. 

'hairman, S. A. Walker, Bloomville, Ohio, 
treasurer, Solomon Rodabaugh, New Stark, Ohio, 
lecretary, Isaac Miller, West Cairo, Ohio. 
J. W. Sellers, Bryan, Ohio. 
Andrew Witmore, Longley, Ohio. 

Io, Southern District. 

Chairman, Jonas Horning, Johnsville, Ohio. 
Measurer and Secretary, Adam Peifer, West Mil- 
ton, Ohio. 

Ldam Minnich, Potsdam, Ohio. 
). M. Garver, Farmersville, Ohio. 
1. A. Erbaugh, New Lebanon, Ohio. 

lahotna. No Man's Land and Indian Territory. 

Chairman, Samuel Edge comb. Plumb, Okla. 
ecretary, J. H. Cox, Clarkson^ Okla. 
'reasurer, Chas. Brubaker, Tryan, Okla. 
. H. Neher, Guthrie, Okla. 
). L. Kinzie, Gushing, Okla. 

tinsylvania, Eastern District and New Jersey. 

Ihairman, H. E. Light, Mountville, Pa. 

'reasurer, John Herr, Myerstown, Pa. 

ecretary, I. W. Taylor, Vogansville, Pa. 

3hn Witmer, Hanoverdale, Pa. 

. Y. King, Griffin, Md. 

esse Zeigler, Royersford, Pa. 

insylvania, Middle District. 

:hairman, George S. Myers, New Enterprise, Pa. 
'reasurer, J. B: Miller, Woodbury, Pa. 
ecretary, J. B. Brumbaugh, Huntingdon, Pa. 

insylvania, Southern District. 

hairman, J. A. Long, York, Pa. 
"reasurer, C. L. Pfoutz, Knoxlyn, Pa. 
ecretary, Wm. A. Anthony, Clay Hill, Pa. 
icob Hollinger, Green Spring, Pa. 
[enry Beelman, Dillsburg, Pa. 

insylvania, Western District. 

:hairman, W. G. Schrock, Brotherton, Pa. 
'reasurer, P. J. Blough, Hooverville, Pa. 
ecretary, H. A. Stahl, Glade, Pa. 
IT. G. Lmt, Meyersdale, Pa. 
i^. H. Fry, Scalp Level. Pa. 



Tennessee, Florida and Alabama. 

Chairman, J. B. Bowman, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Treasurer, C. H. Diehl, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Secretary, J. B. Pence, Limestone, Tenn. 
M. Nead, Matuta, Tenn. 

Texas. 

Chairman, F. K. Bowman, Saginaw, Texas. 
Treasurer, A. J. Wine, Saginaw, Texas. 
Secretary, A. W. Vaniman, Saginaw, Texas. 

Virginia, First District. 

Z. Keith, Santos, Va. 

Treasurer, Nathan H. Garst, Salem, Va. 

Secretary, S. L. Shaver, Troutville, Va. 

T. C. Denton, Daleville, Va. 

Riley Peters, Helms, Va. 

B. F. Flory, Dugwell, Va. 

Fletcher Deaton, Salem, Va. 

Dr. R. T. Akers, Alumridge, Va. 

Virginia, Second District. 

Chairman, George Miller, Goods Mills, Va. 
Treasurer, J. M. Kagey, Dayton, Va. 
Secretary, D. H. Zigler, Mayland, Va. 
E. D. Kindig, Stuart's Draft, Va. 
A. A. Miller, Sangersville, Va. 

West Virginia, First District. 

Chairman, Peter Arnold, Burlington, W. Va. 
Treasurer and Secretary, J. H. Cassady, Green- 
land, W. Va. 
John Fike, Eglon, W. Va. 
John Miller, Eglon, W. Va. 
J. Berry, Augusta, W. Va. 

West Virginia, Second District. 

Chairman, G. W. Annon, Thornton, W. Va. 
Treasurer, J. F. Ross, Simpson, W. Va. 
Secretary, Z. Annon, Thornton, W. Va. 



Farm for Trade or Sale, 



We have two choice farms of i6o acres each, near 
the Eel River church, and close to the Manchester 
College, of the German Baptist church. These farms 
we will sell or exchange for smaller farms, elsewhere. 
Also we have a number of smaller farms for sale in 
Dunker communities. We do a general business in 
real estate and loans. Address: 

ISENBARGER & ARNOLD. 

North Manchester, Ina. 



YOUR EYESIGHT IS PRECIOUS.— Buy only the best [ 

glasses. I sell perfect lenses in good nickel-plated frames. T 

for $i.oo per pair postpaid. Alumi- r 

frames, $1.40. Solid Gold * 




frames $3.85 and upward. Price list r 

and instructions "How to Fit the X 

Eyes " sent free. All kinds of specta- X 

cles at the lowest prices. Address: T 
H. E. Newcomer. Mx. Morris, III. 



34 



Brethren s Family ALmajiac. 



Dyi:i:N"ISTEK.I^L LIST. 



Corrected up to and including Dec. 6, 1899. 



Asia Minor. 

Biniatoglon, Prodronius, Aidin 
Hanikian, Milkron, . Smyrna 
Kiriadjidis, Athanasius, . . 
Smyrna 

Kritikakis, Herakles 

Philadelphia 

Canada. 

Maldeis, H. B., 291 Fullum St., 
Montreal 

Denmark. 

Eskildsen, C. C, . . Hjorring 
Gespersen, Peter S., . Hordum 
Hansen, Christian, . Godthaab 
Johansen, Martin, . . Hordum 
Poulson, P. C, Frederickshavn 

Swendsen, Theodor 

. . . Brodrehjemmet,Sindal 

France. 

Goiffon, V Oyonna.x 

India. 

Forney, Daniel L., . . Navsari 
McCann, S. N., Bulsar, . . . 

. . . Presidency of Bombay 
Stover, W. B., Bulsar, . . . 

. . . Presidency of Bombay 

Sweden. 

Anderspn, Andreas, Limhamn 

Anderson, W Malmberg 

Gustafson, A., . . Wanneberga 
Jenson, Per, . . . Wanneberga 
Ohlsson, Hans. .... Malmo 

Olin, O. P., Skurup 

Risberg, Jans, . . - Kjeflinge 

Switzerland 

Fercken, G. J., Lancy, . . . 
Canton Geneva 

Alabama. 

Baker. N. R Citronelle 

Beery, P. H.. . . . Citronelle 
Ennis. Marshall M.. Fruitdale 
Holderman, Jacob, . Fruitdale 

Neff, James M Fruitdale 

Neher, E, J., . . . Hollywood 
Neher. L. M., . . . Citronelle 

Arizona. 

Forney, Peter, . . . Glendale 
Gillett, C. E Aultman 

Arlcansas. 

Berkman, D. G., . Texarkana 
Bosserman. J. H.. . Knoxville 
Bradley. F. H., . . Chismville 

Brickey, Allen Jenson 

Brubaker, Henry, . Knoxville 
Buckmaster, G. W., . Carlisle 
Burnett. P. R., . . St. Francis 

Click, Samuel Batavia 

Crist, J. E Caulksville 

Dawson, M. M Jenson 



Gephart,J. W., . Arkadelphia 

Hall, S. D., - Curtis 

Kesler, Benj. E., . Gainesville 

Lilly, J. H., Lonoke 

Neher, J. H Palestine 

Price, M. v., . . . . Harrison 
Reynolds, W. W., . . Rogers 
Sloniker, Jacob, . . . Palestine 
Watts, Wm. S., . . Brentwood 
Whitcher, W. E., . . . Austin 
Wilson, Nute Credit 

California. 

Brubaker, J. S., . . . . Merced 
Chemberlen, Geo. F., . Puente 
Cline, Justus H., . Lordsburg 

Flory,J.S 

236 S.Hancock St., Los Angeles 
Franklin, W. K., . Lordsburg 
Funk, S. W., iioo E. Pico St., 

Los Angeles 

Gibble, Isaac. Hemet 

Hoover, W. L T., . Lordsburg 

Ives, Allen, Covina 

Julius, Aaron, .... Dospalos 
Keiser, Thos., . . . Lordsburg 
Lehmer, S. G., .... Covina 
Metzger, John W., Lordsburg 
Miller, S. J., .... Redlands 
Moore, P. A., . . . Inglewood 
Myers, P. S., looi Main St., . 

East Los Angeles 

Neher, Amos A., . . Lordsburg 
Norcross, D. A.. . . Glendora 
Overholtzer, Derius, . .Covina 

Piatt, W.M Colton 

Prather, Enoch, .... Hemet 
Thomas, Wm. J., . Inglewood 
Trostle,J. W., . . . Glendora 

Wine, C Covina 

Yoder, Samuel E., . . . Hemet 

Colorado. 

Bashor, Joseph, Weld 

Click, D. M., . Grand Junction 

Early, B. F Berthoud 

Funderburgh, J.CRocky Ford 
Hildebrand, J. D., Ft. Collins 

Keltner, Lewis E., 

. . 1424 Hazel Court, Denver 

Kinzie,J.H IHff 

Hoover, John J., . . Crawford 
Larick, Henry, . . Longmont 
Love, Leonard F., Castle Rock 
Shuck, J. F.,. . . . Ft. Collins 

Smith, John I., Wray 

Stauffer, O. B., . . Rocky Ford 
Watkins, Thomas J., . . Hope 

Whistler, Levi Lyons 

Wiedman, Fred, . . Longmont 
Zern. Jacob Amherst 

District of Columbia. 

Hollinger, Albert, 

338 8th St.. S. E., Washington 



Florida. 

Leatherman, J. R., . Wabasso 
Overhultz. J. N., . . . Keuka 
Stover, D. E Hawthorn 

Georgia. 

Petry, Luther, 

.... 95 Means St., Atlanta 
Wrightsman, P. R 

261 East Hunter St., Atlanta 

Idaho. 

Faw, Ehoch Cameron 

Fogle, Caleb Nampa 

Graybill, J. H Nampa 

Gwin, J. N Moscow 

Harader, I. L., . . . . Payette 
Johnson. Stephen. . Nezperce 
Krewson. Wm. A.. . . Payette 
Thomas. G. W.. . . . Nezperce 
Weimer. James, . . . Moscow 
West, Ellis H Moscow 

Illinois. 

Amick, Joseph, Elgin 

Arnold, John Lintner 

Baker, J. H Salem 

Bakener, Fred, . . Leaf River 
Barkdoll, H M., . Warrenville 
Barnhart, John, . . Mansfield 
Barnhizer, Isaac, , Mt. Morris 

Beck, Jonas, Astoria 

Bingaman, A. L., . Cerrogordo 
Bingaman, Wm., . . Laplace 
Blickenstalf, D. J., . . Oakley 
Bowers, Peter, . . Parkersburg 
Boyer, Allen, ...... Lena 

Britt, B. F 

.... 317 Elm St., Quincy 
Brubaker, Jonathan, . Virden 
Brubaker, S. F., . . . . Girard 
Brubaker, D. E., . Mt. Morris 
Brubaker, I. E., . Riddle Hill 
Brubaker, C. C, . Wadsworth 

Brubaker, J. H Virden 

Brubaker, I. W., . . . Laplace 

Bucher, Cyrus Astoria 

Burger, Robert E., Cerrogordo 
Buckingham. Wm. I., Laplace 
Bucklew. Solomon, . . Canton 

Buckley, J. S., Girard 

Butterbaugh, J. W., Maryland 
Campbell, John F., . Idlewood 
Clapper, Sherman, . Woburn 

Cook, W. G Mt. Morris 

Cordier, Joseph, . . . Calhoun 
Cripe, John, .... Hookdale 
Cripe, George W., Cerrogordo 

Crouse, J. H Wacker 

Culler, D. D., . . . Mt. Morris 

Dale, N.S., Noble 

Delp, Jacob Pearl City 

Delp, Chas. E., . . Pearl City 
Demmy, John C, . . . Astoria 
D=e.dorff. D.. Franklin Grc-.'e 



Dierdorff, J. W., Milledgev 
Eavey, George W., . Calhc 
Eisenbise. W. H.. Mt. Can 

Fahrney, Callo, P 

Fergusen, Ashley, . . . . E 
Filbrun, B. F., . . . . Aubi 
Filbrun, J. J., ... . Sterl 

Fitz, John, Astc 

Flory, Michael Giri 

Forney, C Parkersbi 

Forney, Edmund, Pine Cr< 
Forney. Henry, .... Chei 

Fouts, S. S Sal 

Frantz. David, . . Cerrogoi 

Garber. S. W Alii: 

Gerdes, David, . . . Morrii 
Gibson, Javan, .... Gir 
Gibson, G. W., .... Gir; 
Gibson, Cullen C, . . . Gir 
Gibson, D. B., . . Cerrogo 
Gilbert, Frank, . . Pearl C 
Goodman, John W., . Wobi 
Grabill, Abraham, . . Oak 
Grater, W. H., . . . . Malvi 
Hamm, Solomon D., . Astc 
Harshbarger, Isaac, . . Gir; 
Harshbarger, John W., . . 

Jeffersonv 

Harshbarger, J. W., . '. Gir; 

Heckman, John, P 

Heitz, S., Cerrogoi 

Hershey, Daniel, . Mt. Moi 
Hicks, Oliver Z., . . Idlewc 
Hollinger, Joseph, . . Astc 
Hollinger, Daniel, . . Asto 
Holsinger. C. S.. . . Roan( 

Hudson. J. L Loving' 

Hummer, S. S., . . Colches 
Ikenberry, W. L., . Mt. Moi 

Jellison,J.H Alii; 

Jones, Joseph, Gir 

Keltner. P. R 

. . . 702 E. gth St.. Sterl 
Landes, Hiester, . Cerrogo 
Leedy, Amos, . Williamsb 
Lierly, Wm. R., . . . Clay 
Lilligh, H., . . Mulberry Gr 
Lingenfelter, Mathias, Can 

Lutz, Ezra, Wins 

Lyon, Thomas D., . . Hud 
Martin, 'Henry M., . . Lan 
Masterson, James, . . . Gir 
Masterson, J. M., . . Aub 
McClure, M. J., . . Cerrogo 
McNelly, Calvin. . Mt. Car 
Metz, Clifford W., . . Trinr 
Miller. John E.. . . Mt. Mo 

Miller. S. S Lap) 

Miller. D. M., . . Milledgev 
Miller, D. L., . . . Mt. Mc 
Miller, W. R 

. 466 Jackson Boul., Chic 
Mohler. Daniel, . Burrows' 
Moore. Wm. K., . . . . ^ 
Moore. J. H. E 



liirtiaren s haniily Ahnanac^ 



re, James M Elgin 

IS, Jacob L., . . . . Coleta 

rs, Isaac, Fandon 

rs, Franklin, . . . Lanark 
inger, G., .... Hissong 
comer, M. S., . Mt. Morris 
comer, E., . . Mt. Morris 
comer, Samuel I., Lanark 
man, Henry E., . Loraine 

3ck, Alvin Batavia 

e, David E., . . Mt. Morris 
e, E. VV., . Franklin Grove 

e, C. C Polo 

irbaugh, D. B„ . . Lanark 
ensberger, Levi, .... 

Franklin Grove 

dis, Charles, .... Ipava 
land, David, . . . Lanark 
land, C. P., . . . Lanark 

er, J. G Mt. Morris 

er, Galen B., . . . . Elgin 
;^er, D. B., Franklin Grove 
tz, John F., . . . Chenoa 

ely, J. S;, Lanark 

nberger, Jacob, Naperville 
s, Israel, ...... Lena 

el, Joseph, .... Lanark 

er, J.C., . . . Hutsonville 
key, Sherman, . . Fandon 
ffer, M., .... Mansfield 

kler. Baptist H., Loraine 
kler, H. W., . . Loraine 
ebaker, Samuel, Pearl City 
r, C. M., . Franklin Grove 
ger, Jacob, . . Hutsonville 
zer, John W., . . Roanoke 
or, Allen, . . Brownstown 
tie, W. E., . . . Stratford 
tie, Eph., . . . Mt. Morris 
tie, Levi, Franklin Grove 
t, I. Bennett, . . Lanark 
:el, David, . . Cerrogordo 
-y, Daniel, .... Divide 

Dyke, G. H., 

W. Hastings St., Chicago 
ner, D, T., . Beecher City 
ace, Lewis, . . Maryland 

, James, Virden 

e, Jacob Laplace 

mian, O. H., 

76 S. Paulina St., Chicago 

ig, E. S Chicago 

ig, I. R.. Lanark 

It, Simon E., . Mt. Morris 

Indiana. 

ir,J 

. Walton Ave., Ft. Wayne 
edge, J. S., . . Anderson 
emyer, Jesse, Nappanee 
emyer, D. H., .Nappanee 
eman, John, . . Plymouth 

r, N.E Dogwood 

hart, Wm. W 

. . . North Manchester 
ick, Isaac, . . . Portland 
)n, James, . . . Corunna 

ner, E. L Argos 

ey, 1. L., Goshen 

eimer, Isaac, . Edna Mills 
ling, S. A., . . . Kewanna 

:enstaff, S Flora 

, Daniel, .... Kokomo 



Bohn, J.S., Peru 

Bollinger,~R. B., . . . Tunker 
Bollinger, B. B., Shipshewana 
Bollinger, Daniel, Shipshewana 
Borough, Wm., North Liberty 
Bowers, A. J., . . Kirkpatrick 
Bowman, J. W., . Hagerstown 
Bowman, D.E., . Hagerstown 

Bowman, A Hagerstown 

Bowser, G. W., .... Arcadia 

Brallier, H. H Pierceton 

Branson, Isaac E., . Cammack 
Bridge, Albert, . . Monticello 
Brubaker, D. M., Williamsport 
Brubaker, Ellis S., . . . Peru 
Brunk, Henry, . . Greentown 
Burcham, Wm., . Noblesville 
Burket, Samuel E., Sevastopol 

Burrs, W. H., Carroll 

Bussard, Wm., .... Milford 
Byerly, Daniel M., . Curryville 
Campbell, D. C, . . . . Colfax 
Caylor, Abraham, . Greentown 
Caylor, D. S., . . . Somerset 
Christian, John H., . Roanoke 
Clem, Amsey E,, . . . Milford 

Cline, Geo., Kempton 

Cobb, E. M.. North Manchester 

Cripe, Jacob, Dego 

Cripe, D. C, . . . Montpelier 

Cripe, John W Goshen 

Cripe, Nathaniel, . Hillisburg 
Cripe, Israel, . . . Montpelier 
Cross, J. J. (deaf mute), . . 

Collamer 

Crosswhite, A. G., . . . Flora 
Crumrine, N. W., . . Wabash 

Davis, C, Dunkirk 

Deardorff, Henry, . . . Argos 
Deal, John, . . .^ . . Pyrmont 

Deeter, W. R Milford 

Deeter, Manly Milford 

DiUing, David, . . Monticello 
Dilling, Levi S., . Hagerstown 

Dillman, Morris Peru 

Dunbar, L. M., . . Darlington 
Dunbar, Peter, Bowers Station 
Early, Isaac, . . North Liberty 
Early, S. P., North Manchester 

Early, Mark D 

1212 Christian St., South Bend 

Eby, D. F., Westfield 

Eby, Adam, Wawaka 

Eikenberry, John, . Plumtree 
Filer, Calvin F., . . . Shideler 
Eisenhour, M. A., . New Paris 

Ellis. O.C River 

Elson, J. H., . Fairfield Center 
Everson, Thomas, . . Ladoga 
Eversole, Simon P., . Bremen 

Fair, C. G Garrett 

Felthouse, J. V Markle 

Ferrel, A.J Ober 

Fesler, Frederic, . . . .Ovid 
Finney, Wm., . . . Ft. Wayne 

Fisher, Irvin, Mexico 

Fisher, Noah Andrews 

Fisher, Frank, .... Mexico 

Fisher, Ira Colfax 

FisL :r, Enos, Kewanna 

Fitz vater, P. B Elkhart 



Flora, Riley, Flora 

Flora, John, .... Ridgeway 
Forney, Hiram, 

. . 1021 S. Main St., Goshen 
Frank, D. R., . . . . Somerset 
Frantz, Mathias, . . . Ladoga 
Frantz, John F., . . . Wabash 
Freeman, D. R., . . Star City 

Gable, Eli, Plymouth 

Garber, Henry P., . . Portland 

Garber, D. B Hanfield 

Goshorn, Benj. F., . Clay City 
Goshorn, R. R., . . Clay City 
Goshorn, G. V., . . Clay City 
Grady, Isaac S., . . . Syracuse 

Guinn, Isaiah Heath 

Gump, Jeremiah Ari 

Gustin, D. W., . . Middletown 
Hale, Darlin, .... Bourbon 
Hahn, M. L., . . . . Portland 

Hahn, J Lakeside 

Hanson, Edward M., . . Cedar 
Harshbarger, Wm. R., Ladoga 
Hartman, D. B., . South Bend 
Hartsough, Joseph, Nappanee 
Hartsough, John, .... Knox 
Haskell, Harvey P., . . Ingalls 
Hatcher, Wm. L., Adamsboro 
Hay, Frank E., . . Anderson 
Hazlett, James L., . Rossville 
Heeter, N. B., . . Millersburg 
Heeter, G. B., . ; . . Warsaw 

Heller, Jacob Decatur 

Helman, James Q., Union City 
Hedricks,S. F., . . Plymouth 

Hess, Aaron Goshen 

Hess, Wm Goshen 

Hiatt, Elihu Rigdon 

Hildebrand,C., . . South Bend 
Hilderbrand, Jacob 

Walkerton 

Hillery, Lemuel, . . . Goshen 

Hill, James Cicero 

Hodgden.Dorsey, Huntington 
Hoff, E. B., North Manchester 
Hoke, Henry, . . . Rehoboth 

Hoke, Levi Goshen 

Holler, George, . . Huntington 
Hollinger, David 

North Manchester 

Hollinger, Jacob, 

North Manchester 

Holsinger, L. T 

North Manchester 

Holsinger, Merton, Clarksville 
Hoover, David E., . . Garrett 
Hoover, David F., . . . . . 

Sulphur Springs 

Hoover, J. L., Sulphur Springs 
Hoover, Jacob, . . Hagerstown 

Hostetler, D. W Lagro 

Houk, Peter Ridgeway 

Howard, I. J., . Hartford City 

Huber, Lewis Berne 

Huber, Calvin A., . . Ligonier 
Huffman, Lewis, . . .Mt.Zion 
Huffman, Peter, . . . Elkhart 
Humbarger, Loren, .... 

....... Columbia City 

Hummer, Fred Blaine 

Hyer, Leonard, . . . Merriam 

Jones, D. H Dunlaps 

Joseph, J. E Bourbon 



Karns, Gabriel, .... Eaton 

Kauffman, J. S., Ayr 

Keim, Howard H., . . Ladoga 

Kendall, Amos Plevna 

Kennedy, James, . . Camden 
Kinsey, Lewis, . . Hagerstown 
Kirklin, J. R., New Burlington 
Kitson, John W., . Millersburg 
Kitterman, G., . . Montpelier 
Kreider, D., . . South Whitley 
Kreighbaum, H. W., S. Bend 

Kulp, J. S., Dunlaps 

Landis, Henry, . . Bringhurst 
Lanter, George M., Union City 

Lawter,W Clinton Falls 

Leckrone, S.. . N. Manchester 
Leckrone, Em., . . Silverlake 
Leedy, Joseph, . . . Andrews 
Leer, Benjamin, Shipshewana 
Livengood, Wm., . . Wabash 
Long, Peter, .... Brighton 
Long, Daniel H., .... Peru 
McCarty, Jno.S., . Clarksville 

Metz. O South Whitley 

Metzler,J., . . . . . Wakarusa 
Miller, M. C, . N. Manchester 
Miller, Isaac, . N. Manchester 
Miller, Alexander, . Wakarusa 

Miller, D. P South Bend 

Miller, J. H., Goshen 

Miller, Robert Roann 

Miller, J. W. Eaton 

Miller, William, . South Bend 

Miller, Martin Jalapa 

Miller, J. R Nappanee 

Miller, John A., . New Lisbon 

Miller, J. A., Landess 

Millspaugh, H. E., . . Gilman 

Mishler, J.D Collamer 

Mishler, John, . . Middlebury 
Mitchel, John, . . Saline City 
Montgomery, Riley, . . Flora 

Moss, Aaron Landess 

Mourer, John H., . . Goodland 

Mow, A. I., Argos 

Murray, Samuel, . . . Mexico 

Murray, J. C Nappanee 

Myers, George W., . . Laconia 

Myers, Samuel Mexico 

Nead, Daniel P Nead 

Neal, Wm. F., . . . Packerton 

Neff. A. L 

. . 621 New M. St., Goshen 

Neff, W. B Milford 

Neff, Benj., . . N.Manchester 
Neff, Daniel, .... New Paris 

Neff, James, Milford 

Neff, Henry, Roann 

Neff, Henry New Paris 

Neher, Samuel, . . Petroleum 
Neher, David, . . . Petroleum 
Noffsinger, Ezra, . Union City 
Nusbaum, John, . . Wakarusa 
Painter, G. W., . . Springport 

Parker, I. D Elkhart 

Payton, S. W., . . Connersville 
Phields, Samuel, .... Lima 
Popejoy, Wm. A,, . . . Poneto 
Pottinger, Leander, . Claypool 
Puterbaugh, A. H., . . Elkhart 
Quick, C. L., . . Cottage Grove 



36 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



Rarick. John G., 
Rarick, Jacob, . 



Royerton 
Royerton 



Rensberger.'Melvin, .... 
North Manchester 

Replogle, David, . Rogersville 

Richard, D. R Fortville 

Richardson. Scott, . Millgrove 

Rife, Jacob, Boston 

Rife, Joseph D., . . Converse 

Riggle, Daniel Goshen 

Rinehart, Abram, . . Onward 
Ritzins, Henry, . Leiters Ford 
Ritzins, Noah, . Leiters Ford 
Rodgers, J. C, . Hartford City 
Roose, Hiram, . . . Wakarusa 
Roose, Eli, .... Wakarusa 

Ross, Amos, Kinzie 

Rothenberger, D., N. Webster 
Rufner, Geo., Fairfield Center 

Ruff, Edward Argos 

Rupel, C. F Walkerton 

Rupel, Andrew, . . N. Liberty 
Schrdck, J. H., . . Middlebury 
Schrock, Elias, . . Middlebury 
Schwalm, H. M., . . Wakarusa 
Secrist, Jacob S., . . . Eugene 

Sellers, John H Bourbon 

Shepherd, Joseph M., Fortville 
Shepler, Isaac, . . Bunkerhill 

Sherrick, M. M 

North Manchester 

Shideler, Daniel, . . Majenica 
Shively, G.B., .... Topeka 
Shively, David, . . . Bourbon 
Shively, Daniel, . . . Goshen 
Shively, Daniel P., . . . Nead 
Shock, Warren D., Huntington 

Shotts, M. C, Flint 

Shutt, N. H., . . . . Brighton 
Shreve, R. J., . . . Waterford 
Simmons, W. K., . Union City 
Smeltzer, Elias, . . . Arcadia 
Smeltzer, Moses, . Noblesville 

Snell, Daniel Sidney 

Snowberger, A. C, Honeycreek 
Snowberger, Isaac N., . . Flint 
Sommers, Harvey, . Clay City 
Sonefrank, Geo., McGrawsville 

Speicher, Jacob B., 

North Manchester 

Spitzer, Joseph F., Summitville 
Stafford, John, . Spencerville 
Steckley, Henry, . . . Garrett 
Stinebaugh, Gilbert, . . Floar 
Stoneburner, Levi, . . Warsaw 
Stoneburner.J. W., . Peterson 
Stoner, Samuel D., . . Ladoga 

Stout, John Millwood 

Stout, Thos. J., . . Sharpsville 
Strausburg, John, . . . Jalapa 
Stuckman, P., . . . Nappanee 
Studebaker. J. U., . . Shideler 

Studebaker, Geo. L 

. 117 S. Council St., Muncie 

Swihart, David Roann 

Swihart, Geo. E,, . . . Roann 

Swihart, Aaron Argos 

Swihart, Neri Bigfoot 

Swihart, Walter, . Churubusco 
Swihart, George T., . . Goshen 
Swoveland. Jacobs., . Fortville 
Teeter, Lewis L., . Rogersville 



Teeter, L. W., . . Hagerstown 
Toney, Carey, . . Connersville 

Toney, W. S., Walton 

Ulery, Gabriel 

North Manchester 

Ulery, S. Stephen, 

North Manchester 

Ullery, John, .... Pyrmont 
Urey.S. C, . Fairfield Center 
Urey, J. H., . Fairfield Center 
Wageman, Jno. G., Tyner City 
Warren, Edward, . Sevastopol 
Warstler, J. H., . . New Paris 
Weaver, Joseph, . . . Ligonier 
Weaver, D. H., . . Walkerton 
Weaver, Christian, . Brimfield 
Weaver, John E., . . . Goshen 

Wellington, J. R Reed 

Whitehead, C. S., . . Oswego 
Whitmer, Daniel, South Bend 

Whitmer, Merrill I 

South Bend 

Wike, Henry River 

Wike, Isaac, .... Mooreland 
Winger, Otho, . . . Sweetsers 

Winklebleck, Levi, 

Hartford City 

Wise, A. A Middlebury 

Witter, E. C , . 

North Manchester 

Wolf, David B., Peru 

Workman, Lewis, . Pierceton 

Workman, David, 

Columbia City 

Wray, Benj Camden 

Wright, A. L 

North Manchester 

Wright, J. H., . . Huntington 
Wysong, Daniel, . . Nappanee 
Yaney, Frank, . New Corydon 
Yoder, Y. D., . . . . Brighton 
Younce, Samuel, .... Eaton 

Young, A. C, Eaton 

Zollers, Geo. D., ..... . 

545 Cushing St., South Bend 
Zumbrun, C. K., . . Merriam 

Iowa. 

Albright, Wm. 



Steamboat Rock 
Allen, J. Rothrock, . Dumont 
Allen, Harvey W., . . Dumont 
Anderson, Victor, Libertyville 
Atkinson, Robert, . Kingsley 
Badger, Robert, . . . Panther 
Badger, Samuel, . . . Panther 

Bailey, John P Mt. Etna 

Beale, Jesse, .... Waterloo 
Beaver, O. J., . Fredericksburg 
Berkman,\Hiram, . . . Fredric 
Blough, A. P., . . . Waterloo 
Bosserman, Levi D., . . . . 

Prairie City 

Bowser, Samuel 

Green Mountain 

Brower, Jacob, South English 
Brower, C. M., South English 

Brower, Alfred, Dale 

Brower, S. F., . South English 
Brower, Peter, . South English 
Brower, Jacob J., Marshalltown 

Buck, Abraham Ireton 

Cakerice, John, Conrad Grove 
Coffman, H. C. N 

South English 



Connell,B. F Brooklyn 

Dierdorff, Daniel T., . Pierson 

Dierdorff, M Yale 

Diehl, John Carnforth 

Diehl, J. B Carroll 

Diehl, J. W Panora 

Eikenberry, J. E 

Farnhamville 

Eikenberry, Harvey, . Greene 

Eikenberry, J. F Greene 

Emmert, M. W., Cedar Rapids 
Farneman, Frank, Des Moines 

Fike,J.H. Waterloo 

Flora, A. W Maxwell 

Flory, Samuel, . South English 

Folger, W. W Folger 

Follis, John Fredric 

Frederic, C, . Grundy Center 

Funk, Peter Gallion 

Gable, John Ollie 

Garner, Chas., Grundy Center 
Gilchrist, Joseph, . . Fairfield 
Gilliam, H., . Fredericksburg 
Glotfelty.Wm. N., Libertyville 
Goughnour, S. M., . . Ankeny 
Goughnour, James Q., Elkhait 
Hagerman, Geo., . . Toddville 
Harman, B. J., . Bladensburg 
Haughtelin, J. D., . . . Panora 
Haughtelin, Irving, . . Panora 
Herman, Michael, . . . Adair 
Hiatt, Nathan C, . . Atlantic 

Holder, Daniel Batavia 

Honberger, S. A., 

Nora Springs 

Hopwood, G. W., . Deepriver 
Jones, J. Edwin, Grundy Center 
Keller, J. H., . . . Livingston 

Keller, J. E Tipton 

Kob, L. M., . . . Gardengrove 
Leavell, O. W., . . Unionville 
Lehman, Franklin, . . Pierson 
Lichty, W.H., .... Calvin 
Long, W. Joseph, . . . Tipton 
Long, W. H., . . . . Garrison 
Markley, David, . . . Mt.Etna 
Mathis, Jefferson, . Winterset 

Maust, C. H Struble 

Maust, H. F., Struble 

McCune, R. F., Dallas Center 

McNutt, C. S., Adel 

Miller, S. P., . . . New Sharon 

Miller, S. M Calvin 

Miller, S. B., Zearing 

Miller, N.J. , .... Waterloo 
Miller, B. F., . . Dallas Center 

Miller, S. C Brooklyn 

Miller, D. W Robins 

Moats, John W., . . . Altoona 

Mortin, Silas Corning 

Myers, Michael, 

... 701 Devoe St., Creston 

Myers, Abram Panther 

Myers, Tobias Sheldon 

Nicodemus, Albert, . Kingsley 
Og'den, Orlando, . . Unionville 

Peifer, L. R 

.... 1102S. St., Waterloo 

Pyle, W. H Hansel] 

Rambow, Geo., Douds Station 
Reeves, Alfred H., . . Dickens 
Replogle, Martin, . Unionville 



Ridenour, John, . . . Gar 
Rodabaugh, Willis, . . Fr 

Rodabaugh, E. G 

Birminj 

Rolston, J. E Sh( 

Rowe, Chas., Gi 

Sadler, J. W., . . . Limes] 
Sanger, Anthony, ... I 

Sayler, Levi, Qi 

Schmidt, John G 

Strawberry] 

Schmidt, Chas. C , 

.....*. Strawberry 1 
Schultz, Joshua, . . .Ell' 
Shamberger, Geo. A., . . 

Dallas O 

Shellenberger, S. H., . Bic 

Shick,J.N Lo^ 

Simpson, A. P., . . . Mt. '. 

Sink, David Mt. : 

Sissler, M Dallas C« 

Sloatman, S., . Missouri V 
Snyder, J, S., . . . Broo 
Snyder, L. S., Missouri V 

Spicher, J,. Wat( 

Stickler, W. E., . . Centei 
Stieneke, F. S., . . . . Au 
Stone, C. H., . . . Edge\ 
Stone, Henry, . . . Edge^ 

Stauffer, E. H Gari 

Stout, Jerry Oskal 

Strickler, H. P., . . . . . 

Grundy Ce 

Sutter, P. J Lau 

Tannreuther, W." 0„ . . Cj 

Taylor, H.R 

1837 E. Grand Ave.,De's Mo 
Troup, Henry H., . . Max 
Webb, Isaac E., . Newma 
Weber, John, . Dallas Ce 

West, W. E Ank 

Wheeler, Frank M., . Rod 

Whisler, H. A U 

Wingert, Harry H., . . G 
Wolf, F. B., . . . . Lake I 
Wolf, Abraham, . Liberty 

Wolf, C. E Liberty 

Zook, Daniel, . . Birmingl 
Zuck, John Clare 

Kansas. 

Andes, Levi, Nevi 

Arnold, C. E., . . McPhei 
Armentrout, G. W., . Digl 
Barnhart, D. B., . Appan< 

Basehore,G. H 

Box 495, Abi! 

Basket, B. S Sab< 

Baumbaugh, J. S., . Moonl 
Beckner, W. O.. . McPho 

Beery, Salem McC 

Bennet, D. H., . .. Minneaj 
Betts, David, . Independt 
Blickenstaff, Jesse, . . Ott 
Bowers, David, .... Sabi 
Bowman, Daniel, . . Burj 

Bowser, J.J Clevei 

Boyd, A, L., . . . . Brazi 
Boyer, Simon, . . Garden < 
Brammell, H. L., . . Ozai 
Brough, Jacob A., . . . G 

Brower, John Dorr: 

Brown, S. M., . . Gardenp 



Brethretis Family Almanac, 



37 



n, Charles C, . . Abilene 
'n, C. H., . • • • Navarre 
aker, Henry T., . . Chase 
aker, Moses E., . . Lyons 
aker, Isaac S., . Mitchell 
aker, Jonathan, . Mitchell 
holder, John, . . Holland 
m, O. O., . . . . Ramona 
;rt, Jos. G., . Hutchinson 
per, John, . . Greatbend 

, J. F., Menlo 

r, Ephraim^. . . Sabetha 
irt, George, . . Mont Ida 

!, David B Dunlap 

man, G. W Walker 

, Isaac H., . . . Gardner 

, Henry F Gardner 

, D. A., Quinter 

ipacker, F. H., . Redfield 
:ett, Albion C, . . Rydal 

3, Wm., Morrill 

jy, A. M., . . McPherson 

ling, A. S Gridley 

J. G., . . . . Summerfield 

Enoch, Booth 

iberry, J. W., . Altamont 
bise, T. A., . . . MorrilF 

bise, P. J Sabetha 

bise, John, .... Morrill 

, G. R Centropolis 

t, George W., Nickerson 

, S. L Piedmont 

3y, H. E., .... Burroak 

ater, L. W Colbert 

, L. H Emporia 

!y, Benj Abilene 

r, Samuel, . . Herington 

E. S., Walker 

z, J. R., Beattie 

z, Edward, . McPherson 
d, George W., . Edmond 

3enry, Atwood 

gle, Addison, . . Belpre 
, Jacob, Conway Springs 
!r, J. R., . Rockwell City 
;r, C. S., . . . Fort Scott 
, Isaac B. . . Appanoose 
, George, . . . Madison 
iT, Martin D., Washington 
^, John M., . Washington 

, E.J Garnett 

, Godfrey Paola 

man, Samuel, . . Morrill 
;, J. F., . ,. . . . Abilene 
ler, C, . Arkansas City 
ler, Lee, . Arkansas City 
sh, Jacob, . . . Dorrance 
ibarger, J. P., McPherson 
iman, Samson, .... 

Centropolis 

nan.C. T 

.... Michigan Valley 

% Samuel, . . . Belleville 

ler, Ephraim 

Pleasantgrove 

ter, Jonas, Pawnee Rock 

Dg,P. H. Olathe 

y^, James E., . Overbrook 
3, W. B., . . ^ Dorrance 
ien, Merrill, . Galesburg 
ien, Sidney, . Galesburg 
gerjohn Russell 



Holsinger, Wm. . . . Rosedale 
Holsinger, D. R., . . Belleville 

Hoover, Isaac L Alfred 

Hooper, C.J. , .... Topeka 

Hultgren, O Marquette 

Hutchison, A., . . McPherson 
Jarboe, J. W., .... Lovewell 

Johnson, Wm., 

• • 1533 Orange St., Wichita 
Katherman, S. B., . Lawrence 
Keller, Michael, . . Nickerson 

Kuns, Geo. D , . 

.... Box 120, McPherson 

Lantz, S. E Thrall 

Lauver, Geo. M., . St. Francis 
Leaman, W. H., . . . Meriden 

Lerew, Lewis, Portis 

Lerew, Isaac S., . . . . Portis 
Lichtenwalter, A. B., . Neutral 
Longanecker, Daniel, . . Paola 
Lugenbeel, Wm., . . . Narka 
Mahorney, J. W., . . .Brooks 
Manon, George, . Gypsum City 

Martin, D. B., Albert 

Masterson, E. K., McPherson 
Merkey, Jacob, . Washington 
Meyers, David, . New Cambria 

Meyers, J. D., Tampa 

Miller, Isaac H., . . Abbyville 

Miller, A. F., Booth 

Miller, W.H Westphalia 

Miller, E. J., Olathe 

Miller, Andrew G., . . Walton 
Mishler, M. J., . . . . Monitor 

Mohler,J. S Morrill 

Moomaw, Amos, . Wilsonton 

Myers, S. L Webber 

Myers, David R., New Cambria 
Neher, Martin, .... McCune 

Nelson, N. P Rosalia 

Newton, C. H., . . . . Parsons 

Numer, J. H Ft. Scott 

Pearsoll, A. L Dunlap 

Peck, Francis M Catalpa 

Perry, Jasper N., 

, Conway Springs 

Peterson, Marinus, Lablanche 
Peterson, T. C, . . Herington 

Phillippi, Wm. R Hope 

Puterbaugh, A., . . . Ozawkie 
Puterbaugh, J. P., . Nickerson 

Renner, Eh, Burroak 

Rock, James Nava,rre 

Robinson, T. A., . . . Redfield 

Rose, W. A., Booth 

Royer, U. S Newton 

Root, C. C, Gardner 

Root, Andrew, . . Centropolis 
Root, John A., .... Ozawkie 

Sawyer, W. H. H Morrill 

Sell, Arthur, . . . McPherson 

Sell, A. K Fredonia 

Sell, Wm. B.,. . . .Fredonia 

Shamberger, J. H., 

...... Medicine Lodge 

Shank, C. A., . . . . Donegal 

Sharp, Geo. H., . . . .Atwood 

Shatto, A., Abilene 

Shatto, Luther Abilene 

Shenk, Daniel M., . Dorrance 
Sherfy, John, Michigan Valley 
Shideler, Henry, . . . Mineral 



Shirk, Jacob B Ramona 

Shoemaker, C. W., Appanoose 

Slifer, C. H Bird City 

Smith, L. S 

. 1548 Pacific Ave., Atchison 

Smith, H. J. Herington 

Smith, Daniel Cuba 

Snyder, J. M., . . .McPherson 
Sprague, Byron, . . Lablanche 
Stauffer, Albert A., • Fredonia 
Stockmyer, Wm., . . Harding 

Stoner, D.W Vesper 

Stouder, David W., . Emporia 
Strickler, Ellis, . . . Ramona 
Studebaker, J. E., . . Mont Ida 
Studebaker, Simon E 

Summerfield 

Studebaker, George E., . . . 

McPherson 

Studebaker, Jesse, . Mont Ida 
Studebaker, G. W., . Edgerton 
Talhelm, Humphrey, .... 

Washington 

Thomas, J.iA;, Fred 

Thompson, Stephen, Fredonia 
Throne, G. M., Rockwell City 
Trapp, Nicholas, . . Altamont 

Trostle, J. D Hope 

Troxel, Jacob, Conway Springs 
Ullery, Jacob, . , McPherson 
UUom, Homer, .... Friend 

Ulrey, John C Grenola 

Ulrich, Frederick, . . Fredonia 
Vaniman, Daniel, . McPherson 
Wagner, J. C, ..... Portis 

Wallace, Carl Morrill 

Wampler, Chas Olathe 

Watkins, Lafayette, Mont Ida 

Weddle, G. W Dunlap 

Weddle, R. M Dunlap 

Wertz, John B Quinter 

Weybright, Wm., . . . Alfred 
Wheeler, Elliot, . . . Gridley 

Whitmer,B.B McLouth 

Whitmer, Peter, . . . Hamlin 
Wieand, Albert C, McPherson 

Wine, Geo. S Herington 

Wine, Geo. S Madison 

Winey, Thomas, . . Lawrence 
Wise, W. M., Michigan Valley 

Wise, Geo. E Olathe 

Wise, John, . Conway Springs 
Witmore, Jacob, . McPherson 
Wolfe, Leonard, . . . McCune 

Wolfe, E. M Monmouth 

Wyatt.R Santa Fe 

Yoder, R. A., .... Sabetha 

Yoder, J.J., Conway 

Young, Theodore B., . Wichita 

Kentucky. 

Cripe, D. E., Hatcher 

Culp, A. S., . . Campbellsville 

Field, Louis, Pilgrim 

Jones, Louis, Cubage 

Scalf, James E., . . . . Rural 

Louisiana. 

Coffman, J. M Roanoke 

Lewis, S.E Roanoke 

Miller, Lewis Grayson 

Minix, Jos Lakeside 

Sutter, A. A., . . . . Roanoke 



Maryland. 

Anthony, F. D., . Hagerstowtt 
Ausherman, Chas. F,, Ellerton 
Ausherman, D., . Burkittsville 
Barnhart, A. B., . Hagerstown 

Barto, Isaac Cordova 

Beeghly, James W., . Accident 
Beeghly, Jeremiah, . Accident 
Bixler, Uriah, . . Westminster 
Bonsack,Chas.D., Westminster 
Bricker, Jacob, . . Downsville 
Brown, Jer., . . New Windsor 
Brumbaugh, L. R., . . Dentoa 
Brunner, Edward S., . . Pearl 
Burall, Jesse M., . New Market 
Buterbaugh, J. O., .' . . . . 

.... West Beaver Creek 
Buzzard, John M., . . Ellerton 
Castle, Noah P., . Brownsville 
Coffman, T. Rodney, Fairplay 
Deanor, H. C, . . Brownsville 
Digman, T. B., Mt. Lake Park 
Digman, S. P., Mt. Lake Park 
Ecker, Greenbury, Uniontowtt 
Englar.Wm. Philip.Uniontown 
Fahrney, Peter D., . Frederick 

Fike,S.K Grantsville 

Foltz, Samuel, . . Hagerstown 
Franklin, W. H., . Sams Creek 
Green, John C, . Lonaconingr 

Harp, Geo. S Ellerton 

Highbarger, O. S., Burkittsville 
Hochstettler, D., Engles Mills 
Hutchison, Jas. A., . Cordova 
Keller, Jacob S., . . Millstone 
King, Joshua Y., . . . . Griffin 
Kolb, T. J., Double Pipecreek 

Larkins, S. O., 

(Rowland Park), Baltimore 
Leatherman, . Geo., Harmony 
Long, Caleb, . . . Boonsbora 
Long, D. Victor, . . Fairplay 
Martin, Harvey J., . . Cearfoss- 
Martin, N., . . . Hagerstown 
Merrill, David M., Lonaconing- 
Metz, Daniel O., . . Johnsville 
Miller, Sam'I, . . Eagles Mills 

Miller, S. A Cove 

Myers, John, .... Millstone 
Neibert, F. J., . Broadfording 
Oberlin, Allen A., . . . Easton 
Otto, John E., . . Sharpsburg 
Price, Joseph, . . . Lineboro- 
Rairigh, Geo. S., . . . Denton 
Reichard, W. S., . Hagerstown 
Renner, F. C, . New Midway 
Robeson, Jesse J., Lonaconing: 
Roop, Joel, . . . New Windsor 
Roop, Jesse, . . New Windsor 
Roop, Wm. E., . Westminster 
Rowland, A., . . Hagerstown. 

Rowland, John, Reid. 

Sappington, G. K., Johnsville 

Sayler, D. R., 

Double Pipecreek 

Secrist, Caleb, » . . . Cordova 
Shoop, S. B., . . . Mapleville 
Sines, W. T., . , . . Oakland 
Smith, John, . . . Woodbury 
Snader, A. P., . New Windsor 
Stoner, David, . . . Johnsville 



38 



Brethren' s Family Almanac. 



Stoner, Solomon, . Uniontown 

Stoner, E. W., . Union Bridge 

..Stouffer, Eph., . New Windsor 

Thompson, I, O., . . Kearney 

Utz, S. H New Market 

Utz, John H Kump 

Wampler, D.S., . Lonaconing 
Warner, Jos. (col), . Cordova 
Waller, Jacob, . . . Millstone 

Weybright,J.S 

Doubl* Pipecreek 

Wingard, Jos. D„ . . . Oxford 

Wolf, D. S Collington 

Yourtee. Eli, . . Brownsville 

Michigan. 

Albaugh, J. E CInf'y 

Baker, David, . Shepherdsville 

Baker, Levi Olney 

Bollinger, Samuel, . . . Ferris 
Chambers, J. W., . . . . Brice 

Chambers, D., Brice 

Flory, David Nashville 

Hartman, Martin, . . . Custer 

Hufford, Isaac Clarion 

Lair, John M., Custer 

Messner.Peter B., Lake Odessa 

Munson, A. A Lagrange 

Overholt, Jonas, . . . Dutton 
Rairigh, Isaiah, . . Woodland 
Rairigh, Isaac F., . Campbell 
Replogle, J. C, . . Buchanan 
Seas. Oliver, .... Nashville 

Sherrick, J. F Ithaca 

Smith, S.M. Campbell 

Smith, J. M Woodland 

Sower, D. E., Sickles 

Sprang, Godfry, White Pigeon 
Stone, Geo. E., . . Carson City 

Stutsman, J. R.. 

Harbor Springs 

Stutsman, C. H Elmdale 

Thomas, David, . . . Bangor 
Tombaugh, Jacob, . . Rodney 
Towns, H., . Woodland Center 
Wallick, A.B., . Bloomingdale 
"Weaver, William, . Glendora 
■AVeaver, Geo. E., . Buchanan 

Minnesota. 

Broadwater, J., . Greenleafton 
Burkholder, J., . Worthington 
Eikenberry, W. H., .... 

Worthington 

Fishbaugher, H., . . Granger 
Hillery, C, . . . Worthington 
Xellar, D. H.. . . Worthington 

Lewis, Arthur Utica 

•Oblinger. Samuel, . Waterville 
Richard, Wolford, . Waterville 

Whetstone, D., 

' Minnesota City 

Wirt, John H., . . Lewistown 
Wirt, Jacob Lewistown 

Missouri. 

Adkins, J. M Cabool 

Baer, M. T Fristoe 

Barnhart, George, . Carthage 
Blackquell, John, East Prairie 
Bowman, D., .... Glensted 

Bray, W. T., Ladue 

BresheaVS. Burr E., . . Avery 



Brooks, J. W., . Warrensburg 
Burghart, Peter, . Centreview 
Calvert, Noah H., . . Richards 
Campbell, James A., . Fristoe 

Clark, Wm. H Sheridan 

Clemens, G. W., Stet 

Cruea, Moses, . . Farreriburg 
Crumpacker, A. H., . Rinehart 
Deleplain, John, . Waynesville 

Dove, F. W Cabool 

Eby, Ira P Poplar Bluff 

Eby, L. H Mound City 

Ehlers, Henry, . . Littlerock 
EUenberger, Geo. W., Turney 

Eilenberger.W.S Polo 

EUenberger, J. E., . . . . Polo 

Etter, Henry, Kidder 

Fike, Geo. D Racine 

Garber, Joel, . . . Marmaros 
Gault, Samuel, .... Avilla 

Gilbert, J. Z Plattsburg 

Glick, Joel, .... Mound City 

Greenwood, J. W Cabool 

Harris, James P., . . . David 
Harris, Isham, . . Grangeville 

Harris, W.D Cabool 

Harris, I. L Cabool 

Harvey, William, . ; . Jasper 
Harvey, Amos, .... Jasper 
Hays, J. S., . . . . Cherrybox 

Hipes, Wm. C Kidder 

Holderman, Chris., . Carthage 
Holloway, James, . Centreview 
Holsopple, W. W., . . Fortuna 
Hugendougler, J., . Deepwater 

Hylton, B. B. Idumea 

Hylton, Joseph B., . . Idumea 
Hylton, John W. B., . . Olathe 

Ihrig, J. B., Avery 

John, E. E Leeton 

Jordan, J. L Collins 

Killingsworth, Abel, . Rainey 
Lapp, Christian, . Cherrybox 
Lehman, Josiah, . St. Martins 

Lentz, G. W., Adrian 

Leslie, Alonzo, .... Nevada 

Lesley, Eli, Nevada 

Lutz, G. H., . . . . St. Joseph 
1017 Felix St. 

Lutz, Orman H., . St. Joseph 
Box 526. 

Macy, Lewis, = . Fox 

Markey, E. A., . . Centerview 

Mason, J. T Cabool 

Mason, John H., Stet 

Mays, J. C, .... Cedarville 
McDonald, A. C, . . . Hardin 

Miller, D. A Kidder 

Miller, S. B,, . ; . Plattsburg 
Miller, I.N.,. . . . Norborne 
Mohler, Jesse, . Warrensburg 
Mohler, John E., Warrensburg 

Mohler, D. L Leeton 

Mohler, Harvey H., . . Latour 
Mohler, D. M., . Warrensburg 
Mohler, M.S...... Leeton 

Mohler, Levi, . . Warrensburg 

Mohler, J. M., Leeton 

Morris, Richard, . . . Triplet 

Oren, Noah, Carthage 

Overfelt, Samuel, Gravelpoint 



Reece, Enos J., . . Grangeville 
Rhodes, D. B., . Rockingham 
Rhodes, Sidney, . Rockingham 
Rodebaugh, A., . . . . Collins 
Royer, Jesse E., . . . Holliday 

Rust, Raburn S Avery 

Sadler, J Kidder 

Sell, Joseph B., . . . Cameron 
Sell, Daniel D., . . Plattsburg 
Shamberger, Jesse, . Sheridan 

Shank, J. B Cherrybox 

Sharp, S. Z Plattsburg 

Shirky,Sam. B., Rockingham 
Shirkey, John H., Rockingham 
Simmons, Thos. J., . . Osceola 
Snoeberger, A. L., . Plattsburg 

Stair, M. E Polo 

Steffen, Conrad, . . . Newark 

Stevens, S. M., Cabool 

Stump, Solomon, Waynesville 

Sturgis, John, Perrin 

Sunderland, Henry, Carthage 
Taylor, S. C, . . Whitesville 

Teeter, D. W Jasper 

Tingley, H Jerico 

Troxel, J. J., . Mountaingrove 
Tucker, John, . Hagers Grove 
Tyson, Abram S., . Mansfield 
Wagoner, Isaac N., . . Nevada 
Wampler, Amos, Knobnoster 
Weaver, A. A., . . Mound City 
Weimer, Samuel, . . . Jerico 
Whitestine, Wm., . . Modena 

Wine, Samuel Jasper 

Wine, Daniel D Nevada 

Witmore, Ira Adrian 

Yearout, Chas. M 

420 Franklin St., Warrensburg 

Montana. 

Early, John Kalispeel 

Nebraska. 

Bashor, Daniel . . Holmesville 

Beckner, Perry, Filley 

Berkeybile, Aaron, . . Dubois 

Clark, B. O Pickrell 

Colebank, Wm. J., . . Russell 

Couser, D. G Rokeby 

Davis, W.H., Sidney 

Dell, Isaac Hamilton 

Fike, D. M Carleton 

Fitz, Conrad, . . . Red Cloud 

:^lory, James Shickley 

Forney, D. H., . . Davenport 
Forney, S. M., .... Kearney 

Gish, J. W Holmesville 

Heckler, Jesse Y., . Elmwood 

Heiny, D. B Shickley 

Humbarger, John, . . Verdon 
Ikenberry, John, .... Nora 
Kelso, Jonathan, . . Carleton 

Kindig, J. J., Juniata 

Lapp, Oliver J., . . Moorefield 

Lemon, J. D., Juniata 

Light, Caleb, Decatur 

McCrea, James, . . . Berwyn 

McCue, B. M Juniata 

McLellan, W. P., . . Litchfield 
Meek, Levi L., . . . . Octavia 
Mishler, George, . Cambridge 



Mohler, Wm Falls 1 

Moore, J. B Oct 

Nelson, N. B., Jun 

Nickey, AmosJ Jur 

Nofziger. J. P., ... . Ma 

Peck, Jacob C Falls 

Peters, Owen, . . Holmes 

Reed, A. G Glen 

Reiff, J. B Holmes 

Ross, Henry H.. . . Hami 

Rothrock, E. S Car 

Ryan, J. S., : , 

Shaffer, Levi, .... Beai 
Shick, Urias, . . . Holmes 

Slingluff.John U Sic 

Smith, Adam R Rol 

Smith, C. B Rede 

Snavely, John L 

Snavely, I. C Kea 

Ave. I and i6t 
Sollenberger, Aaron D., . 

Pici 

Thomas, Isaac, 

VanDyke, Archibald, . . 

24BellSt.,Bea 

Wagoner, Noah B., . Rede 

*Wells, Nelson, L 

Westrick, O., Du 

Wine, John M., . . . . Oct 

Wine, D. G Oct 

Wright, J. C M 

Yoder, Stephen, . Holmes 
Young, J. E., Bea 

New Jersey. 

Hoppock,J.D., Sergeants 
Hyde, Robinson, . Sandb 

Moore, C. W Sandb 

Reiff, J. C, . . Sergeants 

New York. 

Ulery. J. Edson, . . Broo 
1393 3d 

North Carolina. 

Bradshaw, John, . , Brum 

Bradley, E. J., Sa 

Branscom, Geo. A.,Melvin 

Faw, C. R S: 

Foss, Lewis, .... Lagr 

Griffeth, J. M Brum 

Handy, Wm. H 

Kilpatrick, J. W., . . Fis 
Laughrun, A. M., . . . R 
Laughrun, Marion, . . P 
Miller, Henderson, . . C< 
Miller, Geo. W., .... CI 
Miller, Jonathan, . . . C' 
Owens, Martin G., . . Tra 
Peterson, E., . Hollow P( 
Peterson, Solomon, Brum 
Peterson, John H., . Brum 

Prather, M Cn 

Prather, H. M Cn 

Reed, A.J Scot 

Reed, Wm. A Scot 

Robinson, J. F S 

Sheets, E. M C: 

Sheets, Adam Tra 

Sheets, Henry, . . . . C 

Sheets, Andrew, 

Sheets, Jesse, .... La: 



Brethreris Family Almaiiac. 



39 



lie, John C, . . Scottville 
lie, H., .... Transon 

North Dakota. 

John, .... Carrington 
le, Howard J., . Kenmare 
le, John P., . . Kenmare 

,C. F Cando 

ton, Walter York 

hly, Martin, . . . .Cando 
Frederick, . Carrington 

3orff, Isaac Cando 

sole, Silas N., Devils Lake 
iough, J., . Grand Harbor 
)aker, A. W., . Kenmare 
ird, D. A., . . . . Cando 

, John, Bowbells 

mn, Wm. J., . Carrington 
ane, John, . .... .Knox 

r, David A York 

r, L. E Zion 

s, Jos. L., Cando 

r, Andrew, .... Cando 
im, David H., Carrington 
, Lewis, . New Rockford 
:h, A. H., . . Carrington 

s, AmosB., Zion 

s, Jesse, Cando 

afh, Daniel York 

rt, J. C, Cando 

;ly, J.K., Cando 

baugh,G. W., Carrington 

r.G.W Cando 

ker, Geo Mayville 

art, Geo., .... Mayville 

lias, J. L Cando 

/er. J. A., . . . Bowbells 
dard, A. B Cando 

Ohio. 

Id, Perry A., . Meramora 
Id, Whitmore, . Somerset 
/ell, E. B., . . . Bremen 
r, H. M., . West Newton 

r, Henry Baker 

;, Chas. A., Williamstown 
hart, J. E., . N. Hampton 
ick, H. M., . . . . Eaton 

le,EIi, Ada 

. Wm.M Degraff 

hly, John W., . . Dayton 
nan, Adam, . . . Chicago 

eybile, D., Delta 

eybile, S. P Delta 

ler, S. W Hillgrove 

:s, William, . . Covington 
;walter, L. A., . Trotwood 

erman, Eleazar 

Mt. Blanchard 

nari, J. J., , New Lebanon 
it,J.C., . . New Lebanon 

'n, John, Bryan 

aker, A., Gratis 

aker, David, Loudonville 
aker, J. F.,W. Alexandria 
ibaugh, Jesse K., . Union 
ibaugh, John H., Clayton 
ibaugh. A., . , . Bradford 
ibaugh, Jacob, . Pitsburg 

I, Amos, Latty 

er, S. J„ ...... Baltic 

ly, David, ..... Lima 



Byers, David, Canton 

Calvert, W. Q Mayhill 

Calvert, Wm Bell 

Carper, George, 

. . East Akron Sta., Akron 

Christian, J. H., . Gettysburg 
Clapper, Daniel, . . Louisville 

Coate, David, Celina 

Coppock, Samuel, 

Tippecanoe City 

Coppock, Jacob, 

Tippecanoe City 

Cordier, F. P Celina 

Coy, Aaron, Dayton 

Crowell, Devolt, . . Bradford 

Danford, E. M Sidney 

Deary, James E., . . . Alvada 
Dessenberg, Wm., . . Ashland 

Detrick, J. B., Earley 

Dickey, L. H Alvada 

Dolby, Wiley, . . Jeffersonville 

Driver, Jacob Lima 

Driver, S. L, Lima 

Driver, Samuel Lima 

Eby, Josiah Dayton 

Eby, Henry H Eldorado 

England, W. F Ashland 

Erbaugh, G. W., New Lebanon 
Feightner, Levi, .... Amoy 

Fidler, J.W Centre 

Fink, Samuel, . Green Springs 
Filbrun, David S., . . Brandt 

Flory, Henry Defiance 

Flory, John, Jewell 

Frantz, J. L., Degraff 

Frantz, Isaac, . . Pleasanthill 
Freed, Peter, . . . New Stark 
Fuller, Harry, . . . Oakwood 
Garber, Simon, . . . Fremont 
Garber, Jacob, . . . Trotwood 

Garst.J.O. Dayton 

Garver, D.M., . Farmersville 
Garver, Samuel, . . Chatham 

Goubeau, J. C Celina 

Graham, J. H., . . Downington 
Groff, Joseph, . . . Covington 
Groff, Nathan, . . North Star 
Grossnickle, S. P., . Edenton 
Gump, H., . Tippecanoe City 
Gump, S. S., Tippecanoe City 

Guthrie, W.R Herring 

Guthrie, J. L Herring 

Hahn, M. W ,. 

North Georgetown 

Harman, Wm., . . Tontogany 

Harp, James, Hedges 

Harrold, Albert, . Columbiana 
Heestand, A. I., . . Smithville 
Heistand, Jacob, . . . Hoaglin 

Heifer, P., Granger 

Helm, C. A Smithville 

Hendrickson, D. C, .... 

West Milton 

Hershey, E., . . . Gettysburg 
Hochstettler, Josiah, Mt. Hope 

Hoke, Jonas Leetonia 

Holler, George, .... Dayton 
Hollinger, Moses, . . . Baker 
Hollinger, Eli, . . Bloomcenter 

Holmes, Eli Smithville 

Honeyman, B. F., . . . Center 
Hoover, Jonathan,- . . . Oran 



Hoover, Cyrus, . Weilersville 
Hoover, Tobias, . . Chatham 
Hoover, Joseph J., . Barryville 
Horn, Elijah, .... Roseville 
Horning, Sam'l, New Lebanon 
Horning, Jonas, . . Johnsville 
Hyer, Enoch, . West Carleton 
Irvin, David M., . . . Orrville 
Jones, Henry, . . West Milton 
Kahler, J. F., Box 127, Canton 

Keiser, J.W Primrose 

Keith, C. W Maplewood 

Keller, Henry, . North Liberty 
Kessler, Jos., . Pleasant Home 
Killian, John W., . . Antwerp 
Kimmel.J.T., ... Hartville 
Kinsley, Chas., . . . Hartville 
Kintner, Jacob, .... Moats 
Kintner. W. I.. . Mark Center 
Klepinger, William, . Dayton 
Klepinger, A. L., . . . Dayton 

Koch, D. P Karle 

Kollar, G. v., 

New Philadelphia 

Kollar, P., . New Philadelphia 

Krabill,JohnP Prairie 

Krabill, C Farmer 

Kreider, Tobias, Painter Creek 

Kurtz, J. H Poland 

Kurtz, John, .... Hartville 
Landis, Joseph, . . . Gordon 
Landis, Bartley, . Hollowtown 
Leatherman, D., New Carlisle 
Leckrone, Quincy, . Glenford 
Light, Joseph B., Greenspring 
Longanecker, J., 

West Manchester 

Longanecker, H. C, .... 

. . . !. 729 South St., Sidney 
Longanecker, Noah, Hartville 
Loomis, Ed., 

New Philadelphia 

Loose, S. M., .... Fremont 
Lytle, David, .... Deshler 

Mahler, Geo Pioneer 

Mallow, W. D., . . . .Austin 

Mark, John, ....... Edon 

Martin, J. F., . . . . Bradford 

May, James, (col.), Circleville 
May, Charles E., (col.), . . 

Circleville 

McKimmey, Perry, Metamora 
McKimmey, Wm., . Metamora 
Miller, Daniel, .... Mendon 
Miller, Abednego, . . Degraff 
Miller, Sam'l, West Alexandria 
Miller, D. B., . . . Red River 

Miller, I. B Gettysburg 

Minnich, David, . . . Cosmos 
Minnich, Granville, . Potsdam 

Mishler,J. G Suffield 

Mohler, George, .... Boyd 
Moherman, Tully S., Ashland 
Moomaw, Robert, . Smithville 

Mote, Harvey, Vine 

Muntis, Samuel, . Mt. Vernon 

Murray, Wm. A Polk 

Murray, James, . . Smithville 
Ockerman, J. E., . . Highland 
Ockerman, A., . . . Highland 
Oliver, David H., . . Trotwood 
Orr, Samuel, . . . Brovvnsville 



Petry, Benj. F Gratis 

Petry, Stephen, . . . Glenkarn 
Pittenger, J. M., . Pleasanthill 
Pittenger, John, . . . Spencer 
Plauger, A. J., . . . . Hoaglin 
Porter, Samuel E., . Bradford 
Pringle, Joseph, . . . Edenton 
Prowant, Daniel, . Continental 
Quinn, Wm. H., 

117 4th St., Canton 

Reed, Charley, . . . Wauseon 
Reese, J. W., . . . Jerry City 
Rittenhouse, E. M., . Primrose 
Robison, Joseph, .... Carey 
Rodecker, Thomas, . Mendon 

Roop, Israel, Attica 

Rosenberger, I. J., . Covington 
Rosenberger, A. S., Covington 
Rosenberger, E. H., McComb 
Royer, S. D., . . . . Bradford 
Sandy, Jacob D., Donnellsville 

Sellers, G. W., Bryan. 

Setty, Sanford, Sinking Spring- 
Shank, E., Dayton 

Sharp, B. F Greenville 

Shellaberger, John, . Rockford 
Shively, Aaron, .... Bayard 

Sholty, B. F., Pioneer 

Shong, David, . . . Sherwood. 
Shroyer, Reuben, . . . Canton 

Shutt, H. M Baltic 

Smith, John, .... Trotwood 
Smith, S. Z., . . Painter Creek 

Snell, Samuel, Unioa 

Snider, G. A Harrod 

Snyder, David, . . . Ashland 
Snyder, B. F., . Bellefontaine 
Sollenberger, D. P., . Fidelity 

Spacht, J. R New Stark 

Sprankel, Samuel, . Massillon. 
Stephens, Rezin, 

West Manchester 

Stover, John M., . . Bradford 
Stuckey, Simon B., . . . Paris 
Studebaker, Isaac S., Casstown. 

Stump, George C Baker 

Stutsman, D. C, 3843 Eastern 

Ave., Station C, . Cincinnati 
Stutsman, Jesse, . . Pitsburg 
Swinger, William, . Trotwood 
Teeter. W. C, 

... 17 Horace St., Dayton 
Thomas, D. D., Williamstown 

Titler, Geo., Dupont 

Tyson, Geo., . West Millgrove 

Walker, S. A Bloomville 

Wampler, D. J., . Taylorsburg 
Wampler, Daniel, Taylorsburg" 
Weidiiian, Silas, . . . Burbank 
Weinier, F. B., . . . . Sterling- 
Weirich, Jacob, . . Osnaburg 
Weller, Delphos, North Creek 

West, Landon Lanier 

Whisler, Sam'l, North Liberty 
Wieand, T. C, . Madisonburg: 
Wilkins, C. L., . . . . Greltoa 
Williams, Oliver, . . . Hedges 

Wine, D. D Covingtoa 

Wise, David, ..... Watsort 
Witmore, J. C, . . . Longley 
Woods, Charles M., . Spencer 
Workman, Wm, . Loudonville 



40 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



Workman, J. T Jelloway 

Workman, James, . . . Rolla 
Workman, C. J., Buckeye City 
Workman, S. J., . Ankenytown 
Workman, A. S., . Loudonville 
Worst, David, . . . Lattasburg 
Yoder, John, Jr., . Millersburg 
Young, David, . . . Mogadore 
Young, H. S New Berlin 

Oklahoma. 

Appleman, Jacob, . . Clarkson 

Austin, A. W Gushing 

Betts, Jacob, .... Handley 

Betts, I. F., Ingram 

Booze, H., . . . Round Grove 
Bosserman. Wm. P.. Karoma 

Brouse, W. P Ingram 

Brubaker, J. O Acton 

Brubaker, W. R Acton 

Brubaker, J. H Tryon 

Brubaker, N. F., . . Concord 

Cloyd, , Cherokee 

Diller, Aaron Moran 

Edgecomb, Samuel, . . Plumb 

Fillmore, A. G Gushing 

Porney, Isaac Wellston 

Gentry, Geo.T., Independence 

Glick, Joseph Hoyle 

Gordon, Daniel, Round Grove 

Gorham. A. L Clarkson 

'Gripe, N. S., . . . . . Thomas 

Harter, A. L., Carrier 

Henricks, Zaccheus, . . Hoyle 

Holler, John Valley 

iandis, F. B., Acton 

I^andis. G. W Acton 

Masterson, Jos. S., . Tonkawa 

Neher,J. G Stroud 

Neher, Ananias, . . . Clarkson 

Pitzer, John R Gordell 

Redmon, S. S., . . Davenport 
Root, Jos. A., . . . Wildwood 

Sanders, A. W., Perry 

Shower, R. B., . . . . Gushing 

Smith, Wm Hoyle 

Smith, Emmanuel J., . . Lynn 

Stouder, Jas. A., . . . Guthrie 

1423 Grant Ave 

Troxel, Henry Burnett 

Oregon. 

Bahr, Jacob Damascus 

Baltimore, A. H Spicer 

Barklovv, Thos., . Myrtlepoint 
Barklow, Ghas. H., Myrtlepoint 

Bashor, M.M Macleay 

Bonewitz, John, . . . Norway 
Brower. David, .... Talent 

Brower, D. M Ashland 

Carl, Geo. C., . . Myrtlepoint 
Decker, Sam'l E., Myrtlepoint 

Ebersole, J.F Salem 

Eby, S. M Jacksonville 

Eshelman, M. M., . . . Salem 

Hoxie, G. W Williams 

Hulse, F. M Ashland 

Moomaw, J. T., . . Eaglepoint 
Nininger, G. E., . . . Ashland 

Royer, Josiah A Isabel 

Shuck, S. A Merrill 



VanDyke, S. P Norway 

Workman. Philip, . . . Mabel 

Pennsylvania. 

Allison, David 

Lees Crossroads 

Anthony, Wm, A., Shady Grove 
Babylon, E., . . Menges Mills 
Baker, D. M., . . Waynesboro 

Baker, J. S Everett 

Baker Ghas. L., . East Berlin 
Baker, David H., Abbottstown 
Barnthouse, Jasper, .... 

Markleysburg 

Bashor, And., . Oakland Mills 
Beasor, John R., . . Barbara 
Baugher, Geo. M., . Brodbecks 
Baugher, Aaron, . . . Codorus 
Beam, Joseph, .... Ligonier 
Beaver, S. S., . McAlisterville 
Beaver, John L., . Mifflinburg 
Beaver, Isaiah, Lochiel Union 
Becker, G. S., . . . . Deodate 

Beeghly, S. A Coalport 

Beelman, Henry, . . Dillsburg 

Beer, J. H., Rockton 

Beery, Ghas. O., . . . Elderton 
Bennett, John, .... Artemas 
Berkey, Joseph, . . . Hillsboro 
Berkley, Josiah, .... Glade 
Berkley, Albert, . . Johnstown 
Berkley, Norman, 

W. Johnstown 

Blough, J. W., . . Hooversville 
Blough, P. J., . . Hooversville 
Blough, J. E., .... Geistown 

Blough, W. W Berlin 

Blough, J. M., . Stantons Mill 
Blough, E. J., . . Stantons Mill 

Blough, S. S Johnstown 

Bomberger, Gyrus, . Lebanon 

Bond, Wm White 

Book, Isaac Warble 

Book, Edmund Blain 

Booz. Jacob, . . , Salfordville 

Bottorff, Jerry Odell 

Bowser, John, . . . Tatesville 

Brallier, D. S 

2137th St., Altoona 

Braucher, Urias D., . Somerset 

Brilhart, D Loganville 

Brindle, Gyrus, . . Huntsdale 
Brough, John, . . East Berlin 
Brown, Peter, . . East Berlin 
Brown, Jacob K.. . Woodbury 
Brubaker, Christian, Neffsville 
Brubaker, W. U., . . Rockton 
Brumbaugh, M. G 

Huntingdon 

Brumbaugh, Irvin B 

James Greek 

Brumbaugh, Reuben H., . . 

James Greek 

Brumbaugh, J. B., 

Huntingdon 

Brumbaugh, H. B., .... 

Huntingdon 

Brumbaugh, John H., Barbara 
Brumbaugh, Geo., . . Grafton 
Brumbaugh, John, . . Grafton 
Brumbaugh, James D., . . . 

Martinsburg 

Brumbaugh, G. B., 

James Greek 



Brumbaugh, J. B., . . Bellwood 

Brumbaugh, G. W 

Clovercreek 

Bucher, G., . Mechanic Grove 

Bucher, Christian, 

Schaefferstown 

Buck, G. L., . New Enterprise 
Burget. A. B., . . Clovercreek 
Burkhart, Jos. S., . Johnstown 
Cassel, F. P., • • • • Lansdale 
Gassel, Isaac, Fairview Village 
Charles, Warren, . . Grampian 
Christner, A. D., Mt. Pleasant 
Christner, Amos, . . Gebhart 
Claar, Michael, . . Claysburg 
Claar, J. C, ..... . Queen 

Claar, Abram J Queen 

Clapper, D. S Everett 

Clark, E. F., . 

. . 134 W. Long St., Dubois 
Cleaver, Geo., . . Curwensville 
Gline, Joseph W., 26th St. & 

. Lenigh Ave., Philadelphia 
Connor, Jacob, . Graters Ford 
Cook, Hezekiah, . . Dillsburg 
Cover. Samuel C .' 

. 4747 Liberty St., Pittsburg 
Cox, Samuel M., . . . . Kipple 
Crissman, John, . . . Hortons 
Crouthamel, Hillery, .... 

Line Lexington 

Darf, JohnJ., Gideon 

Davis, J. N Tub 

Deardorff, JohnD. W 

Gettysburg 

Debolt, Alpheus, . Masontown 
Detweiler, D. T., . Salemville 

Dietz, J.F Johnstown 

Dively, Fred. C, . . Claysburg 
Dorer, Solomon, . . Johnstown 
Eby, Isaac, . New Germantown 
Eby, Benjamin Z., . Manheim 
Eby, Josiah, New Germantown 
Ecker, D. R., . Walnut Bottom 
Eicher, John K., . Kecksburg 
Eisenberg, J. Y., East Coventry 
Ellis, C.G Philadelphia 

2250 N. Carlisle St 

Emerick, I,sarel, . Strinestown 
Eshelman, Daniel M., . Florin 
Etter, Henry, .... Beautiful 
Fahnestock, Nathan, Manheim 
Falkenstein, George N., . . 

661 1 Germantown Ave., Phila 
Faust, Jeremiah, . Jones Mills 

Ferguson, I. B., Bills 

Flohr, J. R., . . Fountaindale 

Fluck, J. B Loysburg 

Fogelsanger, J. R 

Middle Spring 

Forney, Milton G 

...... East Petersburg 

Foust, David A., . Williamson 

Francis, Jay G Oaks 

Fretz. William, . . . Hatfield 
Fyock, Abram, . . Johnstown 
Fyock, J. W., . Purchase Line 
Garland, John G 

Pleasantridge 

Garner, J. D., . . . . Beautiful 

Garver.JohnE Cora 

Gaunt, W. A Elklick 

Gibble, Gyrus R., Brunnersville 
Gibble, Hiram, . . . Manheim 



Ginrich, A. B,, . . . . Font 
Gnagey, Joel, . . . Meyersc 

Gotwalls, Jacob Z O 

Gochenour, E., . . . Bigmo 
Grater, A. L., . . . Royersf 

Graybill, Israel P 

Graybill, Reuben, . . Manh 
Gray, S. S., . . . Shirleysb 
Groff, Hershey, . . . Barev 
Hackman, Jacob, . . .Diss 
Haines, Amos H., Hunting! 
Hanawalt, George, . . Bouc 
Hanawalt, W. G 

DerryStal 

Harlacher. J. A., . East Be 
Harshbarger, John, Johnst( 
Harrison, John C, . . . Vi 
Hege, George, . . William 
Heiple, Theo., .... Bouc 
Heisy, Martin, . . . Corn\ 
Herr, John, .... Myerstc 
Herr, Tobias, . . . Millers\ 
Hershberger, J. S., . . Evei 
Hershberger, Solomon, . . 

Valley I 

Hertzler, John, .... Bet 
Hertzler, S. H., Elizabethtc 
Hetrick, J. P., . East Coven 
Hetrick. David A.. Kellersb 
Hildebrand, D., . Conemai 
Hochstettler,H. P., . Rumi 
Hostetler, E. K., . Pocohor 
Hohf, D. B., . Smiths Stat 
Holderman, M., . . Pinegr 
Hollinger, A. K., Shippensb 
Hollinger, Jacob, Greenspr 
Hollinger, Henry, . . Font; 
Hollinger, A. M., . Moored 
Hollinger, Adam, .... A) 
Holsinger, J. L., 

Bakers Sum 

Holsinger, L. F., . . Waters 
Holsopple, Ira C, . . Indi 
Holsopple, Jacob, . . Geist( 
Holsopple, Joseph, . . Indi 
Holsopple, F. F., . Parkerl 

Hoover, Silas, I 

Hoover, O. P., . . Hunting 
Horner, D. D., . . Jones ft' 
Hosfeld, C. F., . Shippensb 
Hottenstein, Amos, . . . 

EastPeterst 

Howe, W. M , . . Norristi 

1030 W. Air 

Hull, Abraham, ... 

Hull, R. T Bakers 

Huttle, Benj., Pa 

Imler, T. F 

307 W. Lemon St., Lanca 
Johnson, Isaiah C., Meyers 
Just, Cyrus A., . . Rockv 
Kauffman, S., . Oakland T 

Keller, LB Lin 

Kilhefner, David K., . Eph 
Kimmel, Lewis, . . . Elde 
Kittinger, B. F., . . . An 

Kline, Daniel R B< 

Knave), Peter, . . Scalp I 
Knisely, C. S., . . Valley 

Knisley, Geo Tatej 

Koontz, Jacob, . . . Loys 
Koontz, Wm., . . Shadyg 



Brethre7is Family Almanac. 



41 



penhaver, Wm., Mt. Carmel 
Ip, Isaac. . . Graters Ford 
tz. Daniel, . De Turksville 
ce, Daniel B., Harrisonville 
idis, Daniel. Bowmansdale 
idis, Elias, • • • • Richfield 
le, James R.!^ . Shirleysburg 
Ltherman, E. K., . Fairfield 
ever, Elias B., . . Ephrata 

inian, James P., 

;8 W. Philadelphia St., Yox\. 
iman, Hiram, . . Geistown 

mer, John, Upton 

mier, G. G., Mechanicsburg 

ht, H. E Mountville 

t, C. G Meyersdale 

ig, Walter S., . ...Tyrone 
ig,J. A 

. .800W. Locust St., York 
ig, OrvilleV., Abbottstown 
iganecker, J. H., .Palmyra 
idock, D., Roaring Spring 
ddocks, T. B., Clovercreek 
deria, Chas., . Milton Grove 
tile, Edward, . . . Fryburg 
ust, S. P., . - . Meyersdale 
llott, Absalom, .... Gem 

jrers, J. T Oaks 

yers, Samuel, . . . Codorus 
ler, William. . . . Lisburn 
ler, Daniel. . Mercersburg 
ler, Howard, . . Lewisburg 
ler, B. W., .... Advance 

ler, S. G., Bolivar 

ler, George H., . . . Point 
ler, John B., . . New Paris 

ler, Alfred, Carroll 

ler, P. U Brotherton 

ler, John A., . . . Oakville 
ler, E. S., . . . . Blackrock 
ler, J. Kurtz, . . Kauffman 
ler, J. B., . . . Woodbury 
iler, John M., . Harrisburg 
iler, Levi S., . . Dillsburg 
mmert, M., . Menges Mills 
rray, Fred., . . Champion 
rphy, M. L., . McVeytown 
sseiman, H., . Scalp Level 
3ser, Samuel, . McVeytown 
vc, John W., . . Lancaster 

526 W. Lemon St 

jrs, J. Allen, . McVeytown 
irs, S. B., .... Graydon 
jrs, R. T., . . McVeytown 
irs, J. W., . Fredericksburg 

;rs, C. E Tarrs 

jrs, H. S Pennsville 

;rs, Ananias, . . Johnstown 
;rs, Jacob M., . . Graydon 

irs, John, Lincoln 

ers. T. T Upland 

;rs, Andrew 

;5 W. Philadelphia St., York 
2rs, Christian, . . . Warble 
srs, G. S., New Enterprise 

srs, S. F„ Altoona 

ers, Joseph, . Mt. Pleasant 
Irow, R. A., . . Jones Mills 
s, Christian, . . . Graydon 
vcomer, J. S., . Mountville 
sly, Jacob, .... Richland 
irholtzer, W. H.,Myerstown 



Oellig, C. R., . . Waynesboro 
Patterson, Geo., . Berwinsdale 
Peck, J. W., . . . Meyersdale 

Peck, L. A Savage 

Pfautz, J. K., . . Farmersville 
Pfoutz, A., . . Crosskill Mills 

Pfoutz, C. L Knoxlyn 

Pollard, R. T., . . . . Garrett 

Price, J. M Harleysville 

Price, J. H., . . Richlandtown 
Price, Henry A., . Harleysville 
PuUen, Wm. H., . Parkerford 
Rearii, James F., . .Geistown 
Reber, Jno. G., . . Centerport 

Reed, Samuel Progress 

Reese, A. W Scranton 

Reidenbach, R. S., . Hinkleton 
Replogle, J. B., . . Woodbury 
Replogle, H. S., . . Waterside 
Richard, Jacob H., . Maitland 
Riddlesberger, Isaac, . Quincy 

Ritchey, W. S Foreman 

Ritchey, Saml., . Yellowcreek 

Ritter, H. H Kregar 

Rodgers, Levi, Ryot 

Royer, Henry D., . . Lincoln 
Royer, Abram H., . Talmage 

Rupert, S. G Lancaster 

316 E. New St 

Rush, John S Tatesville 

Ruthrauff, J. B., . Waynesboro 
Schlosser, John, . . Schoeneck 
Sell, James A., . . McKee Gap 

Sell, Brice Newry 

Sell, David, Newry 

Shaffer, D. D., . . Scalp Level 

Shaffer, J. J Kenilworth 

Shellenberger, J. B 

Bannerville 

Shisler, James B., Harleysville 
Shively, G. W., . . . Kossuth 
Shively, Green, . Whitesprings 
Shober, Samuel U., . Somerset 
Shope, Adam J., . Harrisburg 
Shope, David F., . . . Saltillo 
Showalter, Simon, . Richfield 
Shrock. W. G., . . Brotherton 
Shroyer, Daniel, , . . Carroll 
Simmons, Alonzo L., . Everett 
Smith, David, . Union Deposit 
Smith, Jacob O., . . . -Swales 
Snider, Jacob. . . Waynesboro 
Snowberger, J. S 

Williamsburg 

Snader, David, Akron 

Sonon, H. S., East Petersburg 
Spanogle, Andrew, Lewistown 
Spanogle, H. A., . Harrisburg 

Speicher, Jacob, Bills 

Spicher, John W., . . Hillsdale 

Spicher, M. H., Ord 

Stahl,H. A Glade 

Stayer, D. H., . . . Tatesville 

Stayer, J. C Woodbury 

Stayer, J. R., . RoaringSpring 
Stamy, J. F., . Lees Crossroads 
Steinberger, Albert, Lewistown 

Stoner, Levi Mammoth 

Stouffer, S. M., . Greenspring 

Strawser, Geo Oriental 

Strickler. D. H., . . Vicksburg 



Stuckey, L. T 

New Enterprise 

Summy, Abraham,! Kecksburg 

Swab, John Valley 

Swigart, M. C, . McVeytown 
Swigart, S. J., . . . Lewistown 
Swigart, W. J., . . Huntingdon 
Swigart, G. H., . . McVeytown 
Swigart, J. C, . Strodes Mills 
Taylor, L W., . . Vogansville 
Taylor, S.W., . Springgrove 
Thomas, Michael, . Somerfield 
Thomas, Wm., Gibbons Glade 
Trimmer, Peter, . . Mulberry 
Umbel, Samuel, Markleysburg 
Vanhorn, Daniel M., Foreman 
Wakefield, R. W.,Shirleysburg 
Wakefield, R. M., . . Rockhill 

Walker, Daniel H Lull 

Walker, Ira D. S Lull 

Wegley, J. W., . . . Somerset 
Weily, Wm., . . Franklintown 
Weller, M.J., . . Markleysburg 
Wenger, Israel, .... Lincoln 
Wenger, Ed., . Fredericksburg 

Weyand, Michael Lull 

Widdowson, James, Dixonville 
Wiley, Wm., .... Dillsburg 

Wilt, J. W., Altoona 

Winand, Geo., . York Springs 
Wineman, D. B., . . . . . . 

Upper Strasburg 

Winey, C. G., . . . East Salem 
Witmer, Samuel Z., . . . . 

Elizabethtown 

Witmer, John H., Hanoverdale 

Wood, C. A., Haynie 

Ziegler, D. P., . . . Mt. .Etna 
Ziegler, Jesse C, . Royersford 
Zimmerman,J.S.,Hooversville 
Zimmerman, W. B., . Walnut 
Zimmerman, S.. . Davidsville 
Zuck, D. M.. . . Mercersburg 
Zug, S. R., . . Mastersonville 
Zug, H. S., . . Mastersonville 

South Carolina. 

Jones, S. P., . . . . Brooklyn 

South Dakota. 

Horning, W. W., . . Frederick 
Horning, S. H., . . . Frederick 
Mansfield, Morgan, . Frederick 

Tennessee. 

Allen, H. C Snowflake 

Anderson, George, . Snowflake 
Argabright, J. H., . Dry Creek 
Baker, David, South Wautauga 

Bantz, CM Lankford 

Bashor, JohnC, . . Jonesboro 
Bashor, Conrad, . . Jonesboro 
Bowman, Joseph . . Jonesboro 

Bowman, Daniel F 

Johnson City 

Bowman, Samuel, . Flourville 
Bowman, John P., . Jonesboro 
Brown, Wm.F,, . . Jonesboro 
Brubaker. John, . . Morelock 
Christner, N. B., . . Leesburg 
Clark, Jesse, .... Jonesboro 
Clark, Wm., . . Johnson City 



Correll, P. M Morelock 

Davis, Cha?., . Lawrenceburg 

Davis, D. C Trade 

Derrick, Marvel, . . Snowflake 

Diehl, C. H Jonesboro 

Diehl, D. A Jonesboro 

Duncan, A. H., . McMinnville 
Garber, S. H., . . . Jonesboro 

Garber, S. D Morelock 

Garst, J.H., .... Blountville 
Garst, Noah N., . . Blountville 

Gilbert, Greenberg, 

New Canton 

Gray, E. D., .... Limestone 
Hawke, Martin R., . Childress 
Hilbert, John B., . . Jonesboro 
Hinkle, James, . Johnson City 
Hodge, Josiah, . . . Pineyflats 
Isenburg, W. D., . Gillenwater 
Klepper, Peter, . . . Alumwell 
Larimere, John, . Whites Store 

Ledhetter, . . Butterfly 

Lehman, J. B., . . . Crowson 
Lilly, Thomas, . Johnson City 
Lilly, Andrew J., . . . Lawson 
Lovegrove, J. W . . Jonesboro 
McKeehan, E. K., . Jonesboro 
Miller, Peter, .... Jonesboro 
Molsbee, J. O., . . Gillenwater 
Murray, Jacob A., . . Warren 
Murray, John, . . Bean Station 
Nead, A. E., . . . . . Matuta 

Nead, M Matuta 

Oren, A. W., . . . . Lankford 

Pence, J. B Limestone 

Pence, George F., . Limestone 
Reed, Peter D., . . Limestone 

Satterfield,;. R Paul 

Sherfy, N. B Blountville 

Sizemore, Jos. I., . . War Gap 
Smith, W. S., . . Edens Ridge 
Vines, AndrewJ., . Jonesboro 

Williford, Wm Kansas 

Wine, Joseph, . . .Blountville 
Wine. Jacob, .... Oakgrove 

Texas. 

Elliott, J. M Houston 

Gish, R. G Deer Park 

Kidwell, E. M., . . . Decatur 

Miller, J. A Manvel 

Molsbee, Abraham, . . Nocona 

Neher, J. F., Saginaw 

Peters, Morton, .... Manvel 

Stump, John, Miami 

Tennison, K. G., Weatherford 
Vaniman, A. W., . . . Sag^inaw 

Virginia. 

Akers,Dr. R.T., . . Alumridge 
Akers, Washington, Carthage 

Angle, Lee, Wirtz 

Baker, D Stephens City 

Barnhart, A Wirtz 

Barnhart, J.W Wirtz 

Barnhart, Jeremiah, . . Junta 

Barnhart. O Willis 

Beahm, Henry Lowry 

Beahm, I. N. H., . Brentsville 

Beahm. W. E Gillaspie 

Beahm, S. P.. . . Bedford City 
Beahm. J. C, . . . Brentsville 



42 



Brethreris Family Almatiac. 



Beverage, Josiah, . . Monterey 
Boon, John O., . . Waidsboro 
Boon, Samuel, . . . Corleyville 
Boothe, Noah, . . . Alumridge 
Bowman, S. I., . Harrisonburg 
Bowman, Peter, . . . Epperly 
Bowman, Daniel, Dillons Mills 

Bowman, Geo Junta 

Bowman, Isaac, .... Taccio 
Britton, Joseph F., Nokesville 
Brubaker, Louis E., . Hickman 
Brubaker. D. R., . . . . Salem 
Carroll, Geo., .... Bigtunnel 
Chambers, Andrew, . Midland 
Clanahan, John 

St. Davids Church 

Click, J. W Bridgewater 

Cline, Joseph M., . . Knightly 

Cline, John Longglade 

Cline, Samuel, . Stephens City 
Cofferman, N. Walter, . . . 

Barren Ridge 

Connor, Abram, . . Manassas 
Connor, W. K., . Bridgewater 
Crumpacker, Saml, . Bonsacks 
Cummings, James T., . . Naffs 
Deaton, J. F., . . . Cavespring 

Denton, T.C Daleville 

Dickerson, Moses, . . Epperly 
Dove, Addison, . . Dovesville 

Dove, Geo, L Criders 

Dove, J. A., ... . Cloverdale 
Driver, Sam'l, . Barren Ridge 
Driver, John F., . Timberville 
Driver, Casper, ,. Barren Ridge 
Early, H. C, . . . Montevideo 
Early, A. B., . . . New Hope 
Early, M. G., . . . Nokesville 

Elgin, William Charity 

Eller, C. E., Salem 

Eller, D. Newton, . . Daleville 
Fitzwater. S. W., . Dovesville 

♦Flora, Riley Hickman 

Flora, M. A., Helms 

Flory, George B., . Lipscomb 
Flory, George B., . . . Helms 

Flory, S. I Stuarts Draft 

Flory, D. C, . . . . Newhope 

Flory, S. H Nokesville 

Forrer, John, . . Stuarts Draft 
Foster, Joseph F., . . . Luray 
Fulk, George H., . . . Genoa 
Garber, Levi, . . . Mt, Sidney 
Garber, A. D., . . Mt. Sidney 
Garber, B. F., . . Timberville 
Garber, Jacob, . Greenmount 
Garber, Peter, . Weyers Cave 
Garber, Jacob C, Barrenridge 
Garber, John H., . New Market 

Glick, Jacob D. Lilly 

Good, M. J., . . . Mt. Jackson 
Graybill, George, Brughs Mill 
Graybill, Jonas, . Brughs Mill 

Grisso, Jacob Moomaw 

Hall, Wm. I Marysville 

Harman, Ananias, . Abraham 
Hays, Daniel, ... Broadway 
Hershberger, L A. B., . Vinton 
Holsinger, JohnS., Nokesville 
Huffman, J. B. F., . Rileysville 
Hylton.H.P Willis 



Hylton, Jacob, .... Hylton 

Hylton, Joseph, Pax 

Hylton, S. P Mira Fork 

Hylton, Austin Santos 

Hylton, A. N Willis 

Hylton, C. D Daleville 

Ikenberry, Samuel M., . Helms 
Ikenberry, Henry, . . . Wirtz 
Ikenberry, L. D., . . Daleville 
Ikenberry, J. W., . . Daleville 
Jamison, Geo. M., . . . Arritts 
Jamison, John. . . Potts Creek 

John, J. J., Daleville 

Kagey, Jos. M .Dayton 

Kagey. A.J., . . Mt. Jackson 
Keith, Jacob F., . . Campcreek 

Keith, Z Santos 

Kendig, E. D., . Stuarts Draft 
Kendig, J. R., . Stuarts Draft 
Kirakofe, B. A., . . . . Stover 
Kline, M. B. E., . . Broadway 
Kline, John H., Cowans Depot 
Kline, J. Sam'l, . . .Broadway 
Lackey, W. C, . . . .Charity 
Layman, J. T., . . . Daleville 
Leedy, John H., . Toms Brook 
Leftwich, J. P. . . . Gillaspie 

Lewis, J. G Medina 

Long, Em Bridgewater 

Long, Isaac S., . . Goods Mills 

May, Siram Dovesville 

Miller, J. Carson, Bridgewater 
Miller, Isaac A., .... Stover 
Miller, B. B., . . Greenmount 

Miller, P. S Roanoke 

Miller, John A., . Bridgewater 
Miller, A. L., . . . . Ottobine 
Miller, Daniel, . Weyers Cave 
Miller, Joseph M., . . Ottobine 
Miller, Joseph A., . Sangerville 
Miller, Anthony A., . ... 

Bolar Spring 

Miller, Benj., . . Greenmount 
Miller, Samuel T., . Stonewall 

Miller. S. D Mt. Sidney 

Miller, Hiram G., Bridgewater 
Montgomery, Benj.,Eaglerock 
Montgomery, Chas. S., Helms 
Montgomery, Abraham S.. . 

. Helms 

Moomaw, B. F., . . Bonsacks 
Moomaw, Kenton B., . . . . 

Indianrock 

Mowry, HughR., . Saumsville 

Moyer, H., Dovesville 

Myers, Isaac C, . Greenmount 

Naff, D. C, Salem 

Naff, Benjamin T., . Hernando 

Naff, Daniel Naffs 

Naff, W. H Epperly 

Naff, John, Salem 

Neff, Isaac M., . . Forestville 

Neff, B. W Mt. Jackson 

Nezzelrodt, Chas., 

. Shenandoah Alum Springs 

Painter, Geo. W Koontz 

Pence, J., Meyerhoeffers Store 

Peters, Daniel, Helms 

Peters, Riley L., . . . . Helms 
Peters, Wm., Seven Fountains 
Petry, Samuel, . . Goods Mills 
Phillips, Geo. A., . Hermitage 



Powel, E. M Chestnut 

Puffenbarger, G. M.. . Doehill 
Pursley, A. F., . . . Buchanan 
Parsley, W. T., Saltpeter Cave 
Racer, John A., . . . Kimball 
Reed, Isaac, .... Alumridge 
Reed, Henry, . . . Alumridge 

Reed, Noah Alumridge 

Reed, Samuel P., . Alumridge 
Reed, Wyatt, . . . Alumridge 

Richard, A Woodstock 

Roller, J. Samuel, New Market 
Rothgeb, Mart., Massanutton 
Ryman, John L., . Saumsville 
Sanger, S. F., . . . Manassas 
Sanger, S. A., . . . Scottsford 
Sanger, Martin G., Sangerville 
Sergeon, Stephen, . Jonesville 
Shaver, S. A., . . Maurertown 
Shaver, Isaac, . . . Copperhill 
Shickel, Jos., .... Roanoke 
Showalter, P. H., . . Scottsford 
Smith, T.M.,. . . Wolf Glade 
Sours, H. F., . . . . . Long 
Spangler, S. G., . Floyd C. H. 
Spangler, John, . . Huffville 

Spitler, D. N Long 

Strickler, Walter, . . . Luray 

Strole, M. L Honeyville 

Thomas, Jacob, . Springcreek 
Thomas, Abram, Springcreek 
Thomas, P. S., . Harrisonburg 

Tow, William Cana 

Turner, Daniel, . Cootes Store 

Varner, W^m., Doehill 

Wakeman. J. W., . Harrisville 
Wampler, Joseph W., . Edom 
Wayland, J. W., . Bridgewater 
Weddle, Harvey, . . . Topeco 
Weddle, Joel, . . Burks Fork 
Weddle, Andrew J., . .Santos 
Weimer, Dennis, . . . Bealton 
Wenger, Levi A., . Mt. Sidney 
Whitmer, David, . . Buckhall 

Wickham, L. D. Pilot 

Williams, C. A Salem 

Wine, Geo. W., .' . . Ottobine 
Wine, J. W., .... Ottobine 
Wine, D. P., . . Moores Store 
Wine, W. M., . . Winchester 
Wood, T. C, Whittles Station 
Wood, Chas. H., . . Snowden 

Woods, M.F Willis 

Wright. A. T Deerfield 

Yankey, F. A., .... Criders 
Yount, W. B., . . Bridgewater 
Zigler, Samuel, . . . Mayland 
Zigler, Samuel D.. . .Mayland 
Zigler, John P., . . . Mayland 

Zigler, D. C Stover 

Zigler, D. H Mayland 

Zimmerman, Jacob, Mt. Solon 

Washington. 

Andrews, M. E., . Oysterville 

Click, Daniel M Tekoa 

Eby, D. B Sunnyside 

Miller, S. H., . . . Sunnyside 

Stiverson, J. U. G Fulda 

Wood, W. F Lyle 



West Virginia. 

Abernathy, I. W Wilso 

Abernathy, J. W Wilso 

Annon, Zechariah, . Thornto 

Annon, G. W Thornto 

Arnold, John A Eglo 

Arnold, D. B Burlingto 

Arnold, G.S Burlingto 

Arnold, Peter, . . . Burlingto 

Arnold, Albert S Eglo 

Arnold, A. W., . . Purgitsvill 
Arnold, D. E., . . Purgitsvill 
Baker, Raphael, . . . Bayar 

Baker, John K Antiod 

Ball, John M Thornto; 

Barnes, F Brandonvill 

Barnes, John, Soh 

Beery. Jacob D August 

Beverage, Levi, . . Cloverlic 
Biser, Solomon, . . Burlingtoi 
Bond, Thomas. . Frenchcreei 
Bosely, David, . . . Bulltowi 
Bowers, Philander, . Franklii 
Bricker, G. W., . . Darkesvill 
Brindle, John, . . Martinsburi 

Caldwell, L. D Mathiai 

Clark, Dennis, . . Maysvilli 
Claypool. H. S., Saltlick Bridg 

Click, J, A Burlingtoi 

Cochran, Martin, . . Tollgat 

Collins, Benj Greenbanl 

Cook, A. L Seemb 

Cosner, J. T Bismarci 

Cosner, Wm. H., . . . Wilsoi 

Crouse, J. M Qakhil 

Czigans, Milton, .... Grov( 

Dickson, H Franklii 

Duncan, A.J Gatewooc 

Duncan, A. B .Oakhil 

Ebert, Otis Greenlanc 

Evans, Alex., . . Fayetteville 
Everts, J. D., . Wilsons Milh 

Fike, EmraT., Eglor 

Fike, JohnS., Eglor 

Fike, Tobias S., . . Brooksid< 
Fike, Moses, ...... Eglor 

Fike, Aaron, Eglor 

Fike, Jonas, Eglor 

Fike, S. A Egloi 

Fisher, Perry A., . St. Albans 
Fleming, Jas. W., FurTgitsville 
Fleshman, L. A., . . Lindsidf 
Flory, N. B., . . PleasantdaU 
Frantz, J.C., . . . LanreldaU 
Frantz, Abram, . . . Dawsor 
Friedly, John, . . . Gooseneck 
George, T. Ezra, . . . Antiocl: 

George, Wm Martir 

Glen, John, . . . Wardensvillc 
Groves, CM...... Overhili 

Guthrie, Joseph, . . Hazelton 
Hamstead, Obed, . . . Eglon 
Hieshman, Geo., Wardensvillc 
Hinegardner, B. D., .... 

Lost River 

Hockman, John, Pleasantdale 
Holsberry, J. K., . Nestorville 
Hovatter, John, . . . Hovatter 
Hutchinson, Geo. . . Lindside 
Hutchinson, Andrew, Bluefield 
Jamieson, B. F Copen 



Brethreris Family Almanac 



45 



, H. N., . . . Burlington 
3. W., . . . . . Colfax 
jrman, J. B. . Burlington 
!rman,J.M., Purgitsville 
;rman, Geo. W., Keyser 
irman, J. N., Purgitsville 
d, Elias L., . Bulltown 

,s, S Lost River 

ly, E. W Onego 

ion, John Alton 

David J Overhill 

Thos. H Overhill 

Lorenzo H., Lost River 

J. M Eglon 

DwenC Duffy 

Moses, .... Mathias 



Murphy, Wm. R., . . Bulltown 
Murphy, Geo. E., . . Bulltown 

Nicola, C. G Nicklow 

Nine, W. F,, . . . . Gormania 

Parish, J. A Copeton 

Pence, Daniel Ivy 

Phillips, Wm. B., . . . Texas 
Poling, Godfrey J., . . Kasson 

Pope, J. W Moorefield 

Puffenbarger, A., . Sugargrove 
Reed, Ross E., . Morgantown 
Richardson, J., . Meadowbluff 

Riggleman, W. L Kuley 

Riggleman, John, . Bluespring 

Riner, Samuel Oakhill 

Riner, J. A., . . . . . Oakhill 



Rotruck, W. D Antioch 

Sattertield, B. F Mayton 

Shahan, George, . Hannahville 
Shafer.W. H., Valley Furnace 
Smith. B. W., . . Barnes Mills 
Snuffer, Matthew P., . Beckley 
Starkey, J. H., . . Griffithsville 
Stearman, Chas. H., . Overhill 
Teats, L. W., 



Thomas, Jer., . 

Tilsman, A. L., 

Utz,J.H., . . 

Weimer, Israel 

Wells, J. M., . 

Wilfong, Benjamin, . . Edray 

Wilt, Lloyd., . Bentons Ferry 



. Lost River 
Clifton Mills 
. . Lindside 
Martinsburg 
. Hopeville 
Kalamazoo 



Wilmoth, William 

Top of Alleghany 

Wilson, Josiah, . . . Belington 
Wilson, James, . . . Wilmoth 

Wisconsin. 

Baker, H. C East Pepin 

Baker, Samuel H., . Ludington 

Bowman, Eli Spooner 

Crist, Samuel . . Menomonee 

Joyce, E. E., Barron 

Patten, John Stanley 

Salsbury, C. L., . Prairie Farm 
Shepherd, John, . . Ashridge 
Stark, G. H. Phillips 



rwenty= Fifth Thousand on 
...the Market... 

pel Songs and Hymns Ko. 1 

brethren's New Song Book for Sunday Schools, 
Prayer Meetings, Social Meetings, and 
General Song Service. 



BY GEO. B. HOLSINGER. 



s rich in melodies, expressive in words, and deeply de- 
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; book contains about 208 pages, is bound in boards and 
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circulars, showing testimonials. 



...SOLt) ONLY BY... 



eOLORADO SALVIA GO., 



Rockford, Illinois. 



.Affirmative Only. 



The Doctrine of the Brethren 
Defended. 



The author, Elder Robert Miller, was in his day the ablest 
defender of the faith. Doctrine of the Brethren Defended con- 
tains the best arguments of his mature years, and is invaluable 
to any one wishing to know the tenets of the faith. 

The author published both affirmative and negative argna- 
ments, but the present edition has only the affirmative ones. 

Well bound in cloth, 298 pages, good, clear print. Price, 75 
cents. Address: 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
22 and 24 S. State St. Elgin, HHmis. 



44 



Brethreris Family Almanac. 



Dr. Lehman- s 
Stock Powder 




is a blood purifier, nerve tonic 
and appetizer. It will aid diges- 
tion, arouse the action of the liver and kidneys, and cleanses the 
blood. Therefore it should be fed in the spring before horses be- 
gin work, as well as at all other times, when stock needs a tonic and 
blood purifier. It will cure rough coat, swelled legs, hide bound, 
poor appetite and skin disease. It will help cows not doing well 
after calving, etc. It contains no cheap filler, but is pure medicine, 
and doses are small, therefore it is an economical stock medicine 
and should be used whenever a condition powder is indicated for 
horses, cattle, sheep and hogs. 

Dr. Lehman's Poultry Vitalizer 

Is a powder especially prepared for poultry. It invigorates and 
makes hens lay, and cures and prevents disease. No hen can lay if 
not in a healthy condition. This, and winter laying is promoted by 
feeding Dr. L,eliman's Poultry Vitalizer. Having years of 
experience in raising poultry and being a veterinarian I feel con- 
fident that I am offering the public a poultry powder that will 
give good results. 



Price of Stock Powder and Poultry Vitalizer, 30 cents 
per packag:e, postpaid, or $3,O0 per dozen. Special rates 
to agents. 

H. H. LEHMAN, 
Veterinary Surgeon. Lattasburg, Ohio. 



CAP GOODS. 



By the kind patronage of thousands of sisters my 
business has become the largest of the kind in the 
United States, covering thirty-five of the States. 
Largest line! Lowest prices! Samples Free. 

B. L. CARTER, 

Girard, III. 

...FENCE... 



Before you build your next fence we would be 
pleased to have you write us for circulars givmg 
full particulars about our fence, gates, and manner 
of doing business. Write us; we may have what 
you want. 

The Big Wonder Fence Co., 

Plymoutlv, - Indiana. 



STOP 

Chewing... 

...AND... 

...Smoking 

TOBACCO! 



Hindoo 
Tobacco 
Habit 
ra^r Cure! 




Perfectly harmless— never fails. Free sample and full 
particulars sent postpaid on application. 



MILFORD DRUG CO., 



MILFORD, 



I took a box of your Hindoo six months ago and it saved 
have not taken a chew since. Before I took the cure I usedioo 
worth of tobacco a day.— .^. C. Colwell, Lone Tree, Iowa, . 
6, i8Qg. 

Your Hindoo remedy is worth its weight in gold.— A/r. P 
Shively, Wapecong, Ind., Feb. 27, i8qq. 

I am glad to tell you your Hindoo remedy has cured ray i 
band of the tobacco habit. He had tried other remedies but 1 
were failures. He is also restored to good health; I feel than 
to my Heavenly Father for the cure.— /l/rj. /. /. Wright, Aj 
noose, Kans.,Jitne 30, i8qq. 

Your Hindoo remedy is without doubt the best cure for 
tobacco habit, and surely merits all the praise it gets.— C \ 
ter Eshelman, Ottawa, Kans., April, 4, i8qq. 



We are Receiving Testimonials like the above Every Da. 

J. J. ELLIS & CO., 

COMMISSION MERCHAN'i 

Grain, Hay, Seeds and General 
Country Produce. 

305 S. Charles St., BALTIMORE, IVI 



\ . i 



The Quaker Folding Vapor Bath Cabinet. 



326,000 sold. Every home should have one for batb 
1 ing purposes. It opens the millions of pores, forces out th 
} poisons which cause disease. Make 

"~ you clean, vigorous and healthy 

Prevents disease. Provides Turkish 
hot air and medicated baths at home fo 
3 cents each. Beautifies the complex 
ion. Recommended by best pnysi 
cians. Without drugs It cures ba< 
colds, rheumatism, la grippe, neural 
gia, obesity, female ills, and all blood 
1 Hi \\ ^HH skin, nerve and kidney troubles 
3 OHn^^l ^^1 ^^^ "^^^ ^^°° ^^y^^ h^^ ^ door, a sell 
supporting frame, best material, rub 
ber lined. Folds small. Weight 5 lbs 
Price, all complete, with full directions 
only SS-oo express prepaid. Orde 
to-day. Valuable book, testimoni 
als, etc., sent free. Agents wanted 

Lmen and women. $60 to $100 per month easily made 
Address: H. E. Newcomer, Lock Box 325, Mx. Morris, III 




Brethren's Family Almanac. 



45 



ONE POST— Indestructible ! 




Sold nearly one half 
cheaper than iron or steel 
fence posts. Great induce- 
ments to agents who can 
work territory. Agents 
may profitably engage in 
their manufacture. 

Counties for Sale. 

For terms and circulars 
address with stamp, 



5 ^^^^ HITCH 
FIELOLINE 4 POST 
POST FIELD ANCHOR 


W. A. 

Miami Co. 


DICKEY, 
Nead, Ind. 



ecial Notice 
Ladies... 



Oellig's Female Regulator and Womb Tablets have at- 
such a wide reputation and their success has been so 
iced, that we wish to establish a lady agent in every city, 
ind village, who shall make known to her friends 
tiderful cures which have been wrought by these prep- 
re are to-day thousands of women secretly suffering from 
Weakness who would gladly welcome these remedies, and 
ring them to their attention you are doing a kindness to 
iends and at the same time liberally increasing your 

te us for full particulars of our Special Offer to lady 
Nice, clean, profitable work, and a splendid income 

Oellig's Famous Female Remedies are standard prepara- 
ind hundreds of our lady representatives are now making 
me salaries. 



Iress all letters to 



ord Co. 



H. W. OELLIG, 

Woodbury, Pa. 



, Oellig's German Vegetable Tonic and Blood 
3r, by mail, 75 cents. 



AT ABOUT VIRGINIA? 



There is a great quantity of land in Virginia 
for sale at $5.00 to $20.00 per acre. This land 
in the main will produce very good crops 
when properly farmed. 

The climate, water and markets are good. 
If you want full information, with a view of 
securing a home in Virginia, address: 

;. MILLER, Roanoke, Va. 



Sonietliing of Great Importance to You I 



Beautiful Homes for the 
Thousands. 



All who are seeking a locality in which to acquire desirable 
homes in the most healthful and productive valleys and State in 
our Union, where YOU can raise and enjoy the luxuries of life, in 
the way of the best of fruits, vegetables, cereals, meats and beau- 
tiful flowers, in fact all that goes to make life enjoyable, can 
obtain truthful and reliable information of a section where these 
advantages all are combined, by calling on, or writing the Pay- 
ette Valley Real Estate Agency: 

A. E. WOOD, Manager. 

Payette, Idaho. 

Or^RI^C Brethren send us your cattle and horse hides and 
■VVf L>I-*4J ^e will tan and convert them into beautiful car- 
riage robes at small expense. They are moth-proof, equal in 
warmth and wear to the once famous buffalo robe. We tan all 
kinds of hides and skins for the fur and manufacture Robes, 
Coats, Rugs and Mits. Samples of fur and all particulars free. 
Address: 

MiLFORD Robe and Tanning Co., 

Milford, Ind. 
Reference: Miles & Higbee, Bankers, Milford, Ind. 



Three Big Leaders in Watches. 

Out of nearly a thousand watches which I have sold to 
Brethren in all parts of the United States, actual count 
shows that the following three grades compose nearly 50 
per cent of the total sales. In other words, these three 
watches have stood in greatest demand and have given 
greatest satisfaction. Tne Brethren have been quick to 
learn that it pays to buy good Watches and my sales for 
the coming year promise to be larger than ever before. 

GENTLEMEN'S WATCHES. 

No. 85. The famous Elein Watch. 

Finest 7-jewel genuine Elgin move- 
ment in beautiful 3-ounce silverine 
open-face, dust proof case, stem 
wind and stem set, warranted one 
year, and only $5.75 postpaid. 

No. 101. Extra Fine. High grade 
17-jeweled genuine Hampden or Seth 
Thomas works (your choice), in 3- 
ounce silverine open-face, dust-proof 
case, stem wind and stem set, for on- 
ly $10.00 postpaid. These watches 
are warranted one year each and 
have 17 bright ruby jewels with five 
pairs in settings, patent Brequet hair- 
spring, micrometer regulator, safety 
center pinion and deep sunk second 
dials. They are exceedingly accurate 
time keepers and I recommend them 
to all who desire a strictly high-grade 
watch at only a moderate price. 
" Lady Elgin No. 77." 
An exceptionally JiJte watch for Ladies^ 
Wear. 
Beautiful solid silver hunting case 
W^atch. One of the prettiest silver watch- 
es you ever saw. Assorted patterns, rich 
hand engraved. 7-jeweled nickel Elgin 
works, stem-wind and stem-set, warrant- 
ed one year and only $9.55 postpaid. 

I Sell all Kinds of Watches. 

Write for my new price-list. Watches from $1.00 to 
$35.00 each. You'll find my Qold Watches astonishingly 
low. Price list free. Address: tl. E. Newcomer, 

Lock Box 325. Mt. Morris, III. 





46 Brethren's Family Almanac. 

FARMING AND FRUIT QROWIN 
BY IRRIGATION! 



Cattle, Sheep, and Hog Raising and Feeding! \ 

Fine Weather, Sure Crops, Good Home Markei 



L 






A HINT j Many of Our Brethren desire to make a change of loca 

TO THE WISE I They want to go somewhere to better themselves. 

IS \ Where to Go — That is the question. 

I SUFFICIENT i The Nampa and Boise Valley in Idaho is a region of so ir 
^******^"" .•...•.......,...••.; advantages that it well deserves investigation. 

Healthfulness. — This is an important item to the prospective settler. An elevatio: 
2,000 feet, insures immunity from the many diseases so common in low 
swampy regions. Not the least important feature are the mild, short winters 
fording opportunity for out-of-door labor nearly the entire year. During the 
ceptionally cold winter of 1898-1899 elsewhere, the thermometer only fell to 
degrees below zero in the Nampa and Boise Valley. Owing to the very salubr 
climate the death rate in Idaho is lower than in any other State in the Union. 

No Cyclones, Storms, or Blizzards. — The very mention of this one fact will be appreci. 
by the many thousands who have been frightened by the terrible and destruc 
cyclones, so common in the Eastern States. 

Pure Water. — An unfailing supply of this very necessary factor is always available 1 
for irrigation and household purposes. This practically insures good crops, 
cause no drouth need be feared. 

Investigation Solicited. — Sometimes advertisements are misleading and promise too m 
This country asks for nothing but investigation to prove its merits. Write to s 
who are there now: Eld. Caleb J. Fogle, J. H. Graybill, George D. Pike, minis 
of the Brethren church at Nampa, Idaho, and they will give you an opinion b; 
on practical experience. A church of the Brethren will be organized soon. L 
ly it will be in full running order by the time this Almanac reaches most 
readers. 

The Oregon Short Line R. R. is the line by which to reach these very desirable lands, 
road offers special advantages to the prospective settler by its 

REDUCED RATES TO HOMESEEKERS. 

Write us at once for descriptive literature and ask any question you wish. We 

pleasure in giving you full information. 

D. E. BURLEY, 
Or S. BOCK, Brethren's Agent. General Passenger and Ticket Agent, Oregon Short U 

Dayton, Ohio. Salt Lake City, Utah 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 47 



An Interesting Bit of History. 



/ 

Deep in the woods of Maryland, in the valley of the Antietam, surrounded by its ma- 
: hills, there lived in the last century a man who, by the results of persevering study 
scientific investigation, secured for himself the lasting gratitude of his own and follow- 
yenerations. While others were bent on measures of war during those revolutionary 
s, he was quietly following out a mission of ''peace and good-will to men" by minis- 
g to the wants of the sick and afflicted. Means of transportation in those early days 
^, of course, very meager, being limited, in the main, to travel on horseback — but even 

form of transportation was denied to him of whom these few lines are written, for, 
1 a boy, he had met with an accident which had caused a curvature of the spine, giving 

the appearance of a "hunch-back," hence he always traveled afoot. The distance 
I farm to farm and valley to valley was oftentimes very great, but distance had no hor- 

for him if he thought his help and skill were needed, hence it was that he became 
vn, not only in the section of Maryland, where he lived at that time, but in parts of 
isylvania and Virginia as well. The man of whom we write was old Dr. Peter Fahrney, 
grandfather of the present doctor, who bears the same name. His life was not only 
•ted to scientific research, but he was also an active leader and a pillar in the church to 
h he belonged. It was these combined qualities of heart and mind which endeared 
to the people and which have actuated the descendants of those among whom he la- 
d to now honor his memory as a man and citizen. With that end in view, the Fahrney 
lorial Association was recently organized at San Mar, Md. It has secured control of 
"old medical shop" which was used by him as office, laboratory, etc. It is yet in a 
y good state of preservation. This "shop" (as it was then called) is now to be en- 
id by an iron fence and covered by a copper roof, so as to hereafter protect it from the 
ges of the weather. Near the "shop" is the same water spring, bubbling up between 
*ocks as it did over lOO years ago, and which, even in those days, afforded weary trav- 
; many a refreshing drink. This spring is now to be turned into a free, public fountain 
he benefit of travelers along that highway — indeed, a most fitting commemoration of 
ife and services of one who so untiringly ministered to both the physical and spiritual 
are of the people. It does not often happen that the memory of a man who lived such 
iet and unassuming existence, occupied as he was, solely in the field of medical re- 
:h, hoping thereby to benefit his fellow men, is so highly revered by a fourth and fifth 
:ration. One thing is certain, when, in this cold and prosaic age, a community makes 

public recognition of a man's services and is willing to place itself to such expense in 
)ring his memory so that future generations may also know about him, that man must 
: been above the ordinary and his life and activity not in vain. So much in honor of 
discoyerer of Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer. 



48 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 




AND Correspondence School. 

A TREE is known by its FRUIT; ^ 

A SCHOOL by the work of its STUDENTS. 

Mt. Morris College f^i^Tl. The Old Reliable! 



DO YOU KNOW that you can take a Bible Course by 
and so have the advantage of a competent teacher's experie 
in your home three months for $2.50^ 

DO YOU KNOW that you can take instruction from pre 
sional teachers in all kinds of artistic Penmanship and C 
mercial Law without leaving home? 

DO YOU KNOW that scores of public school children as 
as teachers, clerks and ministers from all parts of the Un 
States and Canada have helped themselves by taking our inst 
tion by mail? 

DO YOU KNOW that by dropping us a postal, you will 
ceive full particulars concerning our correspondence work? 

NOW YOU KNOW I Will you let us have the posta 



once? Address: 



MOUNT MORRIS COLLEGE, 
Mount Morris, lllim 



.Jr. WRIGHTSMAN'S... 

Sovereip Balm of Life 

IS STILL PREPARED FOR 

Expectant Mothers. 



To the thousands who have used it in past years it has proven 
itself to be a preparation of genuine merit. It has been prepared 
especially to give relief to the expectant mother of all her distress 
so common in the period of gestation, and to so assist nature 
that parturition is short and easy. It is purely vegetable and no 
one need fear any ill effects from its use. It is also an excellent 
uterine tonic, correcting all irregularities and relieving woman of 
the troubles peculiar to her sex. From the young girl just bloom- 
ing into womanhood to the woman passing through the "change 
of life" it has proven itself to be an invaluable remedy. 

It is prepared in liquid and dry form. The liquid form is sold 
by druggists and the dry form is sent direct by mail. The price 
is $1.00 per bottle or package. 

Write for sample of dry form and our 48 page booklet giving 
full particulars. Address all letters to 

D. B. Sengrer & Co., 

Box 4CX). Franklin Grove, III, 



Cap* Goods 1^ 



Sent by mail to all parts of the 
United States. 



Largest Assortment! 

Lowest Prices! 

Best Values 



R. 



E. Arnold & Co., 

Mount JVIorriSy III. 



Send for SampL 
FREE! 



1 

1 



Sisters' Caps and Bonnets 

MADE TO ORDER. 

Members of the Brethren church will be interested t 
know that I have secured the services of one of the bes 
bonnet makers in our city, a sister in the church, who wil 
make to order, caps and bonnets for Sisters' wear, mal 
ing them on short notice, using honest material and charg 
ing very reasonable prices. 

I have prepared a handsome illustrated price-list, de 
scribing and pricing many different kinds of caps and boi 
nets and will be pleased to mail you a copy free upon ap 
plication. Address: 

H. E. NEWCOMER. 
Lock Box 325. Mt. Morris, Iu 



...WILD ROSE SHEEP FARM... 



240 Acres employed in rearing 
CHEVIOT SHEEP 

The Best Sheep for WOOIi and MUTTON. 

Shorthorn Cattle 

BE£F and MILK. 

Poland China Pigs 
HOWARD H. KEIM, 




Barred Plynnouth Roc^ 

Light Brahmas, 
8. C. Brown... 

Leghorn Chicke 



If you want anything: in our line, w: 
us. We always have barg^ains for sale, i 
isfaction guaranteed. 

Ladoga, Montgomery Co., In< 



MANCHESTER COLLEGE LIBRARY 



3 9315 01027609 2 



m 



' '^' »^ *^ *^ '^^ M5if» "^t- 

^ Manchester College ^. 




^ Brethren Historical 
Pa Library 

>», NORTH MANCHESTER, IND. 

•*^ *^*» '^ '^ '^ "^ 'iSf* ^^ic 
.cX? . cJ^ .C-Aj .cX:> .cA3 .qXj . tX^.t/A